Adonis Diaries

Archive for July 2nd, 2010

This exciting long life

I had a tortuous dream, but I managed an association between Einstein’s equation for defining energy and my definition for life. The details and clarifications of my equation were the products of my conscious state, but the concept came in a dream.

Einstein defined the energy of an object as the product of the “mass” of the object by the square of the speed of light C.

My definition of life is the sum of the products of elementary tasks by the speed of executing the task.  Obviously, this equation needs plenty of clarifications before other relevant functions may substitute this to a lousy summation method.

Let us consider that any simple activity is constituted of hundreds of infinitesimal tasks, carried successively or in parallel, in order for an activity to be accomplished.  For example, in line production, every activity is subdivided into smaller tasks with computed standard time to finish an activity.  The idea was to train workers to be skilled withing the standard time for each task and even be paid accordingly to efficiency. (Quality control field falls within this notion)

Mind you, that acquiring skills and talents in any profession demands lots of repetition and investment of time and energy.  Well, every repetition of any task is counted in the equation.  You can imagine how much life has been wasted just to be accredited as a professional or a skilled worker!

If our brain and limbs could master a skill by simply “getting it” from the first trial or exposure, imagine how much life we would have saved for another interesting things.  We would feel that life is stretching so long that it seems ageless.

Repetition of a task include the thousands of times that we copy, paste, reclassify, review, re-dust off our productions and memories.  Can you imagine how much life has been wasted by going back to long past activities?

Dreaming is an activity with thousands of split-second takes to constitute a movie.  Even the recurring dreams, mostly the unwanted ones, are counted.  The second time we experience a “deja-vue” dream is not as bad as the first projection: we tend to sit and watch as one of the audience instead of being part of the movie; we just wait for this bad film to finish since we feel helpless to stop it or even press “Pause”.

Evidently, very few tasks go as fast as light C.  For example, the movements and reactions of limbs are pretty slow compared to light; brain reactions are at best as fast as electrons or 20 thousands km per second.  One of the rare tasks that is as fast as C can be the case when someone says: “I fell in love from the first sight.”  This performance has high value rating in life: It can be repeated a hundred times a day; not necessarily with one hundred different women.

For example, if you are endowed with a vivid imagination and can recapitulate “the moment” in your mind ad infinitum then, you can summarize the best that life can offer and very efficiently.

My position is that it is the first occurence that counts most, but recollecting this miraculous “moment” over and over again beats all other kinds of tasks in whatever criteria system you adopt.

Life equation clearly shows that there are many sorts of activities that ruin quality of life. What is your quality of life when you commute to work?  Repeating so-called automatic reactions in driving a car, a donkey, or a bike for hours a day is definitely cases of worsening the impact and mocking my formula.

For example, how often you regurgitate the left over worries from yesterday when you commute? How often you re-enact the clownish acting drama for the current day difficulties?  How often you ran a red light and ran over a lousy living person?  All these tasks count in the equation and should be eliminated the sooner the better.

Think of algebra and how to cancel out redundant factors so that your life equation looks much simpler and beautiful.  So, how did you decide to commute in order to “save time” in congested metropolis?

One small problem remains to be resolved before we set our mind to changing our life style to maximize life equation and its many constraint equations:  How many tasks and activities can fill a lifetime without being repeated again?  Are we indulging in repetitions simply because we lack the imagination to figure out plenty of activities?  Are traditions the main hurdle for our lack of imagination because it dangerously reduced licit or legitimate activities to be experienced?

How about getting on this wonderful job of revisiting taxonomies of tasks and activities that could excite you (or not) after retirement?  How about you fine tune the many tasks that constitute professional line fishing?

Note: I classified this article under “lucubrations” assuming that not many readers will select this category from among the other most interesting 45 categories in my blog.

Did Tamerlane (Timor Lank) Create Empires?

