Adonis Diaries

Archive for August 21st, 2013

Activists In DC:  Identifying Long-Term Police Protest Infiltrator

Rumors have flown for many years that DC police routinely infiltrate and spy on the frequent protests in the nation’s Capitol.

Until now, activists have never been able to identify a specific undercover cop at a protest. After months of piecing together evidence, attorneys Jeffrey Light and Sean Canavan working with United Students Against Sweatshop (USAS) have confirmed that under an assumed name, Metro police officer Nicole Rizzi has participated in USAS protests against companies doing business in Bangladesh who refuse to sign the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh following the death of as many as 1,129 workers in the Rana Plaza factory collapse.

Mike Elk posted on Popular resistance www.inthesetimes.com this August 6th, 2013

Activists In DC Identify Long-Term Police Protest Infiltrator

 

USAS and its lawyers have numerous pieces of evidence placing Rizzi at protests under a pseudonym.

District of Columbia Public Employee Information List records obtained by In These Times confirm that Rizzi has been on the DC Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) force since December of 2003.

USAS filed suit on Monday against the District of Columbia seeking an injunction to stop police from spying on the group’s activities.

The story of how Rizzi was uncovered reads like a mix of “Gossip Girl” and “The Wire.”

Activists pieced her identity together from her obsessive posting to social media sites, including Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, FacebookWordPress and Yfrog.

Lacy MacAuley, an activist and media manager for the Institute for Policy Studies, has suspected for the past several years that a protester named “Missy” was an undercover cop. “Missy” seemed to be at every protest, but no one knew her. However, MacAuley had no way of proving her suspicions.

In November of 2012, MacAuley was at a bar on U Street when a friend recommended that she follow a Twitter account of a funny person with the handle @snufftastic. MacAuley immediately identified the user in the photographs as the person she knew as “Missy.” The user Tweeted frequently about the daily grind of being a police officer in DC.

MacAuley says she then spotted Rizzi as “Missy” at an anti-Keystone pipeline protest at the Canadian Embassy on March 21, 2013.

That was when MacAuley decided to approach Jeffrey Light, an attorney who works on police misconduct issues, with her suspicions. Light and his law partner Sean Canavan began searching for evidence to peg Rizzi as an undercover police officer.

The trickiest part was establishing Rizzi’s real name. But on @snufftastic, she let clues drop.

On August 2, 2012, she Tweeted, “They used to call me No Sweat Nico because no matter how hot it was at academy, I never sweat.”

Light and Canavan did a public database search of all police officers in D.C. and found only two named Nicole; one was Rizzi. Photos on “Nicole Rizzi”’s Facebook account matched those on the @snufftastic Twitter and Instagram.

Moreover, a post on Rizzi’s since-deleted Tumblr account seemed to indicate that Rizzi worked undercover.

In response to a post from a reader asking her how flexible her dress code was as a police officer, Rizzi said she wore “ordinary clothes,” but made a distinction between her position and that of a “plainclothes” patrol cop: “In the position I’m in, it’s beneficial to wear ordinary clothes. Plainclothes assignments too, you wear what would blend in.”

What banks usually do to other people?

Make them Not Read your fine prints

What can you do to bank?

The idea of beating the banks at their own game may seem like a rich joke, but Dmitry Agarkov, a 42-year-old Russian man, may have managed it.

Unhappy with the terms of an unsolicited credit card offer, he received from online bank Tinkoff Credit Systems, Agarkov scanned the document, wrote in his own terms and sent it through.

The bank approved the contract without reading the amended fine print, unwittingly agreeing to a Zero percent interest rate, unlimited credit and no fees, as well as a stipulation that the bank pay steep fines for changing or canceling the contract.

Agarkov used the card for two years, but the bank ultimately canceled it and sued Agarkov for $1,363.

The bank said he owed them charges, interest and late-payment fees.

A court ruled that, because of the no-fee, no-interest stipulation Agarkov had written in, he owed only his unpaid $575 balance.

Now Agarkov is suing the bank for $727,000 for not honoring the contract’s terms, and the bank is hollering fraud.

The bank signed the documents without looking. They said what usually their borrowers say in court: ‘We have not read it,’” Agarkov’s lawyer said. The shoe’s on the other foot now, eh? [Source]

Trending topic: dmitry agarkov bank | Click to see more on msnNOW.com


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August 2013
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