Adonis Diaries

Archive for January 27th, 2014

Little has Egypt to celebrate this January 25, 2014

CAIRO — As Egypt’s interim president and ministers of defense and interior celebrated the third anniversary of the January 25 Revolution, countless authors and TV show hosts continued to smear the uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak’s dictatorship.

On this day in 2011, Egyptians took to the streets and called for an end to decades of torture, killings and injustice, but now these authors and TV hosts accuse the revolution’s youthful participants of disloyalty, espionage and call for crushing those who dare criticize the police.

Three years after the uprising that toppled Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Egypt is more polarized than ever.
Author Mohannad Sabry Posted this January 23, 2014
A couple of hours after the celebration aired on national TV — as I was in a taxi heading to Cairo’s Zamalek neighborhood — a radio news program received a call from a top official of the Beni Suef governorate, commenting on a militant attack at a checkpoint on Jan. 23 that killed five police officers.

A woman mourns during the funeral of 5 Egyptian policemen who were killed when masked gunmen on motorbikes opened fire on a checkpoint, Beni Suef, Jan. 23, 2014. (photo by REUTERS/Al Youm Al Saabi Newspaper)

“This terrorist attack is an attempt against the harmony and unity shown through the constitutional referendum, but it will only make us more persistent in our fight against terrorism,” said the official.

His comment was followed by random calls from listeners pledging to join the Jan. 25 celebrations in Tahrir Square and in every major square across the country. They called for celebrations in all Egypt’s squares — the squares that are remembered for being the sites of bloody confrontations over three years of unrest.

Celebrating a constitution that never satisfied the wishes of the dead youth and was boycotted by those who are still alive,” said the cab driver. “What a pity!”

I looked at the driver, a grim man likely in his late 50s, and said, “If the radio audience heard us say that, we would be accused of disloyalty and supporting a terrorist organization.”

That’s why I keep my mouth shut. I wouldn’t have hissed if I hadn’t seen that smirk on your face,” said the driver without looking at me.

I don’t know if the driver took me for a Muslim Brotherhood member because of the smirk, but it didn’t really matter. Members of the April 6 Movement, secular activists, high school students and even foreign correspondents are in Egyptian jails along with hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood officers and members.

The conflict between the government official’s comment on “harmony and unity” and the taxi driver’s confession to keeping his “mouth shut,” summed up the collective analysis of 3 Egyptians that I interviewed over the past three years.

I saw Egypt’s developments through their experiences, along with dozens of other activists and apolitical people.

The first was Mai Raafat, a woman in her early 30s who organized a campaign for securing medical treatment for the victims of the January 25 Revolution. Rafaat connected me with several victims, one of whom I featured in an article I wrote on the first anniversary of the revolution.

Back then, Rafaat’s campaign assisted dozens who were injured during the violent confrontations of January 2011, and provided aid for the families of dead protesters. Some of the volunteers running the campaign alongside Rafaat were themselves injured victims of the revolution.

Speaking to Rafaat by phone on Jan. 22, she wasn’t the enthusiastic and optimistic person I met in 2012. Instead, she was pessimistic and resentful as the revolution’s anniversary approached.

“Some of the victims continue to receive aid from nongovernmental organizations. Some lost hope in finding a job due to their disabilities and others prefer to live on minimal aid than take the few jobs offered by the government or outsourced by the organizations,” said Rafaat.

“We tried to resurrect the campaign in recent months but were shocked to see people refusing to donate blood because the victim we were trying to help was injured in the dispersal of the pro-[Mohammed] Morsi sit-in last August,” she said.

Rafaat’s words reminded me of Gaber Sayyed, a January 2011 victim whose surgery was canceled because pro-Mubarak nurses refused to treat him.

“They were humiliating me for being an [anti-Mubarak] protester,” he told me in a January 2012 interview at his house, where he was bedridden in a thigh-high cast autographed by his friends. One note read: “The police are thugs.”

As for Rafaat, she was in a position similar to  the taxi driver’s: “Isolated, because if I defend an injured member of the Muslim Brotherhood, or am sympathetic to them, I would be accused of disloyalty and being a member of [a] terrorist organization.”

The second was Fouad Mokhtar, a private company employee who paid $600 to print a massive poster emblazoned with the names and photos of slain protesters. His poster was hung on the facade of a Tahrir Square building during the 18 days of the uprising, then pulled down and spread in the middle of the square before it disappeared.

Mokhtar, a 32-year-old who joined the protesters in Tahrir Square in January 2011, decided to boycott the constitutional referendum held less than two weeks ago. “I believe the referendum was a despicable show that I would have never taken part of,” said Mokhtar.

