Adonis Diaries

Archive for June 24th, 2015

 Angelina Jolie with daughter Shiloh on a Trip to Lebanon: Visiting refugee camps

Angelina Jolie is known for her giving heart and charitable work around the world, and now she is passing those traits on to her children.

The actress took her daughter Shiloh to Lebanon on Friday to spend time with a 12-year-old Syrian girl named Hala, whom Angelina met a year ago during a trip for the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees.

“Shiloh is very aware that I hold refugee families in high regard and has been asking to come on missions and meet them for many years,” Angelina told People magazine.

“Shiloh had heard about Hala since my last visit to Lebanon, and has been wanting to meet her and her brothers and sisters.”

Hala instantly bonded with Shiloh. Hala has no parents and lives with her five siblings in a tented settlement in the Bekaa Valley.

“It was wonderful that they were able to meet, play together, and make friends,” Angelina said. “So many refugees are children. I’ve often heard them say that the most painful thing is not that they have lost their homes — it is that they have lost their friends.”

Shiloh and Hala got along so well that Shiloh is already looking forward to the next time they can see each other. “Upon leaving the family, Shiloh asked many questions,” Angelina continued. “It is of course hard to explain all of the harsh realities of war and displacement. She said she felt sad, but was happy that she went and is looking forward to the next visit.”

The next stop on Angelina and Shiloh’s trip is Turkey.

They are expected to arrive at Midyat Camp on Saturday to mark World Refugee Day with UNHCR High Commissioner António Guterres.

They are also expected to meet with Syrian and Iraqi refugees before joining Brad Pitt and the rest of the family for Father’s Day celebrations on Sunday.

In honor of the pair’s moving trip, look back at some of Angelina’s most inspiring moments, then reminisce about her and Brad’s relationship time line.

Angelina Jolie has taken her eldest daughter Shiloh on a visit to a camp for Syrian refugees in southeastern Turkey.

The Hollywood star, who serves as a Special Envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for refugees, spoke of an ‘explosion of human suffering and displacement’ following her visit on Saturday, to mark World Refugee Day.

Jolie was accompanied on the visit by her eldest biological child, nine-year-old Shiloh Jolie-Pitt, who has become well-known for her androgynous style choices.

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Hollywood star and UN High Commissioner for Refugees visit a camp for Syrian refugees in southeastern Turkey with nine-year-old daughter Shiloh Jolie-Pitt

Hollywood star and UN High Commissioner for Refugees visit a camp for Syrian refugees in southeastern Turkey with nine-year-old daughter Shiloh Jolie-Pitt

The 40-year-old actress spoke of an 'explosion of human suffering and displacement' as she attempted to persuade the world to do more to help the people flooding into Europe

The 40-year-old actress spoke of an ‘explosion of human suffering and displacement’ as she attempted to persuade the world to do more to help the people flooding into Europe

The 40-year-old actress said the world is living through an era of mass displacement, at a news conference in southeastern Turkey.

‘Never before have so many people been dispossessed or stripped of their human rights,’ Jolie said.

The U.N. refugee agency UNHCR said in a report last week that there were now more refugees than at any other time in history, with 59.5million people displaced from their homes worldwide. 

She said that the world has never before seen such mass displacement, at a news conference in southeastern Turkey, to mark World Refugee Day

She said that the world has never before seen such mass displacement, at a news conference in southeastern Turkey, to mark World Refugee Day

Jolie brought along her daughter Shiloh, second left, to walk through the city of Mardin on a trip to visit a refugee camp for displaced Iraqis and Syrians

Jolie brought along her daughter Shiloh, second left, to walk through the city of Mardin on a trip to visit a refugee camp for displaced Iraqis and Syrians

‘There is an explosion of human suffering and displacement on a level that has never been seen before,’ Jolie said, warning that Syrians and Iraqis were running out of safe havens as neighbouring states reached the limit of their capacity.

‘It is hard to point to a single instance where, as an international community, we are decisively addressing the root causes of refugee flows,’ she said.

Jolie’s visit is the latest in a series of visits to Turkey as part of her work as the UNHCR’s special envoy to bring attention to the plight of refugees.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3133535/Angelina-Jolie-visits-Syrian-refugees-daughter-Shiloh-Jolie-Pitt-role-High-Commissioner.html#ixzz3e0dZnhKU
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As numbers increase, many countries are scrambling to find ways to close their doors to the new arrivals.

Hungary recently announced plans to build a 13ft-high fence on the border with Serbia to stop the flow of migrants from Asia and Africa, and anti-immigrant sentiment has flared elsewhere in Europe.

