Adonis Diaries

 

Ten reasons why the British parliament should vote no to bombing Iraq

Is this an excuse to test more upgraded Tornadoes jet planes on Iraqi people?

Chris Nineham 24 September 2014. Posted in News

On Friday 26 September, David Cameron will ask MPs to vote in favour of joining the US bombing campaign in Iraq and take the UK into yet another Middle East war.

Not in my name

1) The West’s last operation in Iraq ended just three years ago. For those with a short memory it didn’t go well. More than half a million people died, millions fled the country and Iraq’s infrastructure was devastated. The operation generated deep resentment against the West.

2) The current chaos in Iraq – including the rise of the reactionary Isis – is largely the result of the 8 years of that occupation. On top of the trauma of the assault, sectarian division was built into the operation.

Elections were organised along communal lines and the authorities used sectarianism to undermine resistance.

By 2006, Baghdad had been turned from an integrated, modern city into a patchwork of ruined communal ghettoes.

The open discrimination of the Western-backed Maliki government detonated a Sunni insurgency last year that helped fuel the rise of Isis in Iraq.

3) Bombing always kills and terrorises civilians. Recent coalition bombing raids on Raqqa in Syria have brought death and panic to its residents. One civilian there told western reporters ‘I would not wish them on my worst enemy’.

4) All three of Britain’s major military interventions in the last thirteen years have been disasters. In 2001 we were told an invasion of Afghanistan would rout the Taliban.

Thirteen years and tens of thousands of deaths later the Taliban have grown in strength and the country is broken.

The bombing of Libya in 2011 was justified as essential to stop a massacre by Gaddafi. After it began an estimated 30,000 were killed in a terrifying cycle of violence. The country is now a failed state with no real government.

5)  The coalition that has been put together for the bombing of Syria – apparently in an effort to give the attacks legitimacy – comprises some of the most ruthless and benighted  regimes in the region.

Human Rights Watch reports that nineteen people were beheaded in Saudi Aarbia in August.

Qatar and UAE have notorious human rights’ records that include the use of forced labour. All three have funded violent Jihadi groups in the region.

6) Bombing raids will increase hatred of the west. One of the wider results of the ‘War on Terror’ has been to spread Al- Quaida and other terrorist groups across whole regions of the world. In 2001 there were relatively small numbers of such militants, centred mainly on Pakistan. Now there are groups across the middle east, central Asia and Africa.

7) The timing is cynical. David Cameron has recalled parliament to debate an attack on Iraq just two days before the start of the last Tory Conference before the general election. This at a time when he is engaged in pushing a right wing, nationalist agenda for party political purposes.

8) Mission creep is almost inevitable. There are already more than a thousand US military active in Iraq and senior US military figures are arguing they should now be openly involved in fighting. In Britain a growing number of voices from Tony Blair to Lieutenant General Sir Graeme Lamb are recommending British boots on the ground.

9) The attack will cost money much needed for other things. One Tomahawk cruise missile costs £850,000, enough to pay the annual salary of 28 NHS nurses.

The US has already fired about 50 of these missiles at Isis targets in Syria. It is estimated Britain spent between £500 million and one billion pounds bombing Libya in 2011. This was roughly the same as the savings made by ending the education maintenance allowance (EMA); or three times the amount saved by scrapping the disability living allowance.

10) The vote will have a global impact. On Friday, MPs have a chance to make a real difference on matters of peace and war. The US wants Britain on board to prove it is not isolated.

When MPs blocked Cameron’s last push for airstrikes, on Syria a year ago, they stopped Obama launching attacks too. A no vote could help reverse the drift towards another full scale western war in the middle east.

Note: The US led “coalition” on terrorism is giving legitimacy to ISIS on the ground that the US is perceived in the Islamic countries as the nemesis, particularly its consistent and blattant support of apartheid and racist Zionist State of Israel.

And why the US wants to bomb? Just to please the absolute obscurantist monarchy in Saudi Arabia that is paying the tab.

 

“If you have nothing to say. Say nothing.”

That’s what Mark Twain wrote.

So what is this Twaddle tendency many of us exhibit?

Ambiguous ideas transform into vacant ramblings.  It is hard to speak when your ideas are confused and confusing.

The best speakers are those who harshly critiqued their copies and spend plenty of efforts and time to clarify their ideas and subject matter.