There is this army commander of the 14th century who kept his army on the march longer (for over 25 years) and crossed more lands than Alexander, Genghis Khan, or Attila and conquered more Empires and was never defeated and slept in his tent, outside city-limits, even in his Capital Samarkand (in current Uzbekistan).

The Persian gave him the nickname Lank because he was slightly lame in one leg.  This is Timor Lank who was not the son of any Monarch, prince, or even a tribal leader.

Timor Lank was from the Caucasus region (probably around the region of Azerbaijan and Chechnya (I get pretty upset when history authors fail to located current geographical areas and just paste the ancient names).

He was a Moslem and veneered Imams and clerics claimed to be descendants of the Prophet Muhammad’s family, and who wore the black turban.

Otherwise, he didn’t give a hoot about Moslems when conquering lands and people. He killed mostly Moslems since the vast area of his operations were mostly Islam Land.

For example, he built pyramids of skulls: 60,000 heads in Asfahan (Iran), 3,000 in Aleppo, and many other skull pyramids in India…

First, Timor Lank chased out the Tatar “Golden Hordes” (led by a descendant of Genghis Khan) along the Volga River (current Russia) and burned and sacked all their cities and villages.  He did not resume his operations, but by the end of his war, the Golden Hordes were weakened and displaced.  It was the fate of the Russian Tsar, Ivan the Terrible, to finish off the job against the Tatars in the 16th century and expand his Empire. You may claim that Tamerlane ultimately created current Russia.

Timor Lank captured Samarkand and made it its Capital.

He descended on Persia and conquered this Empire and beheaded over 60,000 of the population in Isfahan and piled up the head in shapes of pyramids.  This city surrendered peacefully and Timor Lank had no plans to occupy it; he was just crossing!

It happened that for a few cases of rape within the city by Timor Lank’s garrison of 500 soldiers, the inhabitants slaughtered the soldiers.  Timor Lank was camping outside city limit, always in his tent. And the reaction was a nightmare on the city inhabitants.

The commander moved on toward Turkey in 1400.  The Turkish Sultan army was completely demolished and the Sultan was put in a tiny cage so that Timor Lank could use it as a stool to mount his horse. This commander could have conquered all of Turkey, but instead he headed south to enter Aleppo and Damascus in Syria.

If Timor Lank had not vanquished the Turkish army then the Byzantium Capital of Constantinople would have fallen 50 years earlier along with most of Europe.

There would be no Western Europe or the Renaissance:  at that time, the enmities between Genoa and Venice was at its zenith, the Kingdom of Poland was weak, there was no Russian Empire, and the King Henry of Portugal had not begun challenging the high seas to discover new routes to India and the Far East.

And the King of France Charles 8 would not have entered and ruined Rome and displaced the skilled artisans and thinkers, located and concentrated in Papal Rome, to all over western Europe that started the Renaissance.

In the 13th century, the Mameluke Sultan of Egypt had moved out from Egypt with his army and defeated the Mogul army of Hulagu in Palestine around 1250.  This time around, the Mameluke Sultan did not venture to come out to rescue his vassals  in Syria.

Damascus put up a serious fight, but Timor Lank tactics were always to destabilize any city before setting siege.  The skilled people in Syria and Palestine were sent to build and develop Samarkand. (That is the story of the Levant since antiquity: armies conquer The Levant to capture its skilled workers.)

The Ottoman Sultan would later defeat the Mameluke Sultan in the 16th century and conquer Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and all North African countries.

Timor Lank conquered Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

One of Timor Lank offspring would establish the Mogul Empire in India (the Punjab) that lasted over 5 centuries.  The British Empire would finally take over all of India by the end of the 19th century, but failed to retain Afghanistan after two bloody massacres of its troops.

The British had drawn the current borders among Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and Kashmir.  As well as drawing many other borders in the Middle-East and Africa with colonial France

This ruthless commander Tamerlane was getting ready to march on China when he died at the age of 63.

Note:  My published novel on wordpress.com “Rainbow over the Levant” is set in that time period.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

July 2010
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