Jolie spoke of the problem in general terms.

‘People are running out of places to run to,’ she said, emphasizing ‘the need to be open and tolerant to people… who may not be able to return home.’

Turkey now officially hosts the world’s largest refugee community – about 1.6million, according the latest U.N. figures.

Angelina Jolie's visit comes as the war in neighbouring Syria rages into its fifth year 

Angelina Jolie’s visit comes as the war in neighbouring Syria rages into its fifth year

As Special Envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Angelina Jolie's role is to bring attention to the plight of refugees

As Special Envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Angelina Jolie’s role is to bring attention to the plight of refugees

As the war in neighbouring Syria rages into its fifth year, the flow shows no sign of abating.

‘We don’t know how many more will be coming,’ said Fuat Oktay, the chief of Turkey’s disaster and emergency agency. ‘There’s a huge risk that the number might increase.’

Jolie and U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres met Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan in the city of Midyat, some 30 miles from the Syrian border. She also attended a Ramadan fast-breaking dinner at a nearby camp and visited refugees.

This was Jolie’s third visit to Turkey since 2011, when the conflict in Syria began. The war has displaced more than 3 million refugees, or almost a fifth of the pre-war population.

Angelina Jolie (right) and UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres (left) attended a press conference in Mardin, Turkey, on Saturday in which they discussed the current state of refugees

Angelina Jolie (right) and UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres (left) attended a press conference in Mardin, Turkey, on Saturday in which they discussed the current state of refugees

On Saturday Jolie visited a refugee camp in southeastern Turkey that hosts victims of the crisis in Syria

On Saturday Jolie visited a refugee camp in southeastern Turkey that hosts victims of the crisis in Syria

Jolie visits Midyat refugee camp in Mardin, southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border on Saturda

Jolie visits Midyat refugee camp in Mardin, southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border on Saturda

Jolie visited the camp which is sheltering those who have fled the 4-year conflict in neighboring Syria. The UN refugee agency has said the number of Syrian refugees seeking its help now tops two-million - and could be far higher

Jolie visited the camp which is sheltering those who have fled the 4-year conflict in neighboring Syria.

The UN refugee agency has said the number of Syrian refugees seeking its help now tops two-million – and could be far higher

Turkey is the world's biggest refugee host with 1.59 million refugees, according to the most recent U.N. figures

Turkey is the world’s biggest refugee host with 1.59 million refugees, according to the most recent U.N. figures

Jolie, left, meets Ahmet Turk, the mayor of the city of Mardin, southeastern Turkey to discuss refugee camps

Jolie, left, meets Ahmet Turk, the mayor of the city of Mardin, southeastern Turkey to discuss refugee camps

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, talks with U.S. actress Angelina Jolie, left, Special Envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, as U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, centre, listens, during a visit to the Midyat refugee camp in Mardin, southeastern Turkey

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, talks with U.S. actress Angelina Jolie, left, Special Envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, as U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, centre, listens, during a visit to the Midyat refugee camp in Mardin, southeastern Turkey

Refugees forced from their homes by Isis fighters use the visit to share their plight with the world

Refugees forced from their homes by Isis fighters use the visit to share their plight with the world

Men, women and children are now forced to call the camp their home thanks to the five-year-long war in neighbouring Syria

Men, women and children are now forced to call the camp their home thanks to the five-year-long war in neighbouring Syria

Yazidi refugee children stand behind fences as they wait for the arrival of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and Special Envoy Angelina Jolie at a Syrian and Iraqi refugee camp in the southern Turkish town of Midyat

Yazidi refugee children stand behind fences as they wait for the arrival of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and Special Envoy Angelina Jolie at a Syrian and Iraqi refugee camp in the southern Turkish town of Midyat

The people living in the camp are desperate to be welcomed into Europe where they can begin to rebuild their lives

The people living in the camp are desperate to be welcomed into Europe where they can begin to rebuild their lives

Yazidi refugee women stand behind fences as they wait for Jolie to arrive at the camp on World Refugee Day

Yazidi refugee women stand behind fences as they wait for Jolie to arrive at the camp on World Refugee Day

As the war in neighboring Syria rages into its fifth year, the flow of refugees into Turkey shows no sign of abating

As the war in neighboring Syria rages into its fifth year, the flow of refugees into Turkey shows no sign of abating

Jolie receives flowers as she is welcomed by a girl on arrival at the mayor's office in the city of Mardin, Turkey

Jolie receives flowers as she is welcomed by a girl on arrival at the mayor’s office in the city of Mardin, Turkey

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3133535/Angelina-Jolie-visits-Syrian-refugees-daughter-Shiloh-Jolie-Pitt-role-High-Commissioner.html#ixzz3e0dwwYp3
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 Anthony Bourdain on CNN returns to Beirut

“Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” travels to Beirut, Sunday at 9 p.m. ET/PT on CNN. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

 I briefly considered naming my daughter “Beirut.”

