Adonis Diaries

Archive for June 22nd, 2014

Baking Soda vs. Pharmaceutical Industry

Healthy Food Place posted this June 13, 2014

Sodium bicarbonate (Baking Soda) is probably one of the most useful substances in the world; no wonder the pharmaceutical companies don’t want doctors or anyone else to know much about it.

Sodium Bicarbonate is an important medicine – of the safest kind – and it is essential when treating cancer, kidney and other diseases.

This article is from the wonderful book “Sodium Bicarbonate – Rich Man’s Poor Man’s Cancer Treatment – Second Edition” by Mark Sircus.
Sodium bicarbonate
There are many reasons to use baking soda but one overall reason is that sodium bicarbonate is a natural substance that will not harm us, our children or the environment because is it not a chemical compound that effects nature in any kind of negative sense.

Baking soda is actually a compound that is found throughout nature, in the ocean, in the soil, in our foods, and in our bodies.

Baking soda is a neutralizer of many other compounds, which makes it extremely helpful as a medicine in the age of toxicity, which we are all presently passing through.

Life-threatening asthma in children is often resistant to treatment with bronchodilators and systemic corticosteroids. Recent research suggests that administering sodium bicarbonate—an ingredient commonly found in kitchens—in intravenous (IV) form can significantly improve pH and PCO2 in children with life-threatening asthma.

Sodium bicarbonate can save the day when nothing else can. The only other substance we can say the same is with magnesium chloride, which when injected will save a person during cardiac arrest and pull one out of a stroke if given soon enough.

There has been work going on at the University of Arizona, using bicarbonate (baking soda) as a potential treatment for cancer.

Robert J. Gillies and his colleagues have demonstrated that pre-treatment of mice with sodium bicarbonate results in the alkalinization of the area around tumors. (Raghunand 2003) This type of treatment has been found to “enhance the anti-tumor activity” of other anticancer drugs.

This is very similar to the recently published research of injecting O2 directly into tumors where such direct administration of Oxygen also facilitated the action of chemotherapy.

This year these same researchers reported that bicarbonate increases tumor pH (i.e., make it more alkaline) and also inhibits spontaneous metastases (Robey 2009). They showed that oral sodium bicarbonate increased the pH of tumors and also reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mice with breast cancer. It also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement.

Dr. Boris Veysman specialist in emergency medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Jersey describes one emergency room experience:

“The emergency department is always noisy, but today the triage nurse is yelling “not breathing,” as she runs toward us pushing a wheelchair. A pale, thin woman is slumped over and looking gray. Without concrete proof of a “Do Not Resuscitate” order, there’s no hesitation.

Click, klang, and the patient has a tube down her throat within seconds. I do the chest compressions. On the monitor, she is flat-lining — no heartbeat. I synchronize my words with the compressions and call out for an external pacemaker. Pumping … thinking: Cardiac standstill … after walking in … with cancer … on chemo. This resuscitation isn’t by the book.

Get two amps of bicarbonate,” I say to the intern. The jugular line takes seconds, and I flush it with sodium bicarbonate. This probably will correct the blood’s extreme acidity, which I suspect is driving up the potassium. The external pacemaker finally arrives. Potent electric shocks at 80 beats per minute begin to stimulate her heart. The vitals stabilize.

Bicarbonate is present in all body fluids and organs and plays a major role in the acid-base balances in the human body.

Bicarbonate deficiency is the most unrecognized medical condition on earth even though it is extraordinarily common. Problems from acid pH levels (relative deficiency in bicarbonate ions) take a large toll from human physiology and the more acid a person gets the larger the problem for cell physiology.

Every biochemical reaction is pH sensitive with enzymes being especially sensitive. Our diet plays an important role in maintaining appropriate pH levels in the body.

Most modern diets give rise to unhealthy acidic pH conditions. An imbalanced pH will interrupt cellular activities and functions to extreme levels as ph drops further.

Excessive acidic pH leads to cellular deterioration which eventually brings on serious health problems such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and heartburn.

The fact that the biological life functions best in a non-acidic (alkaline) environment speaks miles about the usefulness of baking soda.

“Uniformly, in ill patients, increasing the alkaline buffer of the tissues makes patients feel better. As mentioned above, this is particularly true in chemically sensitive patients, and can actually be a “cure” in the sense that we are increasing the body’s ability to react in a healthy way to noxious stimuli. If I use the intravenous sodium bicarbonate in such patients, it is usually given twice a week for a period of 4-5 weeks.

Sodium bicarbonate is a very effective way of directly improving celllular health by making the tissue more alkaline,” concludes Dr. Chan.

Sodium bicarbonate is the time honored method to ‘speed up’ the return of the body’s bicarbonate levels to normal.

Bicarbonate is inorganic, very alkaline and like other mineral type substances supports an extensive list of biological functions. Sodium bicarbonate happens to be one of our most useful medicines because bicarbonate physiology is fundamental to life and health.

 

Micro marketing and the called bluff

Just ten years ago, what difference could you possibly be expected to make?

How could you make music without getting picked by a record label, or help the local community garden more than showing up on Saturday to pull weeds?

How could anyone expect you to change a conversation, or raise enough cash or move the needle more than a little?