If you are afraid to be viewed as a simpleton, refrain from saying your clear and simple statements.

Otherwise, clear and simple statements are the domain of the courageous people who have a purpose and passion.

The worse off a company is the greater the talk of the CEO

The fewer results in a scientific field the more babble is necessary in the published works

The more voluminous the book the more irrelevant chapters and paragraphs are inserted.

The more eloquent the haze of words, the more easily we fall for them.

Useless chatter is what characterize the volumes of philosophers.

 

No full sovereignty darling Abbass, and you knew it, and Obama also told you to bug off…

Israel’s insistence on ongoing security precautions in the West Bank does not constitute an insurmountable obstacle to Palestinian statehood and sovereignty, Justice Minister Tzipi Livni told The Times of Israel.

But it was always clear, from the start of negotiations, she added, that due to Israel’s security needs a Palestinian state would not enjoy “full and complete sovereignty.”

In an interview ahead of Rosh Hashanah, Livni, who led Israel’s negotiating team in this year’s failed negotiations with the Palestinian Authority, said the collapse of the peace process was deeply disappointing, but that it was “not too late” to restart talks. (The full interview appears here.)

“Always, from the first day of the negotiations, it was clear that any agreement (on Palestinian statehood) would not include full and complete sovereignty,” the Hatnua party leader said.

“We are speaking in terms of a sovereign Palestinian state, but it’s clear that the sovereign Palestinian state must accept limitations. Certainly demilitarization. By the way, that’s also what we’re demanding now for Gaza. Limitations and arrangements that will ensure, in the long term, that no threat is created of the kind we have been witnessing.”

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, she went on, had accepted the need for a demilitarized Palestinian state, “though there’s an argument about what demilitarization entails… That’s why you negotiate. This all has operational expression on the ground: How is it overseen? Who’s at the border crossings? Who deploys along the border?”

Then-foreign minister Tzipi Livni with Mahmoud Abbas, president of the Palestinian Authority, at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, September, 2008 (photo credit: AP Photo /Keystone/Alessandro della Valle)

Then-foreign minister Tzipi Livni with Mahmoud Abbas, president of the Palestinian Authority, at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, September, 2008 (photo credit: AP Photo /Keystone/Alessandro della Valle)

Livni was clarifying Israel’s position in the wake of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s declarations this summer about the imperative to maintain Israeli security oversight in the West Bank under any agreement with the PA.

“Germany also took upon itself military restrictions after World War II. To this day, there’s a British military base in Cyprus. Sinai is demilitarized in accordance with the Israel-Egypt peace agreement,” Livni said. “Therefore the idea that there is a necessary contradiction between Israel’s security and Palestinian sovereignty is incorrect. They get the state and, by virtue of their independence, they take upon themselves certain limitations. One goes with the other.”

The justice minister also revealed details of what she said was an initiative agreed upon with the Palestinians to foster a “culture of peace” on both sides — a bid to change the tone and content of media, religious leaders’ statements, education, and more — in order to create a climate that would encourage compromise. “We had an agreed text,” she said. “Had we extended the talks (last spring), I think we were going to implement (the initiative) during the extended negotiations.”

Speaking days before Abbas was set to address the UN General Assembly, with an anticipated demand that Israel be required to set a timetable for withdrawing from the West Bank, Livni criticized the PA leader for turning to the UN rather than continuing peace negotiations with Israel.

Abbas had taken the easier route of going to the UN and forgoing negotiations, she charged, “because in negotiations you have to pay a price and concede things, whereas when you go to the UN, you can get everything you want.” (Apparently, Israel feels no obligations to concede anything)

“But it won’t give you a state,” she warned. “There’s no state via the UN.” (Why? Because of the US perpetual veto?)

She also said she was sorry the US had chosen not make public the framework document it drew up “which provided answers on all the core issues” of dispute between Israel and the Palestinians.

“It was very fair. It gave expression to both sides… We wanted to advance the negotiations on that basis. Israel essentially accepted this framework,” she said, while Abbas did not. “I have grievances with him — over how the negotiations ended, over his turning to the UN, his joining up with Hamas, in the Palestinian unity government.” (All along, Israel claimed that Abbas cannot deliver because the Palestinians had no unified government. Now, it is not possible simply because they united)

Livni expressed profound concern that the anti-Israel public opinion in the Arab world was also spreading to Europe, and partially blamed the settlement enterprise.