She was, after all, conceived within two hours of returning from my first visit there.

In 2006, along with my crew, and a number of other foreign nationals, I had been taken off the beach by the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit and transported by LCU to the USS Nashville, and from there to Cyprus and home. (During Israel preemptive war on Lebanon)

The experience left me with a deep love and appreciation for the U.S. Navy and Marines, the now-decommissioned Nashville (once referred to affectionately as the “Trashville”), and, of course, Beirut.

That experience changed everything for me. One day I was making television about eating and drinking. The next, I was watching the airport I’d just landed in a few days earlier being blown up across the water from my hotel window.

I came away from the experience deeply embittered, confused — and determined to make television differently than I’d done before.

I didn’t know how I was going to do it — or whether my then-network was going to allow me — but the days of “happy horseshit”, the uplifting sum-up at the end of every show, the reflex inclusion of a food scene in every act, that ended right there.

The world was bigger than that.

The stories more confusing, more complex, less satisfying in their resolutions. As I noted in my utterly depressing last lines of voiceover in the eventual show we put together

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One minute in Beirut 01:03
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I didn’t feel an urge to turn into Dan Rather.

Our Beirut experience did not give me delusions of being a journalist. I just saw that there were realities beyond what was on my plate, and those realities almost inevitably informed what was — or was not — for dinner. To ignore them now seemed monstrous.

And yet, I’d already fallen in love with Beirut. We all had. Everyone on my crew.

As soon as we’d landed, headed into town, there was a reaction I can only describe as “pheromonic”: the place just smelled good. Like a place we were going to love.

You learn to trust these kinds of feelings after years on the road.

We soon met lovely people from every kind of background. We found fantastic food everywhere. A city with a proud, almost frenetic party and nightclub culture.

A place where bikinis and hijabs appeared to coexist seamlessly — where all the evils, all the problems of the world could be easily found, right next to and among all the best things about being human and being alive.

This was a city where nothing made any damn sense at all — in the best possible way.

A country with no president for over a year — ruled by a power sharing coalition of oligarchs and Hezbollah, neighbor problems as serious as anyone could have, history so awful and tragic that one would assume the various factions would be at each others throats for the next century.

Yet you can go to a seaside fish restaurant and see people happily eating with their families and smoking shisha, who in any other place would be shooting at each other.

The thrill of life in Lebanon

<img alt=”The thrill of life in Lebanon” class=”media__image” src=”http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/150617223025-free-sexuality-bourdain-beirut-00001221-large-169.jpg”>

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The thrill of life in Lebanon 01:27
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It’s a beautiful city, with layers of scars the locals have ceased to even notice. It’s a place with tremendous heart.

It’s a place I’ve described as the Rumsfeldian dream of what, best-case scenario, the neocon masterminds who thought up Iraq, imagined for the post-Saddam Middle East: a place Americans could wander safely, order KFC, shop at the Gap. Where dollars are accepted everywhere and nearly everybody speaks English.

That is an egregious oversimplification. But it’s also my way of telling you should go there. It defies logic. It defies expectations. It is amazing.

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It defies logic. It defies expectations. It is amazing.
EVERYONE should visit.

Anthony Bourdain returns to Beirut, a city ‘where nothing made any damn sense at all — in the best possible way.’
edition.cnn.com|By Anthony Bourdain, CNN

Do-able

Lean entrepreneurs can talk about the minimum viable product, but far more important is the maximum do-able project.

Given the resources you have (your assets, your time, your patience), what’s the biggest thing it’s quite likely you can pull off?

Our culture is organized around the people who get on base, who reliably keep their promises, who deliver.

“Quite likely,” is a comforting story indeed. [HT to Bernadette.]

Domino’s could have offered 5-minute pizza delivery, and sometimes, without a doubt, they could have pulled that off.

But promising something they could do virtually every time earned them a spot on the speed dial of millions of phones.

Aiming too high is just as fearful a tactic as aiming too low.

Before you promise to change the world, it makes sense to do the hard work of changing your neighborhood.

Do what you say, then do it again, even better.

We need your dreams, but we also need your deeds.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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