He recalled a story of a non-voter who was attacked by several supporters of the constitution in front of a polling station in Cairo’s southern district of Maadi.

“He was physically attacked by other citizens as the military and police personnel securing the polling station watched, just because he revealed his intention to vote against the constitution because it allowed military trials of civilians,” said Mokhtar. He said that Jan. 25, 2014 “will be a continuation, not a celebration.”

“This is a continuation of January 2011, not an anniversary,” he stressed.

The last of the three people I interviewed — who were all fierce critics of Mubarak, Morsi and the current interim, military-backed regime — is a Bedouin tribesman and Sinai activist who refused to have his name mentioned.

The revered tribesman, who took part in organizing the anti-Mubarak protests in North Sinai during the 18 days of protests, fled North Sinai after his house was shelled in the wide-scale military operation that kicked off in the aftermath of Morsi’s ouster on July 3, 2013.

This man who I met with countless times, spending several nights at his house in a remote North Sinai village — before it was destroyed along with dozens of Bedouin homes in September 2013 — spoke with me via the Internet and refused to reveal his location.

“There is no place for moderate speakers now. The stage is reserved for fanatics and propagandists of the military and the Muslim Brotherhood. The remnants of Mubarak’s regime are waging war on any form of change since 2011.”

He said, “Every drop of blood worsens the situation and further divides the country. Neither the constitution nor the anniversary and celebrations will absorb the anger of anyone who suffered injustice and remains without compensation, if not further violated.”

The last time we spoke was a few days after his house was destroyed last September. Back then, he told me that his house “is not the main issue. I could rebuild the house again, but what seems impossible is refilling the widening gaps between different sectors of the Egyptian people, and other gaps between the people and the state.”

Two days ago, he said he is “afraid Egypt is pacing toward another phase of civil strife, not nationwide celebrations.”

Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/01/egypt-jan-25-anniversary-no-celebration.html##ixzz2rQpDzsJJ

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Social experiment on perception, taste, and priorities: Joshua Bell playing at a metro station in Washington DC

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played 6 Bach pieces for about 45 minutes.

During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

"A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.</p><br />
<p>Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.</p><br />
<p>A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.</p><br />
<p>A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.</p><br />
<p>The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.</p><br />
<p>In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.</p><br />
<p>No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.</p><br />
<p>Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.</p><br />
<p>This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?</p><br />
<p>One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:</p><br />
<p>If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?"</p><br />
<p>Share if you took the time to read this :)
“Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.
A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk. A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.
The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children.
All the parents, without exception, forced their kids to move on.
In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while.
About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32.
When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it.
No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.
No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.
Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100. This is a real story.
Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people.
The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty?
Do we stop to appreciate it?
Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?
One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:
“If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?
(If the artist was a Rock and Roll singer, people would recognize the person, even if he didn’t sing) 

Dieudonné: “I have been a Mossad agent since 2003”

In a previous post I described the controversy surrounding the black French humorists https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2014/01/16/quenelle-de-dieudonne-mbala-mbala-nazi-reverse-salute-who-is-he-and-zemmour-position/

The French authorities banned all the theater representations and gathering of Dieudonne on the basis of exacerbating anti-semitic sentiment.

In a press conference at the Théâtre de la Main d’Or, Dieudonné confirmed that he was an Israeli agent for the last 10 years.

He admitted that by the end of 2002 that he learned to be a descendants of the Ethioean Falashas Jews, most of them have been transferred to Israel 4 decades ago, and now live as third rate citizens. 

Israel contacted him and the spying resumed on French citizens.

Goal? Infiltrate “anti-semite” groups and weaken them financially…

And the Mossad retrieved 50% on Dieudonne’s shows and sold articles

Woody Allen on Dieudonné:

1.”He says that he is not Jew… But he is”

2. “The uncontested Jewish humorist of all time… In line with Jewish tradition of mocking their own communities…”

It would be interesting to know the saga of Mbala’s parents: Was his father originally a Falaja Jew who immigrated to and settled in Cameroon? Was his mother originally a French Falaja Jew?

And how the Mossad tampered with documents and concocted a credible story to convince Dieudonne?

Has DMbala read the horror stories of how the Ethiopian “Jews” were transferred to Israel? https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/horror-transfer-story-ethiopian-jewish-falasha-trips-to-israel/

The French text:

L’affaire Dieudonné  prend un tour nouveau.

Ce matin, l’humoriste Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, au cœur de la polémique, organisait une conférence de presse surprise au Théâtre de la Main d’Or.