“The problem is that what we’ve seen in the Arab world — where public opinion is anti-Israel and it is very hard for the leaderships to deal with — is also happening now in Europe,” she said. “I have discussions with world leaders. It’s very hard for them. They say, ‘We understand why you have to hit Hamas. We’re with you. But the issue of the settlements renders Israel incomprehensible and shorn of credibility when it says it wants peace.’”

“In the eyes of Europe, the European street,” she went on, “the settlement enterprise is a kind of old-style colonialism. Not self-defense, which would be acceptable.

“That mix is not good for Israel,” she stressed. “I seek to ensure that we retain the legitimacy to defend ourselves against those extremist terrorist forces. And Israel’s policy as regards what it wants in these areas (of peacemaking and settlements) is not clear. And ultimately that harms Israel’s security.”

She said that she does not share the ideology “that believes we need to stay in all of the Land of Israel.” And “to the best of my knowledge,” she added, “the prime minister does not share that ideology.”

Regarding international attitudes to Israel over this summer’s conflict with Hamas, the justice minister said, “I don’t expect the world not to judge us. It should judge us — but on the same basis as it judges itself or any democracy. Fatalities on the Palestinian side are accidental, after we have made every effort to prevent them. By contrast, the terrorists are deliberately aiming at civilians. And I expect the world to make that distinction.” (How in denial!)

Unfortunately, she went on, “as time passes since the establishment of Israel, what was taken for granted in 1948 is no longer taken for granted. We see ourselves, satellite view, as a tiny state surrounded by enemies. The world looks from the Google Earth perspective, and sees a soldier with his weapon and a Palestinian boy or girl. And that viewpoint is deepening. It is a skewed picture of the conflict. The sorrow over seeing civilians killed, a sorrow that I share, skews the judicial perspective of the reality.”

Note: Abbass did visit Obama and he turned his suggestion down for a Palestinian State. Abbass addressed the UN and demanded a timetable for a Palestinian State. It is not in Israel ideology to give Palestinians any kinds of recognition: They still insist on calling them “Arabs“.

House-Money effect: Money is not neutral, it is not naked and it is colorful

Do you think money is money?

Are cash money, checks, traveler checks, stocks, bonds… equivalent?

Is the money you saved from hard work equivalent in value from what you find in the street?

Is money inherited similar in value from hard work?

Which kind of money you tend to spend quickly, swiftly and on unnecessary items?

Does the emotional shroud adds value to money?

Does money earned in a lottery ticket change your decisions when compared to hard earned money?

Which kinds of money gives you this urge to take a postponed long vacation? Or to improve your property?

Suppose you won $1,000 on a roulette game and then lost it. How great is your regret and suffering? I guess it won’t last long compared to hard earned saving.

Here is an experiment:

Two groups are randomly selected. Group A is given $30 in cash and then asked to bet: You win $9 if head or lose $9 if tail in a coin toss.

Group B is not offered any money. The subjects are told that they will receive $30 or take part in a coin tossing. The subject win $39 if head or $21 if tail.

Which group felt incited to gamble? 70% of Group A gambled compare to 43% in group B. Why?

The expected value is the same, but group A got readily in hand $30?

Marketing strategists expect to benefit from your sheer exuberance by rewarding you with upfront cash money if you apply to their programs (credit cards, airlines, phone companies…).

Eventually, you’ll quickly spend the money and accrue exorbitant interest rates on your credit card.

For the same expected value, which money you prefer: cash money, checks, traveler checks, stocks, bonds, inheritance, lottery…?

Does the term “added value” is of purely a monetary connotation?

 

 

A few dictators’ bed games

The Arab world has long been plagued with less than perfect representation and ruling.

Many of the kings and presidents of the region end up being the oppressive dictator types.

However, with rumors of their extremely romantic sides surfacing, there seems to be more than the eye can see regarding these rulers, Wives and mistresses of these infamous dictators weigh in to reveal the true nature of these powerful men.

Muammar Qaddafi

(Image via The Guardian)

Known for his strength on the streets of Tripoli, President Qaddafi is also gaining a reputation as the world’s biggest Casanova.

