Adonis Diaries

Archive for November 18th, 2014

Cherry picking tendency and Feature-Positive Effect

And the deceitful checklist

The Absence of a feature is much harder to detect than its presence: We do place greater emphasis on what exist than on what is absent.

What exist means a lot more than what is missing.

For example, we fail to appreciate the absence of wars or when we arrived safely as we reach home.

For example, articles, particularly scientific articles that “confirm” a hypothesis are overwhelmingly readily published than those that “disprove” the hypothesis as false.

Actually, no Nobel prize was awarded to scientists who proved a hypothesis was false!

Although both confirmation and falsification of a hypothesis are scientifically valuable and valid in the same rank of importance.

Actually, disproving a hypothesis is the basis for any paradigm shift in every disciple.

Otherwise, our knowledge will be stuck in the Medieval Age.

It is well known that it is our belief system that is the real hindrance to progress and change.

How can you change paradigms if not by proving wrong what is already accepted as “true”?

All disciplines brag of their outcomes.

And the professionals are well-equipped to tell us what worth it did to mankind.

And yet, the professionals always fail to tell us what they didn’t achieve, or had gone wrong, just to show us how indispensable their methods are.

This is the Pure Cherry picking tendency.

For example, drug researchers and producers of antibiotics are celebrated while the huge success of anti-smoking activist campaigns is ignored.

Administrative departments in public and private institutions never communicate what they could not achieve for the institution.

Have you ever wondered “what happened to the left-over cherries?” These far more frequent failed projects and missed goals?

Have ever attempted to double-check targets instead of computing to the nearest cent cost/benefit accounts?

Mostly, the original goal fade while tending to what is tangible and easy to compute and collecting data.

Mostly, what we do is shoot an arrow and then draw a bull’s eye around our target.

Read: The Art of Thinking Clear

For example

 

Palestinian activists cross separation wall in protest action
RAMALLAH (Ma’an) — Dozens of Palestinian activists crossed Israel’s separation wall on Friday near Qalandia checkpoint as part of a series of non-violent protest actions to demonstrate solidarity with Jerusalem.Activists used makeshift ramparts, ladders and cut through barbed wire to climb over the separation wall near Qalandia military checkpoint, which is 9 meters high.

Published yesterday (updated) 15/11/2014 16:52
Font- Font+
(MaanImages)
The action was part of a campaign entitled #On2Jerusalem that was organized by the Popular Resistance Committees.Coordinator of the popular committees, Salah Khawaja, said they attempted to enter Jerusalem but were prevented from doing so by Israeli forces, who deployed heavily in the area.

Israeli forces used live fire, tear gas canisters, stun grenades and rubber-coated steel bullets to disperse the march.

Dozens of Palestinian activists also gathered near the village of Hizma carrying Palestinian flags and shouting slogans in support of Jerusalem.

Several youths were injured as Israeli forces opened fire at them to prevent them crossing the checkpoint. The activists managed to close the road, with Israeli forces preventing settlers from traveling to the area.

Dozens of activists also demonstrated by the entrance to Maale Adumim settlement waving Palestinian flags.

“They attempted to detain us for carrying Palestinian flags,” Khawaja said. “What we did today was to emphasize that we do not have a choice but popular resistance and clashing with Israel is a part of our fight to stop Israeli crimes against Palestinians”

An Israeli army spokeswoman said there was an “attempt” to cross the wall, without providing further details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steady process for Erasing Palestine? In pictures 

In Pictures: Erasing Palestine
Palestinians fear the old stone houses of Lifta, the last deserted pre-1948 Palestinian village, will soon be destroyed.
Last updated: 11 Nov 2014

The last deserted pre-1948 Palestinian village in Israel is facing possible destruction. Located on the outskirts of Jerusalem, the village of Lifta is an empty collection of old stone houses that have fallen into neglect.

For the past 20 years, the Israeli government has pushed to destroy the remaining buildings to make room for new luxury homes, hotels, a shopping mall and a recreation park. The courts have rejected governmental requests to build, but the construction of a new railway line through the village has many thinking the end is near.

In the meantime, local Israeli Jews use Lifta as a picnic spot and swim in its ancient spring. For the few surviving Palestinians who were born in Lifta, visiting their former village brings a mix of emotions: nostalgia for an idyllic childhood spent amongst the olive groves, and bitterness at the destruction and appropriation of their homes and heritage.

Lifta’s inhabitants were systematically expelled by Israeli forces between 1947 and 1948. Afterwards, Jewish immigrants, mostly from Yemen, moved into the empty homes.

Following the Six-Day War in 1967, the Israeli government offered the Jewish residents of Lifta new homes in Jerusalem; they happily accepted, and blew up the roofs of Lifta’s houses before leaving to ensure no-one would return.

The Palestinian villages inside present-day Israel, deserted in 1948, have largely disappeared from the map. While Israel still retains around one million Palestinian residents, many fear the destruction of Lifta would erase, once and for all, the memory of those Palestinians who lost their homes when the state of Israel was created.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Before 1948, the village of Lifta had 500 houses with about 3,000 inhabitants. Half were in the upper part of the village, which has already been mostly demolished, and the other half in the lower part.

A few old houses from the upper part of Lifta remain visible today.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Ilan Shtayer – a former Israeli soldier who is now a member of “Combatants for Peace”, an Israeli-Palestinian organisation demanding an end to the occupation of Palestinian land – is part of an association called “Save Lifta”, which is fighting for the preservation of the village.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

In one of the remaining houses of Lifta, a young Israeli woman comes to have a picnic. On the wall, written in Arabic, is the slogan: “Lifta is ours, we will come back.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

An Israeli family enjoys a picnic in Lifta. When asked, they said they did not know the story of the village.

/Vinciane JacquetVinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Young Israelis bathe in the former spring of Lifta.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

A verse from a poem by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish on a wall inside one of the old homes in Lifta reads: “This land deserves life.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Since 1967, the Israeli army has been using Lifta for military exercises because the environment and rough, hilly terrain are similar to Lebanon.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Israel Jalal, who was born in Lifta, had to leave the village with his family when he was 12. He lived in the upper part of Lifta, and his childhood home was demolished a long time ago to make room for an administrative building. He used to take his boys to Lifta “to let them know it is their land”.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Palestinian woman from Gaza who was two years old when her family fled the village, and was subsequently raised in the United States. She supports the right to return.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Yacoub Odeh lived with his family in Lifta. The roof of his home was blown off by the Israeli Army in 1969, but the remains of the house are still visible. He remembers a childhood of gardens, olive groves and racing other children to school.

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/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Before 1948, the village of Lifta had 500 houses with about 3,000 inhabitants. Half were in the upper part of the village, which has already been mostly demolished, and the other half in the lower part. A few old houses from the upper part of Lifta remain visible today.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Ilan Shtayer – a former Israeli soldier who is now a member of “Combatants for Peace”, an Israeli-Palestinian organisation demanding an end to the occupation of Palestinian land – is part of an association called “Save Lifta”, which is fighting for the preservation of the village.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

In one of the remaining houses of Lifta, a young Israeli woman comes to have a picnic. On the wall, written in Arabic, is the slogan: “Lifta is ours, we will come back.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

An Israeli family enjoys a picnic in Lifta. When asked, they said they did not know the story of the village.

/Vinciane JacquetVinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Young Israelis bathe in the former spring of Lifta.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

A verse from a poem by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish on a wall inside one of the old homes in Lifta reads: “This land deserves life.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Since 1967, the Israeli army has been using Lifta for military exercises because the environment and rough, hilly terrain are similar to Lebanon.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Israel Jalal, who was born in Lifta, had to leave the village with his family when he was 12. He lived in the upper part of Lifta, and his childhood home was demolished a long time ago to make room for an administrative building. He used to take his boys to Lifta “to let them know it is their land”.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Palestinian woman from Gaza who was two years old when her family fled the village, and was subsequently raised in the United States. She supports the right to return.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Yacoub Odeh lived with his family in Lifta. The roof of his home was blown off by the Israeli Army in 1969, but the remains of the house are still visible. He remembers a childhood of gardens, olive groves and racing other children to school.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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