Le comédien a révélé qu’il travaille en réalité depuis plus de 10 ans pour les services de renseignement israéliens. Sa mission : infiltrer les réseaux antisémites de France afin d’obtenir le maximum d’informations sur eux tout en les affaiblissant financièrement.

Le déclic de 2002

Il est 10h15 ce mardi. Les portes du théâtre de Dieudonné s’ouvrent pour laisser passer une nuée de journalistes et de fans anonymes. La salle sature de monde puis l’artiste controversé apparaît sur scène, la mine sérieuse. Pas de blagues ni d’attaques contre la communauté juive. Calmement il prend la parole :

« Fin 2002 j’ai découvert par hasard que j’étais l’un des descendants des Falashas, ces juifs éthiopiens. J’ai mis un an à m’en remettre… Puis je l’ai accepté et j’ai finalement décidé de savoir comment je pouvais aider ma communauté, mon peuple. C’est à ce moment que le Mossad m’a contacté pour me proposer un CDI. »

L’agence de renseignement israélienne réfléchit à un moyen d’utiliser cette nouvelle recrue. Quelques semaines plus tard, le Mossad propose à l’humoriste de devenir « un aimant à antisémites » en se faisant lui-même passer pour une personnalité anti-juive sous couvert d’anti-sionisme.

Dieudonné : « Je travaille pour le Mossad depuis 2003 »

Dieudonné

L’affaire Fogiel

Pour lancer cette opération tout à fait unique, le Mossad et Dieudonné doivent frapper un grand coup. Ce sera le fameux sketch de Dieudonné chez Fogiel en décembre 2003 dans lequel il incarne un colon israélien extrémiste effectuant ce qui ressemble à un salut nazi. Une performance qui, en réalité, a été écrite et répétée en toute discrétion à Tel-Aviv un mois avant son passage à l’antenne.

Après sa prestation chez Fogiel, la machine est lancée. Dieudonné enchaîne les déclarations chocs en qualifiant la Shoah de « pornographie mémorielle » ou en attaquant de nombreuses personnalités de confession juive.

Le 26 décembre 2008, ce dernier fait même monter sur scène l’écrivain négationniste Robert Faurisson, suscitant une levée d’indignation : « A la base je trouvais ça too much et pas très drôle mais les ordres sont les ordres. Ça m’a coûté moralement mais après ça l’opération est entrée dans une seconde phase et tous les antisémites du territoire ont commencé à affluer vers moi. » explique Dieudonné lors de sa conférence de presse.

Le Mossad récolte alors un nombre impressionnant d’informations grâce au système de billeterie du Théâtre de la Main d’Or ou via les réseaux sociaux: « C’est notre meilleur élément. En l’espace de 10 ans on a récolté plus de données exploitables sur les réseaux antisémites qu’en un demi-siècle. Et puis franchement le sketch du cancer est quand même très drôle. » nous confie le porte-parole du Mossad au téléphone.

L’autre grand pilier de cette opération consiste à assécher les caisses des antisémites qui se mettent à graviter autour de l’humoriste reconverti en espion. C’est dans cette optique que Dieudonné développe un merchandising acharné en vendant tasses, t-shirts, DVD’s et autres objets à son effigie.

Un accord est même passé entre l’artiste et la direction du Mossad : le comique gardera 50% de l’ensemble des recettes en guise de notes de frais dans le cadre de son service rendu. La stratégie est payante.

Pour peaufiner la supercherie, Dieudonné s’associe avec Arno Klarsfeld, l’avocat et fils de la célèbre famille de «chasseurs de nazis ».  « Arno a accepté de jouer le jeu et de devenir mon faux adversaire. C’est un patriote. Sans lui, je n’aurais jamais pu apparaître comme l’antisémite que je suis devenu dans l’esprit des gens. »

Enfin, pour s’assurer du bon déroulement de l’opération, le Mossad dépêche également auprès de Dieudonné un officier traitant qui prendra les traits de Jacky, le pseudo régisseur du comique, en réalité capitaine dans l’armée israélienne et neveu d’Ariel Sharon. Un ingrédient de plus qui aura permis à cette tromperie d’enfumer la France entière.

Fatigué par le mensonge

Alors pourquoi arrêter cette opération de renseignement maintenant alors qu’elle semble marcher plus que jamais ? La réponse, M. M’Bala M’Bala la donne à la fin de sa conférence de presse: « Je suis un peu fatigué et j’en avais marre de mentir à toutes ces personnes qui sont devenues mes fans et que j’ai vendues au Mossad. Et puis j’aimerais revenir à mon premier amour : la comédie. Tous ces sketchs haineux sur les juifs m’ont un peu dégoûté. J’aimerais bien faire un spectacle sur les godasses par exemple. »

En cause également, les mesures prises à son encontre depuis lundi par Manuel Valls et les maires de différentes villes où Dieudonné est censé bientôt se produire: « Alain Juppé a décidé de m’interdire de jouer à Bordeaux. Si je commence à ne plus pouvoir faire mon métier qui est ma véritable passion, là cette opération doit s’arrêter. C’est la limite que je me suis fixée. »

Alain Soral est le premier dans l’entourage de Dieudonné à avoir réagi à cette révélation. L’essayiste polémique se dit en colère, trahi par un compagnon de route idéologique, mais guère étonné : « Cette révélation ne me surprend pas. J’ai compris récemment que Dieudo se foutait de notre gueule quand il nous demandait de rembourser ses amendes avant même d’avoir été condamné par la Justice. On a maintenant la preuve que même l’antisémitisme est un complot juif » écrit-il sur son site Égalité et Réconciliation.

La Rédaction

Illustration : Wikicommons / Axis for Peace

Woody Allen on Dieudonné: “The most hilarious Jewish humorist of all time…”

Alors que dans un entretien accordé au magazine Première, le réalisateur américain Woody Allen aborde son futur retour en France pour le tournage de son prochain film, le petit homme aux célèbres lunettes en a profité pour parler d’une foule de sujets.

Dans cette interview il revient notamment sur sa carrière, ses angoisses mais témoigne étrangement aussi de son admiration pour l’humoriste controversé Dieudonné. Une déclaration d’amour pour celui qu’il qualifie de « maître incontesté de l’humour juif ».

Un génie de l’autodérision

C’est donc ce surprenant aveu qui sera à retenir de cette entrevue donnée par Woody Allen à Première.

Une rencontre où celui qui est peut-être le plus illustre représentant de l’humour juif new-yorkais confie son admiration pour Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala :

« C’est un très grand, si ce n’est LE plus grand humoriste juif au monde. L’autodérision sur les Juifs, l’utilisation des stéréotypes que l’on porte sur nous-mêmes ou que les autres nous renvoient, les thèmes abordés comme l’argent, le commerce, la religion et bien sûr l’antisémitisme. Bref tous les ingrédients sont là. Dieudonné est l’archétype même de l’humoriste juif et dans ce domaine c’est un très grand. »

Une prise de position qui surprend tant le parcours du comique français a été jonché de polémiques et de scandales autour de ses attaques répétés contre la communauté juive.

Mais Woody Allen interprète cela comme un argument de plus à sa vision des choses : « Tous les grands comiques juifs se sont à un moment donné moqués de leur propre communauté. Et Dieudonné s’inscrit dans cette digne lignée. Il maîtrise l’humour juif comme personne. Alors oui je sais qu’il dit qu’il est pas juif…mais il est juif quand même… »

Une réaction nuancée de l’intéressé

C’est quelques heures seulement après la publication de cet entretien-hommage que Dieudonné a tenu à répondre à Woody Allen sur sa page Facebook en écrivant :

« Pour les amateurs de quenelles, joli glissage de barquette de Woody Allen dans Première. C’est au moins du 170 qu’il fait passer avec l’art et la manière du grand artiste sioniste qu’il est. Pour une fois que quelqu’un ose dire ce qu’il pense…J’peux vous l’avouer, physiquement, à la maison, ça zouke dans tous les sens » et l’humoriste juif de continuer en renvoyant la politesse : « Finalement au dessus c’est Woody Allen. Mes respects W, chapeau bas ! »

La Rédaction

Illustration: WikiCommons / Colin Swan / Copyleft

À PROPOS

Entre The Onion et Le Figaro, votre meilleure source d’information de la journée.

Le Gorafi est né après un conflit d’intérêts avec les créateurs du Figaro en 1826.

Jean-René Buissière, journaliste dyslexique, tente alors de créer son propre journal, transformant Le Figaro en Le Garofi. Mais, dyslexique, il écrit « Gorafi ». La faute est restée et est entrée dans l’Histoire.

Le Gorafi se veut impartial et irréprochable.

Tous les articles relatés ici sont faux (jusqu’à preuve du contraire) et rédigés dans un but humoristique. L’utilisation de noms de personnalités  ou d’entreprises est ici à but purement satirique.

All items here are recounted fake (until proven otherwise) and written in a humorous purpose. The use of names of persons or companies is purely satirical here.


adonis49

adonis49

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