Adonis Diaries

Archive for January 29th, 2014

Ways to slash your grocery bills: Be savvier

At this time of year you don’t have to look far to find a Top 10 of “how to save”,  or “be savvier”, “be more frugal”,  “Clear the Xmas credit card” etc  – but they all seem to say the same old things, many of which you’ve seen before.

Turn a blind eye on the advertisement purpose this time around.

Just diminish all kinds of detergents and their quantity for your daily usage: They are Not meant to kill bacteria, but to fool your sense of smell that it is clean .

Just select fresh food: All industrialized food have plenty of carcinogen ingredients added to them…

James posted:

10 ways to slash your grocery bills. End of.

How many times do you want to be advised “don’t go shopping on an empty stomach”, or “stick to a shopping list”…? This new list I hope is different.

It’s practical to do, it’s realistic and each item can give you genuine savings.

If you follow all 10 advices, it really could make a dramatic difference to your grocery bills.   Also, you’ll start to see why we have Aldi on our site and why we designed a mobile app that works in stores.

1.     Become a Savvy Buy addict

  • We only call them Savvy Buys if they are truly amazing deals.  We’ve done the maths for you so take advantage.
  • The numbers are black and white – there are no fancy tricks here!
  • You’ll never find this kind of information promoted by the individual supermarkets

Image      

2.   Sticking to a favourite store?  That’s so last year!

  • If you are able to, don’t stick to just one store.
  • Each store has different products on offer, plus the price guarantees offered by Tesco, Sainsburys and Asda mean that in theory you won’t miss out if certain products are at a better price in your favourite store.  Do your research first though.
  • Use Aldi for saving on those basics, plus you will find that their award winners are a steal!

3.   Become a proud cherry picker

  • One for the super organised, but the savings are huge – and this is a trend that is really catching on
  • When you plan your shop don’t choose a store.   Put your shopping list together on our site or app (see No.10)  and then see where to get each item for the best price
  • If there is something you want but it is not on offer in any of the stores, or our pricing graph shows that it is expensive at the moment – then either wait to buy it another time or try an alternative.  Whatever you do, don’t be overpaying!

Fairy poor offer

4.   Start bulking

  • Our American cousins have been doing this for years, and we should all start doing it too.
  • Use our pricing graphs to see when a price is the lowest it has been all year, buy it in bulk and store it.
  • Some classic examples of products that will suddenly appear on a great deal and ideal for bulking are: washing liquid, shower gel, tinned tomatoes, crisps, toilet paper, deodorant, toothpaste and fizzy drinks.

Image      

5.     Swap and Save

  • This is not just about swapping to the supermarkets own brands, although they are often as good as the leading brands and a lot cheaper.
  • This is about checking the unit prices of products because often you can spend more on a bigger box but save because the unit price is lower.  Somewhat alarmingly, this can sometimes work in reverse too.
  • We see many examples where you can buy two smaller boxes of a product that works out cheaper than the larger pack.
  • This all sounds like hard work, but use our site or our app and we’ll do all the comparing and make the suggestions for you – even if you are in the store.

Image    

6.    Be told instantly when your favourite products are on offer

  • Sounds too good to be true, but this is one of our most popular features.
  • Price Alerts – we have them on every single one of the 100,000+ products on our site and app.
  • Flick the little price alert button next to any product and we’ll email you the instant it goes on offer.  You can have an alert for as many products as you like.  We even have an area on our site where you can see which ones you have flicked.

Image      

7.    Don’t overpay for convenience

  • All the big supermarkets are in a race to open as many convenience stores as possible.   This is great for all of us as it gives us easier access to the products we like.
  • But beware; you are paying for the convenience.   Prices are NOT necessarily the same in the convenience sized stores as they are in the main supermarkets – you are generally paying a lot more.   They still have special offers, but again these tend to be different to what you see in the bigger shops.   So only buy the bare essentials.  Or if you are not sure, scan any product to see how the ‘big store price’ compares.

8.    Cashback on the products you normally buy

  • Cashback is great.   It soon mounts up and you can then spend it on whatever you want – rather than most loyalty schemes, vouchers or other bonuses where most rewards have to be spent or ‘redeemed’ in the place you earned them
  • It won’t make you rich, but getting a few pounds back on products you would normally buy anyway is a nice bonus.
  • We give it away on many products on our site, but did you know we also have it on our app for products you buy in actual stores?   We don’t care where you shop, we just want you to save.

9.    Don’t be caught out, never assume it’s a good deal just because it’s ‘on offer’

  • I’m a sucker for offers.  I like a deal as much as the next person.  So in store I look out for the big posters, the giant ‘Save’ messages, and the bright promotional ends.  When online I go straight to the offers section and look for the price cuts.  But do you realise that not is always what it seems?
  • Ever seen a product and thought that it’s always on offer?  Me too.  Always check the pricing graphs to see the average price of a product across the previous year.  You may find that the offer price you are drawn to is actually similar or more expensive than the average price!
  • The other pitfall is that the special offer you like may be on an even better deal in another supermarket, or worse still cheaper at normal price in another store!