Today, armed with Mailchimp and Indiegogo and Vimeo and Meetup and a dozen other nearly free tools, you can make quite a ruckus.

You can organize a hundred or a thousand people and get them in sync with a weekly newsletter.

You can tailor goods or services or a cause to a small group of people that really want to hear about it and really want to spread the word.

You can self publish to your thousand true fans, you can host an event or a dozen events, you can enable your work to become famous to the crowd that matters.

Pick yourself.

If you care enough.

Worldview and stories

Why did McDonald’s post signs saying, “More than a billion sold”?

Why do some people pay big money to go to galas that support charities, but not donate otherwise?

Why was the guy on the plane yesterday reading The Fault in Our Stars, years after it came out?

Why are some hipsters getting their tattoos removed?

What makes so many people vote against their long and short-term interests?

How come it’s so easy to like or dislike a person, a brand or a politician before we even get to know much about them?

What’s a fair price to pay for a decent bottle of wine?

Do doctors cure people more often than alternative medicine?

Is it worth owning a Leica?

When was the last time you took something out of the library?

Do you fly a flag outside of your house?

Enough with the facts and figures and features and benefits. They rarely move people into action.

It’s our worldview (the way we acted and believed and judged before we encountered you) and your story (the narrative we tell ourselves about who you are and what you do) that drive human behavior.

We make two giant mistakes as marketers:

We believe that everyone has the same worldview, that everyone in a group shares the same biases and expectations and dreams as everyone else… and,

We believe that the narrative is up for grabs, and we ought to just make the thing we make.

An accurate description of a worldview has nothing to do with you or your mission… it’s the way a person acts without you in the room.

In the case of McDonald’s, it’s the worldview of: I don’t want to take a risk in this transaction, and one way to do that is to follow the crowd.

And the story is the (true) narrative that unlocks that worldview and turns it into action.

Tell me what your ideal customer believes, at the most emotional and primordial level, and then you can tell me the story you’ll craft and live and deliver that engages with that belief.

[More on this]

 

Secret To A Life Of Longevity?

There is no secret for a long life, you were mostly lucky that you avoided the many pitfalls of dying from car accidents, polluted environment, war ravaged countries, famine plagued region…

In any study of longevity, you have to sort out the batches in your survey according to standard of living in a community, health status when born, health care facility and preventive care before reaching age of 5, opportunities for viable education and for exercising your talents…

For equal conditions, those who continue their education during most of their life, keep reading, thinking, reflecting and engaged in social community have higher odds to live longer than those who focus solely on physical exercises and food diet programs.

There are a few life scientists who believe that the knowledge and technologies are available to lengthen life to 1,000 years within 3 decade time.  People will be functional as normal energetic people to produce and not relying on State retirement plans.

This 122 Year Old Woman

Most Important Secret To A Life Of Longevity

The primary determinant of health for the average person is thought.

Not genetics, not exercise or nutrition, but the mind.

This has been shown over and over again by the scientific fields of psycho-neuroimmunology, psycho-neurocardiology, psychoneuroendocrinology, not to mention cancer research and all the various psychosomatic disorders that have been studied.

If you doubt that thought affects health then I will be happy to have a truckload of research evidence dumped at your doorstep (at your expense) that you can take the next few years perusing. On second thought, why don’t I just relate a story.

The oldest documented person that ever lived was a French woman named Jeanne Calment who made it to 122 years, 164 days on this earth.

What was her secret? According to French researcher Jean-Marie Robine, “She never did anything special to stay in good health.”

Jeanne Calment smoked cigarettes (started at age 21), drank port wine and ate a couple of pounds of chocolate sweets a week until she was 119 years old.

She credited her longevity to laughing a lot and not getting stressed out.

She is quoted as saying “If you can’t do anything about it, don’t worry about it.”(1)

It probably didn’t hurt that her life circumstances — born into wealth and married wealth — enabled a life of ease and comfort; in other words, no mental stress.

Let’s contrast this with someone I knew personally that lived a very healthful lifestyle, ate right, exercised and could be described as being disgustingly healthy. He dropped dead of a heart attack at age 61.

Funny enough, this didn’t surprise me because I knew this person had a type “A” personality. I also recall never having seen him laugh; not even once.

Personal stories are all well and good but what does the research say about thought and the major causes of death — heart disease and cancer? The studies on thought and cardiac disease are so well known there is really no point in covering it, but what about cancer?

According to the Journal of Psychosomatic Research, “Extreme suppression of anger was the most commonly identified characteristic of 160 breast cancer patients.” (2)

In other research: “Extremely low anger scores have been noted in numerous studies of patients with cancer. Such low scores suggest suppression, repression, or restraint of anger. There is evidence to show that suppressed anger can be a precursor to the development of cancer, and also a factor in its progression after diagnosis.” (3)

In my opinion, the most interesting thing in this article is that a woman that lived 122 years smoked cigarettes for 100 years without any ill effect. Why didn’t smoking lead her to an early grave? I would say, “Because thought is more important than lifestyle.”

Notes:

1)   Retrieved April 28, 2014, from http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~wang/calment.html

2) Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Volume 19, Issue 2, April 1975, Pages 147–153

3)   Cancer Nurs. 2000 Oct;23(5):344-9.


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