Adonis Diaries

Archive for July 16th, 2014

Ceasefire for Gaza conflict? And why the war resumed worst than before?

The largest conflict in Gaza since 2012 has brought a mounting Palestinian civilian death toll (over 200 killed and 2,000 injured in 8 days of total war of extermination by Israel) and a barrage of rockets disrupting life in Israel.

Gaza conflict continues despite ceasefire proposal

WORLD – JULY 15, 2014

Copyright 2014 Reuters

COPYRIGHT 2014 REUTERS

Israeli airstrikes and rockets from Gaza continued on July 15 after the Israeli security cabinet accepted an Egyptian ceasefire deal that gives both sides 12 hours to stop attacks.

Hamas rejected the deal, calling for a commitment to a 2012 truce and an end to the Israeli blockade on Gaza. (Israel broke every commitment in the 2012 deal and reduced Gaza to a large concentration camp)

The ceasefire proposal was limited, saying that “other issues, including security issues, shall be discussed with the sides.”

The proposal makes no mention of prisoners nor of Egypt’s border to Gaza at Rafah. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was traveling July 15 to Cairo to meet Egyptian officials about Gaza.

(Sissi of Egypt is still refusing to be in direct contact with Hamas on the basis of its previous support of Egypt Muslem Brotherhood. And the Egyptians brokered the deal with Israel first without asking the input of Hamas)

Gaza Strip

JULY 15, 2014

Israel said it hit over 1,300 targets with airstrikes since its operation began on July 8.

By July 15, airstrikes had killed more than 192 Palestinians, most of whom were civilians, and injured more than 1,100 people. Many of the airstrikes have targeted homes in the densely populated Gaza Strip. (A quarter of the victims are children)

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s office said July 15 that Netanyahu has fired deputy defense minister Danny Danon (pictured) because he criticized Netanyahu’s decision to try and broker a ceasefire with Hamas, Al Jazeera reports.

The current military escalation followed the disappearance of three Israeli teenage settlers on June 12 in the West Bank. They were later found murdered after an intensive search. A Palestinian teen was subsequently murdered and burned alive, which further intensified tensions.

All 15 members of the UN Security Council approved a statement July 12 calling for a ceasefire, urging both sides to resume peace talks.

A day before,UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said “once again, civilians are bearing the brunt of the conflict,” and that 77% of the deaths were civilians.

A July 12 airstrike destroyed the home of Gaza police chief Tayseer Al-Batsh, leaving at least 18 dead and wounding 35, including Al-Batsh. It was the single deadliest attack in the conflict. By July 14, Palestinian emergency services said more people had died since operations began than in the 2012 conflict.COPYRIGHT 2014 REUTERS

A July 12 airstrike destroyed the home of Gaza police chief Tayseer Al-Batsh, leaving at least 18 dead and wounding 35, including Al-Batsh. It was the single deadliest attack in the conflict.

By July 14, Palestinian emergency services said more people had died since operations began than in the 2012 conflict.

Haaretz reported the Iron Dome rocket defense system achieved a 90% success rate at intercepting rockets from Gaza. Israel said more than 800 rockets were fired from Gaza by July 13.

No Israeli were reported dead in this conflict (compared to over 200 Palestinians). Israel’s military called up 30,000 reservists on July 11.

Israel pulled troops and settlers out of the Gaza Strip in 2005. It maintains a naval and air blockade and restricts the overland movement of people and goods across the border. Gaza is considered occupied territory by the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly.COPYRIGHT 2014 REUTERS

Israel pulled troops and settlers out of the Gaza Strip in 2005.

It maintains a naval and air blockade and restricts the overland movement of people and goods across the border. Gaza is considered occupied territory by the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly.

The last major conflict in Gaza was in 2012.

At least 130 Palestinians died, including 31 children. Hundreds of civilians were wounded.

Five Israeli civilians died and 50 were injured.

During Israel’s Operation Cast Lead in 2008-09, at least 1,385 Palestinians died — mostly civilians — and 13 Israelis died.

Discover Vintage Lebanon and Beirut: In pictures

Is Nostalgia beautiful?

The history of Lebanon touches us for reasons that go beyond a vintage tramway gloriously making its way through the old city streets.

This overpowering sense of nostalgia has more to do with being aware of living in a country that has been stabbed in the heart over and over again, and has still managed to come out of it (albeit scarred) alive – as beautiful as ever and as celebrated as ever.

Nur Turkmani posted on Listomania this July 14, 2014

Call it poetic excess, but Lebanon has always reminded me of a fierce, immensely beautiful lady that has been shot at from all directions but still manages to make her way up – time and time again. Let’s take a look back at lady Lebanon. Isn’t she lovely?


Manara, (phare) 1933. (Image via Old Beirut)


Fairouz stars together with Ihsan Sadek in Henri Barakat’s 1967 hit ‘Safarbarlek‘. (Image via NOW Media)


Good day, fine gentlemen. El-Mina (the port), year unknown. (Image via Lebnan Online)


Beirut race track, 1920. (Image via Old Beirut)


Pierre & Friends, anyone? Batroun, 1893. (Image via Habeeb)


This one is just magical. Just magical. Beirut, 1960. (Image via Souar)


Beirut covered in snow, 1920. (Image via Discover Lebanon)


More pedestrians, less traffic. Old is gold. Martyrs’ Square, date unknown. (Image via Discover Lebanon)


AUB Beach, 1940. (Image via Al Mashriq)


A car driving past Byblos Bank, date and area unknown. (Image via Josebox)


A celebration of Lebanon’s independence on November 22 in front of the Parliament building, 1943. (Image via Al Mashri)


Hamra, 1970. (Image via Old Beirut)


Beirut’s airport, 1960. (Image via Old Beirut)


Beirut, 1972. (Image via Swedenburg Blog)


Sheep, men in suits, and sassy women. Rue Georges Picot, 1958. (Image via National Geographic)

This photo was taken by Thomas J. Abercrombie for the National Geographic and its original description read, “For variety, few cities can match Lebanon’s bustling capital. Part Christian, part Moslem, Beirut combines East and West, ancient and modern. Contrasts stand out vividly in street scenes such as this on the Rue Georges Picot.”

More Listomania


adonis49

adonis49

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