Adonis Diaries

Archive for April 6th, 2015

 

 

Abridged versions of Gibran’s Prophet pieces

I read the original English version long time ago. I am currently reading a French translation that I like.

The poetic prose pieces are short enough, but I am re-writing the shorter version my own style.

Al Mitra asked Al Mustafa:

“Master, what you say of children?” He responded:

Mothers, your sons belong to life.

Your children are the product of the desire for life.

You are the care taker and  the kids do not belong to you.

Your children have their own mind and soul.

Steady your arch

Bend the string with all your might.

Look far into the horizon.

Let loose of the arrow.

How your offspring evolve, you are denied to fathom their future.

Al Mitra asked: “What of marriage?”

The Mustafa answered:

Make space between your spouse: Allow the winds to dance between you

Fill the cup of the other, but refrain from drinking from the same glass

Partake the loaf of bread, but do not eat from the same piece of bread

Sing and dance together and then separate to your isolated chambers:

The cords of the lute are separate in order to deliver the better music.

The columns of the Temple are apart in order to sustain the edifice

Healthy trees do not grow in the shadow of one another.

 

And what of crimes and Punishment?

The saints and the Just cannot fly higher than the good intentions of everyone of us

The weak and bad persons cannot stoop lower than the lowest among us.

The yellowing leaf had silently informed the entire tree of its decrepitude.

 

The sinner sensed the secret assent of his community

We are walking this path:

If those preceding the file fail to remove the rock on the road, someone is doomed to stumble on it.

When someone falls, he is warning those who are coming behind him.

How could you judge fairly anyone if you had not succumbed previously to the same infamy?

How could you appreciate the remorse, which is more terrible than the act itself?

Mind you that the cornerstone is Not more noble than the stones in the foundation.

 

We enjoy enacting laws that we know are made to be transgressed.

All those people standing in the sun light, while their backs are simply forming shadows,

And see but the shadows of their laws.

What law may scare you if you know that you are Not going to stumble over the chains of another person?

 

Sacred Kadisha Valley in Mount Lebanon

La Vallée Sainte de Qadisha, ou Kadisha, est située au Nord Liban et a été inscrite au patrimoine mondial de l’Humanité de l’UNESCO.

Fortement escarpée et pentue, elle s’étend de la Forêt des Cèdres qui la surplombe et héberge le fleuve de Qannoubine qui deviendra le fleuve Abou Ali à Tripoli.

Actuellement menacée en raison de projet immobilier et du risque de passage d’une route, remettant en cause son inscription, la vallée sainte a occupé très tôt par l’Homme puisqu’on a trouvé des traces remontant au Paléolithique.

La vallee deviendra un refuge en raison des difficultés à y accéder à de nombreuses populations victimes d’exactions dont la communauté maronite dès la fin du VIIème siècle.

Ainsi le Monastère de Qannoubine deviendra même le siège patriarcal maronite au XVème siècle.

On y trouve également les ruines de monastères éthiopiens, nestoriens, arméniens, melchite et jacobites.

On peut encore aujourd’hui retrouver des traces paléo-chrétiennes. On y a d’ailleurs retrouvé en 1990, 8 momies naturellement préservées de personnes avec leurs habits et appartenant à la communauté maronite, ce qui prouve que les lieux ont encore de nombreux secrets à révéler.

Aujourd’hui, de ce passé d’ermites, on ne peut que rencontrer que le Père Dario Escobar, moine maronite venu de Colombie et qui a abandonné fortune et confort pour répondre à l’appel de Dieu pour l’inconfort d’une église et son cloitre perchés dans une grotte.

Nous vous invitons également à revoir notre infographie sur le Monastère Saint Antoine de Qozhaya.

Lire la Suite: En Image: la vallée Sainte de Qadisha au Liban http://libnanews.com/en-image-la-vallee-sainte-de-qadisha-au-liban/#ixzz3WVQC6gss

Et en cette période de fête, quoi de plus naturel que de visiter ce samedi, la vallée sainte de Qadisha à la recherche de ses trésors?

La Vallée Sainte de Qadisha, ou Kadisha, est située au Nord Liban et a été inscrite au patrimoine mondial de l’Humanité de l’UNESCO. Fortement escarpée et pentue, elle s’étend de la Forêt des Cèdres qui la surplombe et héberge le fleuve de Qannoubine qui deviendra le fleuve Abou Ali à Tripoli.

La Vallée Sainte de Qadisha, ou Kadisha, est située au Nord Liban et a été inscrite au patrimoine mondial de l’Humanité de l’UNESCO.
libnanews.com

 

Saudi financed Joint Arab Force to be headquartered in Sudan? How convenient

Khartoum to be ‘capital’ of the joint Arab force?

The farthest State in the Arab League and one of the poorest and most ravaged by civil war (for over 3 decades) and whose leader has been summoned by the International Court for crimes against humanity committed in Darfur could be selected to host the headquarter of this stupid force financed by the most obscurantist Saudi monarchy.

Alwiya Mukhtar  posted this March 30, 2015 

Analysis: Sudan’s selection as the centre of the joint Arab defence force will help end Khartoum’s diplomatic estrangement with the Arab world.
An issue that will be discussed in May.
The closing statement of the 26th Arab Summit held in Sharm al-Sheikh approved the formation of a joint Arab force, emphasising that the Saudi-led Operation Decisive Storm will continue until the “Houthi coup ends”.
But first, Sudan would have to take steps to resolve its domestic wars?A Sudanese source told al-Araby al-Jadeed that “Khartoum was selected for the task”.
However, Ali al-Sadeq, a spokesman for the Sudanese foreign ministry, said no such decision had been taken.
Sudan is strategically located at the heart of the Arab region.

Analysts believe Sudan has the necessary logistical and structural potential to host the training and leadership of the Arab force, given its strategic location at the heart of the Arab region.

However, analysts say that implementation will require Khartoum to take serious steps to end its internal political tensions and wars across the country by reaching a comprehensive peace agreement and political settlement, leading to a transitional government with the participation of all political powers, including armed and peaceful opposition.

In addition, analysts point out that the coming phase will witness Arab and international pressure and initiatives to end Sudan’s internal crisis and thus guarantee a suitable environment for the joint defence forces.

They also consider the preparatory conference, held in Addis Ababa today and attended by both the government and the revolutionary front (represented by the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North and Darfur movements, as well as the Umma opposition party, led by al-Sadiq al-Mahdi), to be a window to the awaited political settlement.

During the 1970s, Sudan was selected as a centre for the leadership of Arab forces, but this did not bring any political or economic gains to the country.

For years, Sudan has been suffering from an economic crisis, further aggravated by the separation and independence of the south in 2011, which lost Khartoum oil revenues that constituted nearly 70 percent of the general budget’s revenues.

Khartoum’s approval to host the Arab forces would end the break in relations with Arab countries, especially in the Gulf.

Thus, Sudan is expected to attract more investment.

Political analyst Maher Abul Jokh believes Sudan is the most suitable centre for the Arab forces, given its infrastructure (what that?) and the Khartoum building that hosted the UNAMID force before it moved out following the completion of its mission by the end of the transitional phase and the separation of the South.

Abul Jokh also believes it is unlikely for Sudan to relive what happened in 1973 when it was selected as a centre for Arab forces.

“Things are different now because there are real threats that prompt Arab countries to deal with them,” he said.

This is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

– See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/3/30/khartoum-to-be-capital-of-the-joint-arab-force#sthash.wX0ZWVZt.dpuf

 

 

Was Jesus Jewish by any long shot?

The Jews of Jerusalem never acknowledged that Jesus was a Jew.

Jesus never proclaimed that he was Jew.

The mother of Jesus was from the town of Qana, the district of Tyr then and now, as was all of her family.

The Temple they patronized was the Great Temple of the Carmel and it is there they celebrated their religious events.

The town of Bethlehem was the one in Galilee and not the one close to Jerusalem that was a tiny military garrison.

When Jesus ascended toward Jerusalem, it was his first visit to the city, where he would be persecuted and executed.

Kamal Nader shared this link on April 3, 2015
Edmond Melhem shared a photo to Kamal Nader‘s timeline.
'Jesus was Syrian</p><br /><br />
<p>By Dr. Edmond Melhem</p><br /><br />
<p>Was Jesus really a Jew as some scholars refer to him? According to Antun Sa´adeh, Jesus was not a Jew, but he was Syrian and a product of his Syrian social environment. Sa´adeh clearly states: </p><br /><br />
<p>Jesus was not Jewish and he had no Jewish fathers; as claimed by the composer of the Instigatory [Al-Qarawi], who denigrated him. Jesus was Syrian, who used to address people in Aramaic. </p><br /><br />
<p>In his book, Life of Jesus, Renan, asserts that “the real mother-tongue of Jesus was the Syrian dialect mingled with Hebrew, which was then spoken in Palestine”.  By the Syrian dialect Renan meant Aramaic, which was the spoken language in Palestine, particularly in the Galilee, during the lifetime of Jesus.  The Dutch Roman Catholic scholar Edward Schillebeeckx was certain about the Aramaic hypothesis when he wrote: “On historical grounds it is quite certain that he [Jesus] conveyed his message in Aramaic”.  Günther Bornekamm offers a similar view that “Jesus’ mother tongue is the Aramaic of Galilee.”</p><br /><br />
<p>According to Abraham Mitrie Rihbani (1870 – 1945) , Syria was the original home of Jesus. In The Syrian Christ, published in 1916 and reprinted 17 times between 1916 and 1937, Rihbani conducts us “into the inner chambers of Syrian life”, describing the social habits of Syria and the cultural milieu in which Jesus lived. At the start of his journey, however, he asserts, like many, that Jesus, as the embodiment of the Holy Spirit and as a preacher of God: the Father, and His heavenly kingdom, is a man without a country or nationality. He states: </p><br /><br />
<p>As a prophet and seer Jesus belongs to all races and ages. Wherever the minds of men respond to simple truth, wherever the hearts of men thrill with pure love, wherever a temple of religion is dedicated to the worship of God and the service of man, there is Jesus’ country and there his friends.  </p><br /><br />
<p>Before he presents a charming account of Jesus’ life and his characteristics as well as his teachings, Rihbani emphasizes that his modest purpose in publishing his book is “to remind the reader that, whatever else Jesus was, as regards his modes of thought and life and his method of teaching, he was a Syrian of the Syrians”. Rihbani adds: </p><br /><br />
<p>According to authentic history Jesus never saw any other country than Palestine. There he was born; there he grew up to manhood, taught his Gospel, and died for it.</p><br /><br />
<p>It is most natural, then, that gospel truths should have come down to the succeeding generations – and the nations of the West-cast in Oriental moulds of thought, and intimately intermingled with the simple domestic and social habits of Syria. The gold of the Gospel carries with it the sand and dust of its original home. </p><br /><br />
<p>In search of Jesus’ identity, scholars may provide rival answers and a multiplicity of dazzling images of Jesus. Nevertheless, the fact remains that the Jesus of history, the real Jesus, was born in Palestine; there he grew up, walked and taught. He never identified himself as a Jew and never designated himself the Son of David, but the Son of God. Sa´adeh asserts that Jesus himself refused to be called “Son of David” as the Jews wished. He adds:<br /><br /><br />
Jesus rejected all attempts to regard him a Jew related to David, in accordance with the Jewish tradition. It is not right to say the Messiah was Jewish. He is the son of the Syrian environment.'
Al-Zawba’ah by Edmond Melhem

Jesus was Syrian

Was Jesus really a Jew as some scholars refer to him?

According to Antun Sa´adeh, Jesus was not a Jew, but he was Syrian, a product of his Syrian social environment. Sa´adeh clearly states:

Jesus was not Jewish and he had no Jewish fathers; as claimed by the composer of the Instigatory [Al-Qarawi], who denigrated him. Jesus was Syrian, who used to address people in Aramaic.

(Antun Saadeh is the founder and leader of the Syrian National Social Party, established in 1931. Saadeh was executed by firing squadby the Lebanese government in 1949 after a quick trial that didn’t last 24 hours.)

In his book, Life of Jesus, Renan, asserts that “the real mother-tongue of Jesus was the Syrian dialect mingled with Hebrew, which was then spoken in Palestine”.

By the Syrian dialect Renan meant Aramaic, which was the spoken language in Palestine, particularly in the Galilee, during the lifetime of Jesus.

The Dutch Roman Catholic scholar Edward Schillebeeckx was certain about the Aramaic hypothesis when he wrote: “On historical grounds it is quite certain that he [Jesus] conveyed his message in Aramaic”.

Günther Bornekamm offers a similar view that “Jesus’ mother tongue is the Aramaic of Galilee.” (Galilee was within Tyr district jurisdiction and Herod was denied taking Jesus to court and Jesus lived all his life in the district of Tyr)

According to Abraham Mitrie Rihbani (1870 – 1945) , Syria was the original home of Jesus.

In The Syrian Christ, published in 1916 and reprinted 17 times between 1916 and 1937, Rihbani conducts us “into the inner chambers of Syrian life”, describing the social habits of Syria and the cultural milieu in which Jesus lived.

Jesus was as the embodiment of the Holy Spirit and as a preacher of God: the Father, and His heavenly kingdom, is a man without a country or nationality. Abraham Mitrie Rihbani states:

As a prophet and seer Jesus belongs to all races and ages. Wherever the minds of men respond to simple truth, wherever the hearts of men thrill with pure love, wherever a temple of religion is dedicated to the worship of God and the service of man, there is Jesus’ country and there his friends.

Before he presents a charming account of Jesus’ life and his characteristics as well as his teachings, Rihbani emphasizes that his modest purpose in publishing his book is “to remind the reader that, whatever else Jesus was, as regards his modes of thought and life and his method of teaching, he was a Syrian of the Syrians”. Rihbani adds:

According to authentic history Jesus never saw any other country than Palestine. There he was born; there he grew up to manhood, taught his Gospel, and died for it.

It is most natural, then, that gospel truths should have come down to the succeeding generations – and the nations of the West-cast in Oriental moulds of thought, and intimately intermingled with the simple domestic and social habits of Syria.

The gold of the Gospel carries with it the sand and dust of its original home.

In search of Jesus’ identity, scholars may provide rival answers and a multiplicity of dazzling images of Jesus.

Nevertheless, the fact remains that the Jesus of history, the real Jesus, was born in Palestine; there he grew up, walked and taught.

He never identified himself as a Jew and never designated himself the Son of David, but the Son of God.

Sa´adeh asserts that Jesus himself refused to be called “Son of David” as the Jews wished. He adds:
Jesus rejected all attempts to regard him a Jew related to David, in accordance with the Jewish tradition. It is not right to say the Messiah was Jewish. He is the son of the Syrian environment.

Read: https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2009/03/18/the-virgin-mary-is-from-the-town-of-qana-in-lebanon-book-review/#comment-1492


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