Adonis Diaries

Archive for May 5th, 2014

Peace talk Negotiation? 9 months of Settlement Development

Peace Now published this April 29, 2014

9 Months of Talks, 9 Months of Settlement Development

29/4/14

During the 9 months of Secretary John Kerry’s efforts in the region, the Netanyahu Government promoted plans and tenders for at least 13,851 housing units in the settlements and East Jerusalem – 
an average of 50 units per day and 1,540 units per month.

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The 13,851 units include:

Tenders for 4,868 units – 2,248 of them in West Bank settlements and 2,620 units in East Jerusalem. (The were also tenders for another 1,235 units in re-issued tenders, where the tenders are calls for bids to buy units that weren’t sold in previous tenders).

Promotion of plans for 8,983 units – 6,561 of them in West Bank settlements and 2,422 in East Jerusalem.

How the Berlin Wall compares to Israel's Apartheid Wall in the West Bank...

How the Berlin Wall compares to Israel’s Apartheid Wall of Shame in the West Bank… (The UN ordered the demolition of this wall, but Israel doesn’t give a shit of the opinion of world community)

The plans were in all West Bank areas:

Plans for 4,793 units in isolated settlements (73%)

Plans for 1,768 units in settlements closer to the Green Line (27%)

The average yearly number of tenders was 4 times higher compared to previous years:

Doubling the number of construction Starts:

According to the Israeli CBS data, in the second half of year 2013, some 828 new units were started to be built in the settlements, while at the equivalent time in 2012, only 484 units started. (the CBS data does not include the first three months of 2014).

New Settlements and Outposts:

Two new outposts were established – the Brosh outpost at the Jordan Valley and Givat Eitam, south of Bethlehem.

A New settlement at the heart of the City of Hebron was established for the first time since the 80’s.

Four outposts were legalized by promoting plans for them: Nahalei Tal and Zayit Ra’anan (near Ramallah), Givat Sal’it (in The Jordan Valley) and Elmatan (near Qalqilya).

A new settlement was founded, when 60 families moved in to live in the settlement of Leshem near Salfit.

In East Jerusalem – two big tourist projects in the Palestinian neighborhood of Silwan were promoted (the Kedem compound and the Spring House), and the National Park at the lands of Issawiya was approved.

In addition, the Ministry of Housing published tenders for preparing plans for 24,000 units in several settlements in the West Bank, including in E1. Following the publication by Peace Now, the tenders were cancelled.

Peace Now: Not only that the construction and the announcements of settlements were destructive for the American efforts and for the faith between the two sides, it also created facts on the ground that proved more than anything else that the Netanyahu Government did not mean to go for a two states solution but rather acted in order to strengthen the Israeli control over the Occupied Territories. 
List of tenders and plans according to settlement:

Units (Plans)

Settlement

Units

Tender No.

Settlement

60

Alon Shvut

36

346/2012

Beitar Illit

48

Beitar Illit

117

365/2012

Ariel

334

Kfar Adumim

92

91/2013

Ma’ale Adumim

28

Alfei Menashe

149

96/2013

Efrat

72

Elkana

30

4/8/13

Beit El

494

Givat Ze’ev

283

38/2013

Elkana

732

Modiin Illit

2

39/2013

Ma’ale Adumim

37

Elmatan

196

90/2013

Karnei Shomron

844

Ariel

102

103/2013

Givat Ze’ev

27

Beit Arye

18

162/2013

Ariel

160

Yakir

80

252/2013

Adam

277

Alei Zahav

112

274/2013

Ma’ale Adumim

694

Leshem

238

275/2013

Beitar Illit

19

Kiryat Netafim

1

302/2013

Alfei Menashe

22

Karnei Shomron

1

303/2013

Elkana

31

Almog

208

יש/2014/1

Efrat

496

Beit El

24

יש/2/2014

Beitar Illit

90

Bracha

102

יש/3/2014

Imanuel

125

Givat Sal’it

86

יש/4/2014

Karnei Shomron

234

Galgal

68

יש/5/2014

Alfei Menashe

559

Talmon

40

יש/6/2014

Ariel

48

Tene

75

יש/9/2014

Adam

38

Kochav Yaacov

19

יש/10/2014

Efrat

230

Maon

169

יש/11/2014

Elkana

52

Nokdim

160

82/2013

Pisgat Ze’ev

250

Ofra

80

84/2013

Har Homa

65

Shavei Shomron

130

85/2013

Har Homa

495

Shilo

23

86/2013

Pisgat Ze’ev

6,561

Total

397

108/2013

Gilo

311

273/2013

Gilo

387

293/2013

Ramat Shlomo

182

ים/7/2014

Pisgat Ze’ev

294

ים/8/2014

Ramot

600

ים/12/2014

Ramat Shlomo

56

ים/16/2014

Neve Yaacov

4868

Total

Settlements promotion during the talks – Timeline https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2014/05/01/timeline-of-settlements-promotion-by-israel-during-the-peace-talks-negotiation-with-palestinian-authority-part-2/

Pennsylvania Dialect: Where Yinz At?

The 4 hour and 46 minute drive from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh is marked by several views: barns, oddly timed roadwork projects, 4 tunnels that lend themselves to breath-holding competitions, turnpike rest stops featuring heat-lamped Sbarro slices and overly goopy Cinnabon.

But perhaps the most noteworthy or useful hallmark of that road trip is all the bumper stickers that one spies along the way.

Illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo

From Center City Philly to about Reamstown, it’s all Eagles and Phillies and Flyers stickers.

Then there’s a 150-mile stretch of road where anything goes. Penn State paraphernalia, Jesus fish, and stickers about deer hunting mix with every other form of car commentary to create a hodgepodge that predominates until about Bedford.

From there, it really is all Steelers stuff. And for those who make this drive fairly often, that bumper sticker progression serves as an old-school GPS.

Of course, you’ll also spot stickers referencing cheesesteak lingo, as well as those emblazoned with “N’AT,” on this trip. And if you’re from out of state and decide to rest-stop query the owner of a car bearing one of those stickers, within the first few words of that person’s spoken response you’ll realize why linguists love the Keystone State.

Pennsylvania, in case yinz didn’t know, is a regional dialect hotbed nonpareil.

A typical state maintains two or three distinct, comprehensive dialects within its borders. Pennsylvania boasts five, each consisting of unique pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar elements.

Of course, three of the five kind of get the shaft—sorry Erie, and no offense, Pennsylvania Dutch Country—because by far the most widely recognized Pennsylvania regional dialects are those associated with Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

The Philadelphia dialect features a focused avoidance of the “th” sound, the swallowing of the L in lots of words, and wooder instead of water, among a zillion other things.

In Pittsburgh, it’s dahntahn for downtown, and words like nebby and jagoff and yinz. But, really, attempting to describe zany regional dialects using written words is a fool’s errand.

To get some sense of how Philadelphians talk, check out this crash course clip created by Sean Monahan, who was raised in Bucks County speaking with a heavy Philly accent.

Then hit the “click below” buttons on the website for these Yappin’ Yinzers dolls to get the Pittsburgh side of things, and watch this Kroll Show clip to experience a Pennsylvania dialect duel.

According to Barbara Johnstone, a professor of English and linguistics at Carnegie Mellon University, migration patterns and geography deserve much of the credit (or blame) for the variety of speech quirks on display in Pennsylvania.

A horizontal dialect boundary that roughly traces Interstate 80 spans the length of the state. The speech and vocabulary of those living north of that line of demarcation, she says, were influenced by those who migrated into the U.S. through Boston mainly from the south of England. “Whereas the people in the rest of Pennsylvania below that tended to come to the U.S. from Northern England and arrived in Philadelphia and other places along the Delaware Valley,” Johnstone says. “They came from Northern England and Scotland and Northern Ireland.”

Those living north of I-80 have historically used different words for certain things than those living in the southern half of Pennsylvania—pail vs. bucket, for instance. And the pronunciation of various vowel sounds north of the boundary doesn’t align with how those vowels are pronounced in other parts of the state. “Rot can sound, to south-of-I-80 ears, like rat,” she adds, “or bus, like boss.”

Illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo

Illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo

Settlement in western Pennsylvania began to pick up around the time of the American Revolution, and those who set down roots in the area—predominantly Scotch-Irish families, followed by immigrants from Poland and other parts of Europe—tended to stay put as a result of the Allegheny Mountains, which bisect the state diagonally from northeast to southwest.

“The Pittsburgh area was sort of isolated,” says Johnstone. “It was very hard to get back and forth across the mountains. There’s always been a sense that Pittsburgh was kind of a place unto itself—not really southern, not really Midwestern, not really part of Pennsylvania. People just didn’t move very much.”

The result was a scenario in which—with some exceptions, such as the transfer of the word hoagie from Philly to Pittsburgh—the two dialects could develop and grow independently. Fast-forward 250 years or so, and people from Pittsburgh are talking about “gettin’ off the caach and gone dahntawn on the trawly to see the fahrworks for the Fourth a July hawliday n’at,” while Philadelphia folks provide linguistic gems like the one Monahan offered up as the most Philly sentence possible: “Yo Antny, when you’re done your glass of wooder, wanna get a hoagie on Thirdyfish Street awn da way over to Moik’s for de Iggles game?”

He deciphered the easy elements—like “Antny” (Anthony), “hoagie” (submarine sandwich), “Iggles” (the Philadelphia Eagles)—before transitioning to the more upper-level material. “We have this very unusual grammar quirk with the word done,” Monahan explains. “When you say ‘I’m done’ something, it means the task is done. The rest of the country would say ‘I’m done with my water.’ But if I say ‘I’m done with my water’ in Philadelphia, that would mean I’ve had some, and I don’t want to finish the rest. If I say ‘I’m done my water,’ that means I’ve drunk all of it. They mean two different things.”

Illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo

Illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo

That’s not really the case anywhere else in the country. There also aren’t many places, he adds, where people refer to someone named Mike as “Moik” in conversation. “That ‘oi’ is what I would call the defining Philadelphia sound in the way that the Philly accent is today,” Monahan says.

As for “Thirdyfish Street”? That’s “Thirty-fifth Street” to you and me. Philadelphians often replace “th”s in words with other sounds and “everything just winds up getting all blurred together.”

According to University of Pennsylvania linguistics professor William Labov, the Philly dialect represents a tug of war between the city’s connections to, and influences from, different parts of the country.

“I think Philadelphia is torn between its northern and southern heritage,” Labov says. The result is a regional dialect that combines many influences to form a one-of-a-kind manner of speaking. And, he adds, it’s a way of speaking that has become a source of pride for many residents.

Labov is currently working on a project at Penn that involves interviewing students who have graduated from Philadelphia high schools to determine their perceptions about Philly. “Most are very positive about the city and see themselves staying in Philadelphia,” he says.

“As far as the dialect is concerned, only a few points have become self-conscious. For most of Philadelphia, the general attitude is quite positive.”

How the Pyramids were built? Secret discovered…

How many of these secrets will ever be discovered?

A Secret To Building The Pyramids Has Been Discovered

The secret behind the moving of heavy and large stones to construct the Pyramids, the last remaining Ancient World Wonders, has been discovered and revealed by a team of scientists.

The scientists, consisting of physicists from the FOM Foundation and the University of Amsterdam , believe the ancient Egyptians used a ‘clever trick to make it easier to transport heavy pyramids stones by sledge’: wet sand.

 “The Egyptians moistened the sand over which the sledge moved. By using the right quantity of water, they could halve the number of workers needed,” says a statement released by the physicists.

The dampness of the sand from pouring the right amount of water significantly reduced friction and how much force was required to move the huge stones, which, on average, are approximately 2.5 tons in weight.

The physicists explain that wet sand is twice as stiff and firm as dry sand. This, and the fact that the wet sand would not pile up in front of a sledge, allowed the sledge to glide far more easily over the firm desert sand.

An intricate laboratory experiment allowed the scientists to reach this conclusion,which they believe is the most probable reason behind how the large stones were moved.

Figure 1: A large pile of sand accumulates in front of the sledge when this is pulled over dry sand (left). On the wet sand (right) this does not happen.

“The physicists placed a laboratory version of the Egyptian sledge in a tray of sand,” reveals the press release, “They determined both the required pulling force and the stiffness of the sand as a function of the quantity of water in the sand. To determine the stiffness they used a rheometer, which shows how much force is needed to deform a certain volume of sand.”

However, this should not come as a surprise: the experiments should confirm a theory many had suspected. An intricate wall-painting in the tomb of  Djehutihotep, dating back to 1900 BC, portrays a person standing in front of a sledge and pouring water over the sand just in front of it as others pull the sledge.

A large statue is being transported by sledge. A person standing on the front of the sledge wets the sand.  Source: Al-Ahram Weekly, 5-11 August 2004, issue 702

This discovery should put to rest claims that aliens or super-humans constructed the Pyramids.

Yet beyond revealing one of the world’s oldest secrets, the physicists believe the discovery could even have modern-day impacts.

Note: The picture shows that the statue was done outside the Temple ground. And the stones of the Pyramids might not have been moved in that techniques.

You may reduce by half the number of slave workers, but in other countries they surely used strong animals to do the job.

What the French navy is doing in the Black Sea? Repatriating more Jews from Crimea?

This detour by Russia allows us to judge the relative amplitude of the Ukraine crisis of 2014. This crisis translate the incapacity of the EU and USA in figuring out the “Third Europe“.

Maybe many people in the US can enumerate half a dozen of what are labeled the Western European States (the industrialized ones), and a few might still remember a couple of the newly created States in Central Europe after the implosion of Yugoslavia (Croatia, Slovenia, Serbia, Herzegovina, Macedonia…), but it is doubtful that many US citizens know anything about the other States in Eastern Europe, the “Third Europe, close to the borders with Russia and that were constellations within the Soviet Union.

How many knows of the 3 little Baltic new States, Belorussian, the States in the Caucasus (around the Black Sea) which also includes Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Romania… ? All these States that were occupied by the Ottoman Empire for over 4 centuries.

The implosion of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Berlin Wall have created a “post-Soviet Space” that was subjected to the various liberal  “choc therapies”

During Clinton and Bush Sr., the US encouraged varieties of “Orange Colored Revolutions“, especially in Ukraine and Georgia.

If Russia has been feeling humiliated and has this urge of taking matters in its hands, the European Union failed to show a little perspicacity in the treatment of the problems of the tiny emerging new States.

What the French navy is doing in the Black Sea?

Four French war navy  accompanied the destroyer and missile launcher USS Donald Cook. The bordering States of the Black Sea have signaled the arrival of these ships, otherwise, the “deployment” was decided in secrecy and not made public.

This operation was camouflaged under the NATO Active Endeavor maneuvering, which was not intended to be conducted in the Black Sea.

So far, neither the French government nor the US have made it public this navy deployment.

The two ships Dupuy de Lome and Alize, dedicated to underwater missions (missions of special under cover operations), along with anti-submarine frigate Dupleix, have manifested operational intentions.

Has France decided to be part of a military alliance with the US against Russia “provocations”?

Note 1: French text 

Que fait la flotte française en mer Noire ? - Communiqué </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Lire ce communiqué sur mon blog : http://bit.ly/1isRfbv</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>#France #USA #Ukraine #Russie

Note 2: The French politician JP Chevenement wrote:

Ce détour par la Russie permet de relativiser l’ampleur de la crise ukrainienne de 2014. Celle-ci traduit l’incapacité à penser ce que Georges Nivat appelle « la troisième Europe », après la première et la seconde, celles d’avant et d’après la chute du mur de Berlin. L’implosion de l’URSS a créé un « espace post-soviétique » voué pour l’essentiel après 1991 aux « thérapies de choc » libérales.

Les Etats-Unis, à l’époque des Présidents Bill Clinton et George W. Bush ont encouragé les « révolutions de couleur ». Si la Russie, humiliée, a voulu reprendre la main dans son « étranger proche », on ne peut pas dire que l’Union européenne ait fait preuve de beaucoup de perspicacité dans le traitement du problème « post-soviétique ».

 


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