Image    

10.    mySuperlist – all the savings tips rolled into one

  • A portable money saver.  Your very own offer checker, budget manager, list manager, cashback earner, and swap & save searcher.
  • This is undoubtedly the best way to achieve most of the other savings tips on this list.   It’s like having every single store in your pocket, but with a friendly assistant showing you the best (and worst) deals, what to buy from each store, checking prices for you, what to swap and save.  It will even carry your shopping (okay, not yet!)
  • Here is a link to the android version and iphone version.

Image

There you have it – our top 10.  We don’t care where you shop; neither do we care if it is online, in-store or both.   We don’t work for any retailers and we don’t charge anyone for the features we offer mentioned above or for downloading and using our app.    We just want to help consumers spend less and never overpay – which has been our mission now for over eight years.

Have a savvy year!  (If you have enough money to save)

Advertisements

Brown spills, sewage dump…: Beirut, Na3meh, Khaldeh…

For over 15 years, Sukleen (one of the Hariri clan company) has been renewing its contract with the government without bidding procedures and used open air dumps for its garbage collection enterprise.

Sukleen has been charging the municipalities $140 a ton of garbage and paid directly from the municipality fund (like taxes on payrolls), while the few private providers allowed to work and independent municipalities with their own system are paying $40 a ton.

Saida had amassed a hill of garbage and the municipality is fooling us that this hill will become a green garden for the citizens, eventually.  With potential perspectives and architectural plans… to back it up.

In Na3meh, the people have been suffering from increased cancer problems, living in an environment of constant stench. They endeavored to sit-in and prevent any more trucks to empty garbage.  The government has again promised to resolve this problem within two years...

Brown spills of Khalde

It’s a nasty sewage dump- mainly flowing from southern Beirut, Khaldeh and the suburbs like Aramoun/Bchamoun/Choueifat…

Noticed most of your recent posts have to do with that short trip you took to Jordan- best way to learn about Lebanon is to leave it for a few days every couple of weeks- refreshes your perspective

In addition to the landfill crisis on Beirut’s streets–covered on this blog yesterday— there appears to be a heavy dose of brown stuff spewing into the Mediterranean near Beirut Airport, as seen in these pictures I took a couple of days ago.
You can see the runway at the top right. And the output point appears to be near a sea resort near Khalde, a few hundred meters before the Ouzai tunnel running underneath the tarmac.
Zooming in on the same area in Google Maps, the brown substance appears to come from very close to this resort, near a green area, before being flushed out to sea via a short canal:
Zoom out and you can see the extent of the damage across the coastline:

But these satellite images could be quite dated– in some parts of Beirut I have noticed Google earth images to be 2-3 years old.

Judging by my current airplane window shots, could this mean that the slime has been pumped out constantly for 3 years or even much longer?
No wonder Sidon and Khalde are not safe places to swim.

En reponse a M Nehmat Frem ce soir sur telelumiere qui a specule qu'uniquement 15% des libanais seraient capables de trier leurs dechets, j'aimerais preciser qu'entre les annees 1996 et 1998 les habitants de Bsharri furent les habitants du premier village au Liban a trier leurs dechets a la source (c.a.d chacun dans sa maison). En effet environ 80 % des habitants avaient participe au tri des dechets organise par le Comite de Sauvergarde de l'Environnement de Bsharri, projet que la municipalite de Bsharri avait malheureusement refuse de reprendre lors de sa reprise de pouvoir en 1998. Avec de la bonne volonte, de la patience et du courage, rien n'est impossible M. Frem.
In response to Ne3mat Frem who speculated that only 15% of Lebanese (meaning municipalities, baladiyat?) are able to sort out their garbage… I would like to remind M Frem that between 1996-98 the citizens of the town of Bsharreh were the first to sort out their garbage at the source, their homes.
Indeed, 80% of the inhabitants participated in the project Safeguarding the Environment Committee. Unfortunately, the next municipality refused to take up that project.
With will, patience and courage, nothing is impossible.
The French text posted by Habib Rahmet:
En reponse a M Nehmat Frem ce soir sur telelumiere qui a specule qu’uniquement 15% des libanais seraient capables de trier leurs dechets, j’aimerais preciser qu’entre les annees 1996 et 1998 les habitants de Bsharri furent les habitants du premier village au Liban a trier leurs dechets a la source (c.a.d chacun dans sa maison). En effet environ 80 % des habitants avaient participe au tri des dechets organise par le Comite de Sauvergarde de l’Environnement de Bsharri, projet que la municipalite de Bsharri avait malheureusement refuse de reprendre lors de sa reprise de pouvoir en 1998. Avec de la bonne volonte, de la patience et du courage, rien n’est impossible M. Frem.

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

Blog Stats

  • 1,265,621 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 652 other followers

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: