Adonis Diaries

Archive for August 18th, 2014

Palestinians in Gaza, in West Bank. Iraqis in North Iraq, Syrians in north-east Syria…Ebola in Africa, famine in Sudan and Ethiopia

The King is naked

The UN is naked

Two articles in one and a comment.

Israel court forbade publishing the names of children who died in Gaza. But you can peruse the names of families who were wiped out in Gaza with names of the members.

Palestinian Families bombed at home, Gaza, July-August 2014

Initial figures as the list keeps increasing by the days

Updated Aug. 11, 2014

During the fighting in Gaza, dozens of residences were bombed while residents were at home.

The following infographic lists members of families killed in their homes in 59 incidents of bombing or shelling. In these incidents, 458 people were killed, including 108 women under the age of 60, 214 minors, and 18 people over the age of 60.

Mouse over the houses for more details.

The figures are based on B’Tselem’s initial investigation. We will continue to investigate the incidents and update the figures accordingly.

Kaware’, 9 killed

  • Muhammad Ibrahim Kaware’, 50
  • Ibrahim Kaware’, 29
  • Hussein Kaware’, 13
  • Muhammad ‘Ali Kaware’, 13
  • Abdallah Kaware’, 12
  • Qassem Kaware’, 12
  • Bassem Kaware’, 10
  • Amar Judah, 20
  • Siraj ‘Abd al-‘Al, 8

Read more: Bombing family homes of activists in armed Palestinian groups violates international humanitarian law

Hamad, 6 killed

  • Fawzeyeh Hamad, 62
  • Mahdi Hamad, 46
  • Hafez Hamad, 30 (military branch operative)
  • Ibrahim Hamad, 26
  • Suha Hamad, 25
  • Dina Hamad, 16

Read more: Muhammad Hamad, 75, resident of Beit Hanun, relates how bombing killed his family members in their yard

Malakeh, 3 killed

  • Hanaa Malakeh, 28
  • Safaa Malakeh, 6
  • Muhammad Malakeh, 2

al-Masri family, 4 killed

  • Sahar al-Masri, 35
  • Amjad Hamdan, 24 (military branch operative)
  • Asil al-Masri, 15
  • Muhammad al-Masri, 14

Nawasrah, 4 killed

  • Salah Nawasrah, 24
  • Aishah Nawasrah, 22
  • Nidal Nawasrah, 4
  • Muhammad Nawasrah, 2

al-Haj, 8 killed

  • Mahmoud al-Haj, 55
  • Basmah al-Haj, 52
  • Najlaa al-Haj, 27
  • Asmaa al-Haj, 22
  • Omar al-Haj, 21
  • Tareq al-Haj, 18
  • Sa’ed al-Haj, 16
  • Fatmeh al-Haj, 14

Read more: Muhammad Shahin recounts bombing of al-Hajs’ home, Khan Yunis refugee camp; 8 members of al-Haj family killed

al-Ghanam family, 5 killed

  • Abd a-Razeq al-Ghanam, 58
  • Ghaliya al-Ghanam, 56
  • Kifah al-Ghanam, 33
  • Mahmoud al-Ghanam, 28 (military branch operative)
  • Wisam al-Ghanam, 20

al-Batsh family, 18 killed

  • Aziza al-Batsh, 59
  • Majed al-Batsh, 50
  • Amal Hassan al-Batsh, 49
  • Nahed al-Batsh, 41
  • Bahaa al-Batsh, 28
  • Jalal al-Batsh, 26
  • Marwa al-Batsh, 25
  • Mahmoud al-Batsh, 22
  • Yazid al-Batsh, 21
  • Samah al-Batsh, 20
  • Khaled al-Batsh, 20
  • Ibrahim al-Batsh, 18
  • Yihya al-Batsh, 18
  • Muhammad al-Batsh, 17
  • Manar al-Batsh, 13
  • Qusai al-Batsh, 12
  • Anas al-Batsh, 10
  • Amal Bahaa al-Batsh, 2

Read more: Sa’eed al-Hadad relates bombing of al-Batsh home in Gaza City with no prior warning, which killed 18 family members

Abu Mu’amar family, 3 killed

  • Musa Abu Mu’amar, 57
  • Hanadi Abu Mu’amar, 26
  • Saddam Abu Mu’amar, 24

Read more: Muhammad Abu Mu’ammar describes the bombing that killed his wife, father and brother in Khan Yunis, southern Gaza Strip, 13 July 2014

al-Astal, 4 killed

  • Kawthar al-Astal, 57
  • Hussein al-Astal, 23
  • Ousamah al-Astal, 8
  • Yasmin al-Astal, 5

Read more: Yasmin (5) and Usamah (8) al-Astal, sent to their aunt’s house because of shelling, were killed when her house was bombed, 16 July 2014

Antiz, 3 killed

  • Abed Antiz, 24
  • Muhammad Ibrahim Antiz, 13
  • Muhammad Salem Antiz, 3

Abu Musalam familiy, 3 killed

  • Muhammad Abu Musalam, 15
  • Walaa Abu Musalam, 14
  • Ahmad Abu Musalam, 11

Abu Jarad, 8 killed

  • Raja Abu Jarad, 32
  • Abed Abu Jarad, 23
  • Nai’m Abu Jarad, 18
  • Ahlam Abu Jarad, 16
  • Samar Abu Jarad, 15
  • Haniyah Abu Jarad, 3
  • Samih Abu Jarad, 1
  • Musa Abu Jarad, 8 months

Read more: Shadi Taleb tells of seeing Abu Jarad family home shelled, leaving 8 dead; recounts constantly fleeing with his family for fear of bombings

a-Zweidi family, 5 killed

  • Daliyah a-Zweidi, 36
  • Mahmoud a-Zweidi, 25
  • Muhammad a-Zweidi, 19
  • Ru’ya a-Zweidi, 5
  • Nagham Mahmoud a-Zweidi, 2

al-Hayah family, 5 killed

  • Ousamah al-Hayah, 30
  • Halah Abu Hin, 26
  • Umamah al-Hayah, 8
  • Khalil al-Hayah, 5
  • Hamzah al-Hayah, 4

a-Sheikh Khalil, 5 killed

  • Yusef Habib, 60
  • Abd a-Rahman a-Sheikh Khalil, 50
  • Ayidah a-Sheikh Khalil, 45
  • Muna a-Sheikh Khalil, 44
  • Hiba a-Sheikh Khalil, 14

a-Sha’er, 4 killed

  • Salah a-Sha’er, 55 (military branch operative)
  • Laila a-Sha’er, 30
  • Hiba a-Sha’er, 15
  • Muhammad a-Sha’er, 5

Ziyadah family, 6 killed

  • Muftiyah Ziyadah, 70
  • Jamil Ziyadah, 53
  • Yusef Ziyadah, 43
  • Bayan Ziyadah, 39
  • Omar Ziyadah, 32
  • Muhammad al-Maqadmeh, 30 (military branch operative)
  • Sha’ban Ziyadah, 12

al-Halak and ‘Amar families, 11 killed

  • Su’ad al-Halak, 60
  • Hani al-Halak, 50
  • Samar al-Halak, 30
  • Halah al-Halak, 26
  • Kinan al-Halak, 6
  • Saji al-Halak, 4
  • Muhammad al-Halak, 2
  • Ibrahim ‘Amar, 12
  • Iman ‘Amar, 9
  • Assem ‘Amar, 4
  • Rahaf Abu Jum’ah, 4

Abu Jame’ family, 26 killed

  • Fatmeh Abu Jame’, 60
  • Sabah Abu Jame’, 35
  • Ahmad Sahmoud, 34 (military branch operative)
  • Shahinaz Abu Jame’, 29
  • Yasser Abu Jame’, 27
  • Fatmeh Riad Abu Jame’, 26
  • Yasmin Abu Jame’, 25
  • Razan Abu Jame’, 14
  • Jawdat Abu Jame’, 13
  • Aya Abu Jame’, 12
  • Fatmeh Taysir Abu Jame’, 12
  • Ayub Abu Jame’, 10
  • Haifaa Abu Jame’, 9
  • Ahmad Abu Jame’, 8
  • Maysaa Abu Jame’, 7
  • Sajidah Abu Jame’, 7
  • Husam Abu Jame’, 7
  • Rayan Abu Jame’, 5
  • Tawfiq Abu Jame’, 4
  • Bitul Abu Jame’, 4
  • Siraj Abu Jame’, 4
  • Soheila Abu Jame’, 3
  • Rinat Abu Jame’, 2
  • Nur Abu Jame’, 2
  • Bisan Abu Jame’, 6 months
  • Nujud Abu Jame’, 4 months

al-Hilu, 10 killed

  • Jihad al-Hilu, 59
  • Siham al-Hilu, 57
  • Muhammad al-Hilu, 29
  • Ahmad al-Hilu, 27
  • Hidayah al-Hilu, 25
  • Tahrir al-Hilu, 20
  • Najiyah al-Hilu, 15
  • Maram al-Hilu, 2
  • Karim al-Hilu, 5 months
  • Karam al-Hilu, 5 months

Daher family, 7 killed

  • Majed Daher, 55
  • Hanan Daher, 48
  • Muhammad Daher, 27
  • Adham Daher, 23
  • Nariman Daher, 13
  • Shaymaa Daher, 10
  • Dana Daher, 1

Siyam family, 12 killed

  • Kamal Siyam, 31
  • Shirin Siyam, 30
  • Muhammad Mahrus Siyam, 27
  • Sumoud Siyam, 26
  • Amin Siyam, 17
  • Ahmad Siyam, 15
  • Mustafa Siyam, 9
  • Ghidaa Siyam, 7
  • Muhammad Ahmad Siyam, 7
  • Mu’in Siyam, 5
  • Bader Siyam, 4
  • Dalal Siyam, 9 months

al-Yazji, 4 killed

  • Wajdi al-Yazji, 55
  • Safinaz al-Yazji, 50
  • Yasmin al-Yajzi, 4
  • Hatem al-Yajzi, 3

al-Qasas, 10 killed

  • Faizah Siyam, 67
  • Sumayah al-Qasas, 33
  • Aliaa Siyam, 33
  • Islam al-Qasas, 15
  • Lamyaa al-Qasas, 11
  • Nasmah al-Qasas, 10
  • Israa al-Qasas, 7
  • Arwa al-Qasas, 4
  • Muhammad al-Qasas, 4
  • Samar al-Qasas, 3

al-Kilani and Dirbas families, 11 killed

  • Ibrahim al-Kilani , 53
  • Taghrid al-Kilani, 45
  • Rim al-Kilani, 12
  • Sawsan al-Kilani, 11
  • Yasin al-Kilani, 9
  • Yasser al-Kilani, 8
  • Elias al-Kilani, 4
  • Ayidah Dirbas , 47
  • Surah Dirbas, 41
  • Mahmoud Dirbas, 37
  • Inas Dirbas, 30

a-Ramahi, 3 killed

  • Yusef a-Ramahi, 21
  • Iman a-Ramahi, 14
  • Ibtehal a-Ramahi, 4

Ahel, 3 killed

  • Ahmad Ahel, 76
  • Muhammad Khalil Ahel, 66
  • Muhammad Khaled Ahel, 19

Abu ‘Aytah family, 5 killed

  • Ibrahim Abu ‘Aytah, 66
  • Jamilah Abu ‘Aytah, 55
  • Ahmad Abu ‘Aytah, 30
  • Muhammad Abu ‘Aytah, 30
  • Adham Abu ‘Aytah, 4

al-Astal, 3 killed

  • Sanaa al-Astal, 45
  • Ashraf al-Astal, 28
  • Nabil al-Astal, 13

al-Astal, 6 killed

  • Muhammad al-Astal, 33
  • Thaer al-Astal, 32
  • Milad al-Astal, 29
  • Malak al-Astal, 24
  • Nada al-Astal, 5
  • Amin al-Astal, 4

Abu Hasanein, 3 killed

  • Salah Abu Hasanein, 47 (military branch operative)
  • Abed Abu Hasanein, 14
  • Hadi Abu Hasanein, 12

a-Darazin family, 6 killed

  • Ghasan Abu Dabagh, 32
  • Yasser Abu Dabagh, 20
  • Muhammad Abu Dabagh, 12
  • Ahmad Abu Qadus, 13
  • Abd al-Karim a-Darazin, 5
  • Muhammad a-Darazin, 3

a-Najar, 20 killed

  • Khalil a-Najar, 60
  • Samir Hussein Muhammad a-Najar, 58
  • Ghaliah Muhammad a-Najar, 56
  • Sumayah a-Najar (Abu Yusef), 50
  • Samar a-Najar, 27
  • Riham a-Najar (Abu Jame’), 25
  • Kifah a-Najar, 24
  • Iman a-Najar (a-Raqab), 23
  • Majed a-Najar, 19
  • Rawan a-Najar, 17
  • Ahmad a-Najar, 14
  • Baraah a-Raqab, 11
  • Hani a-Najar, 7
  • Mu’taz a-Najar, 6
  • Ulfat a-Najar, 4
  • Islam a-Najar, 3
  • Amir a-Najar, 2
  • Samir Hussein Samir a-Najar, 1.5
  • Ghaliah Muhammad Samir a-Najar, 1.5
  • Amirah a-Najar, 8 months

Abu Zeid family, 7 killed

  • Ahmad Abu Zeid, 52
  • Maryam Abu Zeid, 30
  • Falastin Abu Zeid, 26
  • Sabrin Abu Zeid, 20
  • Shamma Abu Zeid, 16
  • Bisan Abu Zeid, 12
  • Abdallah Abu Zeid, 5

Dheir family, 19 killed

  • Turkiyyah Dheir, 65
  • Mahmoud Dheir, 46
  • Jamalat Dheir, 40
  • Omar Salameh Dheir, 37
  • Rim Dheir, 32
  • Wafaa Dheir, 29
  • Yasmin Dheir, 24
  • Izat Dheir, 23
  • Shuruq Dheir, 21
  • Ula Dheir, 19
  • Arwa Dheir, 16
  • Omar ‘Omar Dheir, 12
  • Salameh Dheir, 12
  • Mariyah Dheir, 12
  • Muamen Dheir, 9
  • Tasnim Dheir, 8
  • Muhammad Dheir, 7
  • Ghidaa Dheir, 7
  • Yamen Dheir, 6

al-Jamal family, 3 killed

  • Shaker al-Jamal, 48
  • Marah al-Jamal, 10
  • Ahmad al-Jamal, 9

al-Far family, 9 killed

  • Salem al-Far, 58
  • Fatmeh al-Far, 55
  • Zinat al-Far, 50
  • Amal al-Far, 28
  • Jihan al-Far, 25
  • Ramzi al-Far, 24
  • Riham al-Far, 24
  • Nivin al-Far, 18
  • Hanan al-Far, 15

al-Agha family, 14 killed

  • Ahmad al-Agha, 55
  • Marwa al-Agha, 50
  • Nader al-Agha, 47
  • Nariman al-Agha, 39
  • Mustafa al-Agha, 30
  • Abd al-Hamid al-Agha, 24
  • Ata al-Agha, 24
  • Ahmad al-Agha, 21
  • Muhammad al-Agha, 18
  • Nidal al-Agha, 18
  • Daliya al-Agha, 17
  • Iyad al-Agha, 16
  • Dina al-Agha, 14
  • Fadel al-Agha, 11

Abu Jaber family, 18 killed

  • Hamdan Abu Jaber, 78
  • Anwar Abu Jaber, 35
  • Ahmad Abu Jaber, 35
  • Sumayah Abu Jaber, 28
  • Jaber Abu Jaber, 27
  • Dina Abu Jaber, 26
  • Lina Abu Jaber, 25
  • Anwar Abu Jaber, 24
  • Aishah Abu Jaber, 23
  • Fadel Abu Jaber, 19
  • Hala Abu Jaber, 9
  • Muhammad Abu Jaber, 3
  • Lin Abu Jaber, 2.5
  • Salma Abu Jaber, 1.5
  • Sama Abu Jaber, 1.5
  • Ayman Abu ‘On, 26
  • Ahmad ‘Abd al-‘Al, 24
  • Tuqa Abu ‘Issa, 1

a-Najar, 3 killed

  • Siham a-Najar, 46
  • Ayidah a-Najar (‘Abd al-Ghafur), 21
  • Sarah ‘Abd al-Ghafur, 1

Abu Khusah family, 9 killed

  • Ibrahim Abu Khusah, 33
  • Sabrin Abu Khusah, 33
  • Fatmeh Abu Khusah, 3.5
  • Yazan Abu Khusah, 3
  • Fadi Abu Khusah, 2
  • Muhammad Abu Khusah, 1
  • Rital Abu Khusah, 1
  • Jana Abu Khusah, 1
  • Shahd Abu Khusah, 10 months

Abu Shamaleh family, 3 killed

  • Abd a-Rahman Abu Shamaleh, 74
  • Anis Abu Shamaleh, 52
  • Muhammad Abu Shamaleh, 10

a-Najar, 8 killed

  • Muhammad ‘Ata Mahmoud a-Najar, 50
  • Ata a-Najar, 33
  • Issam a-Najar, 24
  • Khaled a-Najar, 23
  • Ibtisam a-Najar, 21
  • Islam a-Najar, 15
  • Rafif a-Najar, 3
  • Muhammad ‘Ataa Muhammad a-Najar, 2

a-Najar, 7 killed

  • Fawziyeh a-Najar, 80
  • Muna Isma’il Khamis a-Najar, 43
  • Muhammad a-Najar, 30
  • Jihad a-Najar, 24
  • Hamad a-Najar, 23
  • Maysaa a-Najar, 18
  • Muna Jihad a-Najar, 1

Abu ‘Amer, Breikeh, a-Najar and Mu’ammar families, 35 killed

  • Jamil a-Najar, 48
  • Wael a-Najar, 25
  • Lamyaa a-Najar, 23
  • Aya a-Najar, 19
  • Du’aa a-Najar, 18
  • Muhammad a-Najar, 12
  • Liali a-Najar, 2
  • Aya a-Ramlawi, 9
  • Subhiya Breikeh, 59
  • Faiz Breikeh, 55
  • Ahmad Breikeh, 32
  • Ousamah Breikeh, 16
  • Jana Breikeh, 3
  • Lama Breikeh, 1
  • Ahmad Mu’ammar, 33
  • Hind Mu’ammar, 30
  • Yazan Mu’ammar, 3
  • Hala Mu’ammar, 1
  • Aya Abu Sitah, 23
  • ‘Arubah Abu ‘Amer, 41
  • Muna Abu ‘Amer, 41
  • Ahmad Suleiman Abu ‘Amer, 40
  • Wadah Abu ‘Amer, 39
  • Ahmad Hassan Abu ‘Amer, 36
  • Muhammad Hassan Abu ‘Amer, 20
  • Omar Abu ‘Amer, 12
  • Muhammad Ahmad Abu ‘Amer, 12
  • Abd al-Ghani Abu ‘Amer, 11
  • Imad Abu ‘Amer, 10
  • Marah Abu ‘Amer, 10
  • Yasser Abu ‘Amer, 9
  • Issa Abu ‘Amer, 8
  • Marwa Abu ‘Amer, 5
  • Iz a-Din Abu ‘Amer, 4
  • Suliman Abu ‘Amer, 2

Balata family, 10 killed

  • Na’im Balata, 45
  • Sahar Balata, 39
  • Maryam Balata, 24
  • Du’aa Balata, 22
  • Wafaa Balata, 21
  • Hanaa Balata, 19
  • Hadil Balata, 17
  • Walaa Balata, 14
  • Israa Balata, 13
  • Yihya Balata, 4

al-Khalili family, 7 killed

  • Ashraf al-Khalili, 37
  • Nidaa al-Khalili, 28
  • Ahmad al-Khalili, 27
  • Aya al-Khalili, 23
  • Lama al-Khalili, 5
  • Dima al-Khalili, 4
  • Ziad al-Khalili, 3

Abu Shuqa and al-Bayumi, 12 killed

  • Abir ‘Amer al-Bayumi, 27
  • Abir Nahed al-Bayumi, 27
  • Asil al-Bayumi, 16
  • Hadil al-Bayumi, 15
  • Hassan al-Bayumi, 12
  • Lama al-‘Assar, 6
  • Rinad al-‘Assar, 1
  • Hassan Zaqut, 21
  • Na’meh Abu Shuqa, 43
  • Labiba Abu Shuqa, 22
  • Ilham Abu Shuqa, 18
  • Malak Shaker Abu Shuqa, 2

al-Fara family, 9 killed

  • Abd al-Malek al-Fara, 60
  • Ousamah al-Fara, 34
  • Awatef ‘Abd a-Shafi (al-Fara), 31
  • Imad al-Fara, 28
  • Nadin al-Fara, 16
  • Muhammad al-Fara, 12
  • Abd a-Rahman al-Fara, 8
  • Yara al-Fara, 8
  • Lujayn al-Fara, 4

a-Nayrab family, 5 killed

  • Ahmad a-Nayrab, 67
  • Soheila a-Nayrab, 35
  • Muhammad a-Nayrab, 14
  • Mahmoud a-Nayrab, 10
  • Muamen a-Nayrab, 8

a-Nayrab and ‘Aytah families, 8 killed

  • Arwa a-Nayrab, 43
  • Duha a-Nayrab, 16
  • Ibtisam a-Nayrab, 10
  • Ula a-Nayrab, 6
  • Ibrahim al-Manirawi, 54
  • Ibrahim ‘Ayatah, 13
  • Muhammad ‘Aytah, 11
  • Ahmad ‘Aytah, 5

a-Rumi family, 4 killed

  • Ahmad a-Rumi, 52
  • Abd a-Rahman a-Rumi, 18
  • Amin a-Rumi, 15
  • Sumoud a-Rumi, 5

Abu Taha family, 4 killed

  • Sa’diyah Abu Taha, 45
  • Muhammad Abu Taha, 24
  • Yusef Abu Taha, 16
  • Rizeq Abu Taha, 1

Wahdan family, 3 killed

  • Hatem Wahdan, 52
  • Jamilah Wahdan, 28
  • Seniora Wahdan, 22

Abu Jazar family, 3 killed

  • Amani Abu Jazar, 23
  • Firas Abu Jazar, 3
  • Amirah Abu Jazar, 2

al-Ghul family, 8 killed

  • Isma’il al-Ghul, 63
  • Khadrah al-Ghul, 60
  • Muhammad al-Ghul, 42
  • Wael al-Ghul, 40
  • Hanadi al-Ghul, 25
  • Asmaa al-Ghul, 23
  • Malak al-Ghul, 6
  • Mustafa al-Ghul, 1 month

Jamil BERRY  posted on FB: GAZA

Du temps du siège du ghetto de Varsovie, les juifs assiégés creusaient la terre parfois de leurs mains pour créer un tunnel échappatoire afin de pouvoir sortir pour ramener des vivres, car des juifs y crevaient de faim .

Gare au tunnel que les Nazis découvraient .

Cette tragédie actuelle de Gaza, est en train de montrer au monde entier qu’Israel a été loin, très loin, dans la tuerie gratuite de masse.

Méfiance : se servir de la Shoa pour justifier des tueries est à proscrire . Il est devenu très contre productif .

Il n’y a nulle ” cause à effet ”
Le “rêve” israélien de ce peuple sans terre pour une terre sans peuple, a non seulement vécu et ne trompe plus personne, et est devenu cauchemar pour la paix mondiale .

Cet israel qui s’est proclamé Roi dans la région, ce David, a créé son propre Goliath.
Les Gazzaoui ´s sont en train de montrer au monde entier que le Roi est NU.

Quand aux “United Nations ” ils étaient déjà NU
Victimes à Varsovie. Bourreaux à Gaza .

Les choses sont en train de changer en profondeur, et ne seront plus jamais comme avant…
( Jamil BERRY )

Arlette Mekhaël commented on Berry:

je ne suis ni juive ni sioniste , je ne suis ni insensible, ni assassine, je ne suis ni guerriere ni combattante, je ne suis ni haineuse ni fanatique!

Je fais la part des choses. froidement et avec réalisme. je vois et je lis trop de manipulations mensongères, ou avec des demies vérités , c est pourquoi, je ne dirais pas mon opinion sur ce conflit.

Juste une chose: ceux qui se focalisent sur Gaza et certains Palestiniens, oublient totalement le reste de l humanité souffrante , et soumise à tout un ensemble de lois naturelles ou humaines, qui les font vivre dans un gouffre sans fin , aussi insupportable que celui que vivent les gazaouis.

Maintenant c est le temps de penser aux chrétiens et aux yezedis!

En serez vous capables ou non? pas en paroles! mais en actes!

 Enverrez vous des vivres et des médecins bénévoles? des combattants pour faire taire ces démons de l enfer?

 Enverrez vous vos armées pour sauver les innocents attendant d être égorger? défendriez vous la liberté de pensée et de religion? ou simplement marcherez vous dans nos rues, avec des pancartes contre tous les islamistes radicaux du monde?

Alors vous serez humains!

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Styles of compassionate reporting that bring fruits 

Does Jon Snow’s Gaza appeal risks reducing reporting to propaganda? Hardly.

Journalists have cried before ‘something must be done’.
But they must avoid emoting? Why?
What’s so objective in reporting anyway?

Andrew Bossone posted on FB:

Journalists are expected to be the voice of conscience and at the same time to suppress that voice.

When a journalist speaks up about an atrocity, it may cause a stir.

People in the U.S. have often said the turning point of public opinion in the Vietnam War was when Walter Cronkite, “the most trusted man in America” returned from there and criticized what happened.

I don’t know how we are expected to remain silent particularly when we see an atrocity with our own eyes.

The press is hardly objective. We put our influence just by choosing stories.

Here is an interesting documentary about an artist that pointed out how the US press ignored genocide and starvation in Africa:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjvRtNPVzgs

An elderly Palestinian woman walks through ruins in Gaza
‘The horrors of Gaza have been bravely narrated by reporters fully equipped with compassion and empathy, but not wallowing in their own feelings.’ Photograph: Oliver Weiken/EPA

Faced by the horrors of Gaza, Guardian columnist Giles Fraser last week urged reporters to show more emotion, condemning calm rationality in the face of the slaughter as “a particular form of madness”.

Is this is a dangerous path?

Emotion is the stuff of propaganda, and news is against propaganda. Reporting should privilege the emotional responses of audiences, not indulge journalists.

At the same time, from a slightly different direction, Jon Snow used a Channel 4 studio, but not the channel itself, to show how reporting from Gaza had emotionally affected him. His call on YouTube was for engagement from his audience, promising “Together we can make a difference”.

The same cry that “something must be done” was heard from reporters at the beginning of President Assad’s murderous campaign to hold on to power in Syria – more muted once the full realisation dawned that what should be done was complex, and that the alternatives might be worse than Assad.

It also echoed Martin Bell 20 years ago in Bosnia, asking to be relieved of the duties of BBC impartiality, instead wanting a “journalism of attachment”.

In his appeal, Snow said the world had shown it was not that interested in the death of children in Gaza. Almost three-quarters of a million hits showed that many were interested.

But how did the audience know enough to care? Not from reporters who had put their emotions on show. Instead, the horrors of Gaza have been bravely narrated by reporters fully equipped with compassion and empathy, but not wallowing in their own feelings.

The piece that inspired Giles Fraser to his incoherent appeal that “screaming is the most rational thing to do” – Peter Beaumont’s description of a father gathering the remains of his baby son in a carrier bag – is not reported emotionally. Instead, the writing is poetic in its spare intensity. “ ‘This is my son,’ he said and nothing else, tears tracking down his face.”

The missile that entered the house made a hole “the size of a toaster”. The domestic details take us there, and when we arrive, we find Beaumont, one of the finest reporters of his generation, to be a helpful guide, not an obstacle. He is not in our way telling us how he feels.

This kind of reporting has an honourable pedigree. Of all the situations when screaming might have been the most understandable response, the enormity of the concentration camps in 1945 is high on the list. But instead, when he came to Belsen, Richard Dimbleby reported what he saw with chilling precision: “the awful, ghostly procession of emaciated, aimless people, with nothing to do and with no hope of life”.

There is one significant difference. Reporters now routinely personalise victims in a way that was not done by Dimbleby, or indeed Michael Buerk, reporting the “biblical famine” in Ethiopia in 1984. Then the dead were nameless. But Beaumont tells us that the baby in the carrier bag in Gaza is Mohammad, his father Salem Antez.

With more access to the world at their fingertips than the passive consumers of news in the past, the public demand more engagement and participation from reporters than before. Social media is full of material that is more graphic and more directly emotional than the mainstream media, in Britain at least. News organisations are responding with different ways of editing material gathered by non-professionals, as well as new ways of storytelling.

But Snow’s YouTube appeal carried an implicit message that is more threatening, at least to TV news, than Fraser’s call for emotional reporting. He considered that he could deliver this only online since it might contravene rules governing impartiality in news programmes. It resembled the homilies that used to be delivered by TV anchors such as Walter Cronkite at the end of the nightly news in the US.

These could be highly opinionated, especially during the Vietnam war, stretching the bounds of the fairness doctrine that regulated American broadcasting at the time, similar to Britain’s rules on impartiality.

Ronald Reagan’s abolition of the fairness doctrine contributed to a significant weakening of TV news in the US, releasing a flood of ignorance – a salutary warning to those campaigning for an end to impartiality rules here in order to encourage reporters to be more emotionally engaged.

• David Loyn is the BBC’s Afghanistan correspondent. His report on Afghan war crimes is on Radio 4 on Monday 4 August at 8pm


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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