An oppressor on the streets, but a devil in the sheets, his Excellency always manages to put his girls’ needs first.

“I feel like his very open-minded approach on unreciprocated oral is good enough to cancel out his war-crimes, something for the International Criminal Court to consider,” shares his live-in girlfriend, anonymous.

Omar al-Bashir

(Image via Star FM)

This Sudanese president took a page from Qaddafi when it comes to fashion, but the charm is all his.

“He enjoys cuddling, like, a lot,” says his girlfriend – who also chose to stay anonymous. “I call him my big teddy bear,” she says, chuckling, “he also loves role-playing in the bedroom, we don’t shy away from playing South-North Sudan, political incorrectness kind of gets him off.”

Husni Mubarak

(Image via Telegraph)

Sure he may have caused the unraveling of an entire country, but according to his wife, Egyptian President Mubarak is actually a dreamboat.

“I think he’s just really misunderstood, would such a horrible man have bought me roses at least three times in the past year? I think not.”

Mrs. Mubarak goes on to detail how on several occasions, her husband postponed important national security meetings just to be with her, citing that he was an incurable romantic. “He can’t get enough of me, he says that the genocide rumors can wait,” she says with a dreamy smile, adding, “I feel like the luckiest girl in the world.”

Jamal Basha

(Image via Wikipedia)

Personally responsible for the demise of the region during World War I, Jamal Basha has a fairly lousy reputation.

However, newly uncovered letters from him to his young mistress at the time reveal his boyish charm and seductive ways.

Below is an excerpt of one of the tamer letters: “Yellow diamonds in the sky, and we’re standing side by side, as your shadow crosses mine…we found love in a hopeless place.” Pure poetry.

A few catchy statements

1. For every “remote miss” that renders a person stronger, there are countless near-misses that crush people and render them disabled to function properly in society.

2. Every success disguises an abdication (Simone de Beauvoir)

3. Success flees between my fingers… and it is my own life that counts the most. (Marguerite Yourcenar)

4. Love is what people torture you in order to force you to say “I love you”. All people lie. (Orhan Pamuk)

5. My leg is sufficiently cured to know that it will never be all right

6. No act is too superficial until we covers it with a decent word.

7. There are always music during an execution

8. Fear preserves you by your dread of punishment, which never fails.(Niccolo Machiavelli)

9. Love is preserved by the links of obligation, which is broken at most opportunity for its advantage. Lay it on the baseness of mankind.

10. Do you know of an unhappy person writing a “self help” book? About their failures and unhappiness?

11. Should mankind stick to ancestral traditions that no longer work or are valid?

12. Nothing can ever be as shocking as life. Except writing. (Ibn Zerhani)

13. Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think feeling a little different… And must a name mean something? (Lewis Carroll)

14. Never use epigraphs: They kill the mystery in the work (Adli)

15. If that’s how it has to die, go ahead and kill it. Then kill the false prophets who sold you on the mystery in the first place (Balti)

(I couldn’t help but think that all these extremists should eventually kill their caliph or cult leaders)

16. It is perfectly childish. People separate for a reason. They do not run away without telling you their reason. They even give you a chance to reply. (Marcel Proust)

17. If you wanted to be cheerful, melancholic, wistful, thoughtful or courteous… you simply had to act those behaviors with every gesture (Patricia Highsmith)

18. Idle men, chasing after fairy tales (Rumi)

Looks bad and genetically modified virus? This Ebola plaguing western Africa

And manufactured by Western Pharmaceuticals, and US DoD?

Ebola virus destroys peoples’ internal organs and the body deteriorates rapidly after death.
The organ softens and the tissues turn into jelly, even if it is refrigerated to keep it cold. Spontaneous liquefaction is what happens to the body of people killed by the Ebola virus!
I have read a number of articles from your Internet outreach as well as articles from other sources about the casualties in Liberia and other West African countries about the human devastation caused by the Ebola virus.
About a week ago, I read an article published in the Internet news summary publication of the Friends of Liberia that said that there was an agreement that the initiation of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa was due to the contact of a two-year old child with bats that had flown in from the Congo.
That report made me disconcerted with the reporting about Ebola, and it stimulated a response to the “Friends of Liberia,” saying that African people are not ignorant and gullible, as is being implicated.
A response from Dr. Verlon Stone said that the article was not theirs, and that “Friends of Liberia” was simply providing a service.
He then asked if he could publish my letter in their Internet forum. I gave my permission, but I have not seen it published.
Because of the widespread loss of life, fear, physiological trauma, and despair among Liberians and other West African citizens, it is incumbent that I make a contribution to the resolution of this devastating situation, which may continue to recur, if it is not properly and adequately confronted. I will address the situation in five (5) points:
Dr. Cyril Broderick, Professor of Plant Pathology published this 09/09/2014 -

Scientists allege deadly diseases such as Ebola and AIDS are bio weapons being tested on Africans.
Other reports have linked the Ebola virus outbreak to an attempt to reduce Africa’s population. Liberia happens to be the continent’s fastest growing population.
1.    EBOLA IS A GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM (GMO)
Horowitz (1998) was deliberate and unambiguous when he explained the threat of new diseases in his text, Emerging Viruses: AIDS and Ebola – Nature, Accident or Intentional.
In his interview with Dr. Robert Strecker in Chapter 7, the discussion, in the early 1970s, made it obvious that the war was between countries that hosted the KGB and the CIA, and the ‘manufacture’ of ‘AIDS-Like Viruses’ was clearly directed at the other.
In passing during the Interview, mention was made of Fort Detrick, “the Ebola Building,” and ‘a lot of problems with strange illnesses’ in “Frederick [Maryland].
By Chapter 12 in his text, he had confirmed the existence of an American Military-Medical-Industry that conducts biological weapons tests under the guise of administering vaccinations to control diseases and improve the health of “black Africans overseas.”
The book is an excellent text, and all leaders plus anyone who has interest in science, health, people, and intrigue should study it.
I am amazed that African leaders are making no acknowledgements or reference to these documents.
2.  EBOLA HAS A TERRIBLE HISTORY, AND TESTING HAS BEEN SECRETLY TAKING PLACE IN AFRICA
I am now reading The Hot Zone, a novel, by Richard Preston (copyrighted 1989 and 1994); it is heart-rending.
The prolific and prominent writer, Steven King, is quoted as saying that the book is “One of the most horrifying things I have ever read. What a remarkable piece of work.
As a New York Times bestseller, The Hot Zone is presented as “A terrifying true story.” Terrifying, yes, because the pathological description of what was found in animals killed by the Ebola virus is what the virus has been doing to citizens of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia in its most recent outbreak: Ebola virus destroys peoples’ internal organs and the body deteriorates rapidly after death.
The organ softens and the tissues turn into jelly, even if it is refrigerated to keep it cold. Spontaneous liquefaction is what happens to the body of people killed by the Ebola virus!
The author noted in Point 1, Dr. Horowitz, chides The Hot Zone for writing to be politically correct; I understand because his book makes every effort to be very factual.
The 1976 Ebola incident in Zaire, during President Mobutu Sese Seko, was the introduction of the GMO Ebola to Africa.
3.    SITES AROUND AFRICA, AND IN WEST AFRICA, HAVE OVER THE YEARS BEEN SET UP FOR TESTING EMERGING DISEASES, ESPECIALLY EBOLA
The World Health Organization (WHO) and several other UN Agencies have been implicated in selecting and enticing African countries to participate in the testing events, promoting vaccinations, but pursuing various testing regiments. The August 2, 2014 article, West Africa: What are US Biological Warfare Researchers Doing in the Ebola Zone? by Jon Rappoport of Global Research pinpoints the problem that is facing African governments.
Obvious in this and other reports are, among others:
(a) The US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), a well-known centre for bio-war research, located at Fort Detrick, Maryland;
(b) Tulane University, in New Orleans, USA, winner of research grants, including a grant of more than $7 million the National Institute of Health (NIH) to fund research with the Lassa viral hemorrhagic fever;
(c) the US Center for Disease Control (CDC);
(d) Doctors Without Borders (also known by its French name, Medicins Sans Frontiers);
(e) Tekmira, a Canadian pharmaceutical company;
(f) The UK’s GlaxoSmithKline; and
(g) the Kenema Government Hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone.
Reports narrate stories of the US Department of Defense (DoD) funding Ebola trials on humans, trials which started just weeks before the Ebola outbreak in Guinea and Sierra Leone.
The reports continue and state that the DoD gave a contract worth $140 million dollars to Tekmira, a Canadian pharmaceutical company, to conduct Ebola research. This research work involved injecting and infusing healthy humans with the deadly Ebola virus.
Hence, the DoD is listed as a collaborator in a “First in Human” Ebola clinical trial (NCT02041715, which started in January 2014 shortly before an Ebola epidemic was declared in West Africa in March. Disturbingly, many reports also conclude that the US government has a viral fever bioterrorism research laboratory in Kenema, a town at the epicentre of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
The only relevant positive and ethical olive-branch seen in all of my reading is that Theguardian.com reported, “The US government funding of Ebola trials on healthy humans comes amid warnings by top scientists in Harvard and Yale that such virus experiments risk triggering a worldwide pandemic.” That threat still persists.
4.    THE NEED FOR LEGAL ACTION TO OBTAIN REDRESS FOR DAMAGES INCURRED DUE TO THE PERPETUATION OF INJUSTICE IN THE DEATH, INJURY AND TRAUMA IMPOSED ON LIBERIANS AND OTHER AFRICANS BY THE EBOLA AND OTHER DISEASE AGENTS. 
The U. S., Canada, France, and the U. K. are all implicated in the detestable and devilish deeds that these Ebola tests are. There is the need to pursue criminal and civil redress for damages, and African countries and people should secure legal representation to seek damages from these countries, some corporations, and the United Nations. Evidence seems abundant against Tulane University, and suits should start there. Yoichi Shimatsu’s article, The Ebola Breakout Coincided with UN Vaccine Campaigns, as published on August 18, 2014, in the Liberty Beacon.
5.   AFRICAN LEADERS AND AFRICAN COUNTRIES NEED TO TAKE THE LEAD IN DEFENDING BABIES, CHILDREN, AFRICAN WOMEN, AFRICAN MEN, AND THE ELDERLY. THESE CITIZENS DO NOT DESERVE TO BE USED AS GUINEA PIGS! 
Africa must not relegate the Continent to become the locality for disposal and the deposition of hazardous chemicals, dangerous drugs, and chemical or biological agents of emerging diseases.
There is urgent need for affirmative action in protecting the less affluent of poorer countries, especially African citizens, whose countries are not as scientifically and industrially endowed as the United States and most Western countries, sources of most viral or bacterial GMOs that are strategically designed as biological weapons. It is most disturbing that the U. S. Government has been operating a viral hemorrhagic fever bioterrorism research laboratory in Sierra Leone. Are there others?
Wherever they exist, it is time to terminate them. If any other sites exist, it is advisable to follow the delayed but essential step: Sierra Leone closed the US bioweapons lab and stopped Tulane University for further testing.
The world must be alarmed. All Africans, Americans, Europeans, Middle Easterners, Asians, and people from every conclave on Earth should be astonished. African people, notably citizens more particularly of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone are victimized and are dying every day.
Listen to the people who distrust the hospitals, who cannot shake hands, hug their relatives and friends. Innocent people are dying, and they need our help.
The countries are poor and cannot afford the whole lot of personal protection equipment (PPE) that the situation requires.
The threat is real, and it is larger than a few African countries. The challenge is global, and we request assistance from everywhere, including China, Japan, Australia, India, Germany, Italy, and even kind-hearted people in the U.S., France, the U.K., Russia, Korea, Saudi Arabia, and anywhere else whose desire is to help. The situation is bleaker than we on the outside can imagine, and we must provide assistance however we can.
To ensure a future that has less of this kind of drama, it is important that we now demand that our leaders and governments be honest, transparent, fair, and productively engaged. They must answer to the people. Please stand up to stop Ebola testing and the spread of this dastardly disease.
About the Author:
Dr. Broderick is a former professor of Plant Pathology at the University of Liberia’s College of Agriculture and Forestry.  He is also the former Observer Farmer in the 1980s.
It was from this column in our newspaper, the Daily Observer, that Firestone spotted him and offered him the position of Director of Research in the late 1980s.
He is a scientist, who has taught for many years at the Agricultural College of the University of Delaware.
Note: Why Obama is sending 3,000 US troops to Liberia? To contain a civil unrest and protect the US bioterrorism research centers?

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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