Adonis Diaries

Archive for July 2015

 

Preparing for a shark attack

A shark attack is sudden, visceral and overwhelming.

And it’s impossible to be a tough guy in the face of one.

The sheer terror of it overwhelms us, paralyzing us, helpless to do a thing about it.

And, most important, and easily overlooked:

Shark attacks are astonishingly rare.

It turns out that there’s no useful correlation between the enormity of a hazard and its relevance to our lives.

The same thing is true of your project, your upcoming speech, and the meeting you’re about to schedule.

Using the phrase, “shark attack” to describe the imaginary but horrible pitfall ahead is a good way to remind ourselves to focus on something else.

Better to prepare for a hazard both likely and avoidable instead.

‘Black Friday’: Carnage in Rafah (2014 Israel pre-emptive war on Gaza)

On 8 July 2014, Israel launched a military operation code-named Operation Protective Edge, the third major offensive in Gaza since 2008.

It announced that the operation was aimed at stopping rocket attacks from Gaza on Israeli civilians.

A ground operation followed, launched on the night of 17-18 July. According to the Israeli army, one of the primary objectives of the ground operation was to destroy the tunnel system constructed by Palestinian armed groups, particularly those with shafts discovered near residential areas located in Israel near the border with the Gaza Strip.

On 1 August 2014 Israel and Hamas agreed to a 72-hour humanitarian ceasefire that would take effect at 8am that day.

Three weeks after Israel launched its military offensive on Gaza, thousands of Palestinians who had sought refuge in shelters or with relatives prepared to return to their homes during the anticipated break in hostilities.

In Rafah, the southernmost city in the Gaza Strip, a group of Israeli soldiers patrolling an agricultural area west of the border encountered a group of Hamas fighters posted there. A fire fight ensued, resulting in the death of two Israeli soldiers and one Palestinian fighter.

The Hamas fighters captured an Israeli officer, Lieutenant Hadar Goldin, and took him into a tunnel. What followed became one of the deadliest episodes of the war; an intensive use of firepower by Israel, which lasted four days and killed scores of civilians (reports range from at least 135 to over 200), injured many more and destroyed or damaged hundreds of homes and other civilian structures, mostly on 1 August.

In this report, Amnesty International and Forensic Architecture, a research team based at Goldsmiths, University of London, provide a detailed reconstruction of the events in Rafah from 1 August until 4 August 2014, when a ceasefire came into effect. The report examines the Israeli army’s response to the capture of Lieutenant Hadar Goldin and its implementation of the Hannibal Directive – a controversial command designed to deal with captures of soldiers by unleashing massive firepower on persons, vehicles and buildings in the vicinity of the attack, despite the risk to civilians and the captured soldier(s).

The report recounts events by connecting various forms of information including: testimonies from victims and witnesses including medics, journalists, and human rights defenders in Rafah; reports by human rights and other organizations; news and media feeds, public statements and other information from Israeli and Palestinian official sources; and videos and photographs collected on the ground and from the media.

Amnesty International and Forensic Architecture worked with a number of field researchers and photographers who documented sites where incidents took place using protocols for forensic photography. Forensic Architecture located elements of witness testimonies in space and time and plotted the movement of witnesses through a three-dimensional model of urban spaces.

It also modelled and animated the testimony of several witnesses, combining spatial information obtained from separate testimonies and other sources in order to reconstruct incidents. Three satellite images of the area, dated 30 July, 1 August and 14 August, were obtained and analysed in detail; the image of 1 August reveals a rare overview of a moment within the conflict. 7

Forensic Architecture also retrieved a large amount of audiovisual material on social media and employed digital maps and models to locate evidence such as oral description, photography, video and satellite imagery in space and time. When audio-visual material from social media came with inadequate metadata, Forensic Architecture used time indicators in the image, such as shadow and smoke plumes analysis, to locate sources in space and time.

An Israeli infantry officer described to Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence the events that ensued after the Hannibal Directive was announced on the radio:

“The minute ‘Hannibal Directive’ is declared on the radio, there are consequences. There’s a fire procedure called the ‘Hannibal fire procedure’ – you fire at every suspicious place that merges with a central route. You don’t spare any means.”
Israeli army Infantry Officer

He reported that the initial burst of fire lasted three hours. An artillery soldier said his battery was “firing at a maximum fire rate” right into inhabited areas. According to the report of an Israeli military inquiry, more than 2,000 bombs, missiles and shells were fired in Rafah during 1 August, including 1,000 in the three hours following the capture.

According to the Israeli army, the initial strikes aimed to stop the movement of all “suspicious” persons and vehicles, to isolate the area until the arrival of ground forces and to target known and suspected tunnel shafts, which meant bombing residential buildings and agricultural installations suspected of harbouring tunnel exits or entrances.

Another officer explained the logic of the operation, including potentially killing the captured soldier: “In such an event you prefer a killed soldier rather than a soldier in enemy hands, like [Gilad] Shalit. I told myself ‘even if I bring back a corpse I have brought back the missing person’.”

As the strikes began, the roads in eastern Rafah were full of disoriented civilians moving in all directions. Believing a ceasefire had begun, they had returned – or were returning – to their homes. Many decided to turn around, attempting to flee under a barrage of bombs and gunfire.

Palestinian witnesses described jets, drones, helicopters and artillery raining fire at pedestrians and vehicles at the intersections, indiscriminately hitting cars, ambulances, motorbikes and pedestrians. “You see the hysteria of the children, destruction, and mushroom clouds, and you try to get as far away from them as you can,” said Wa’el al-Namla, a local resident and father of two.

Inam Ouda Ayed bin Hammad, a local resident, told Amnesty International that, after 9am on 1 August, she noticed the shelling intensifying and missiles landing in close vicinity to their home in the al-Tannur neighbourhood of Rafah. She and her family were on the streets seeking shelter elsewhere when a bomb hit a building nearby and killed her son Anas, her cousin Wafa and at least 14 other civilians, as well as injuring scores of other fleeing civilians.

One of the scenarios that the Israeli military considered was that the captured soldier, Lieutenant Goldin, had been wounded and taken to the Abu Youssef al-Najjar hospital, the medical facility closest to the area of capture. The flood of casualties started coming into the hospital at about 10am, according to medical staff. The attacks around the hospital grew nearer and more frequent as the day went on. Studying photographs of the hospital, Forensic Architecture noted both internal and external damage.

On the satellite image taken on 14 August, Forensic Architecture detected one crater about 120m south-west of the hospital and three craters about the same distance north-east of the hospital.

Patients, staff and persons seeking refuge at the hospital proceeded to evacuate the building in a rush when the attacks intensified. An organized evacuation took place in the evening. By about 7pm the hospital was closed and reporters claimed that the entire neighbourhood around the Abu Youssef al-Najjar hospital was under artillery fire.

The pounding of Rafah continued for three days after the initial strikes of 1 August, even after Lieutenant Goldin was declared dead by an Israeli rabbinical court and buried on 2 August.

There is overwhelming evidence that Israeli forces committed disproportionate, or otherwise indiscriminate, attacks which killed scores of civilians in their homes, on the streets and in vehicles and injured many more. This includes repeatedly firing artillery and other imprecise explosive weapons in densely populated civilian areas during the attacks on Rafah between 1 and 4 August. In some cases, there are indications that they directly fired at and killed civilians, including people fleeing.

Public statements by Israeli army commanders and soldiers after the conflict provide compelling reasons to conclude that some attacks that killed civilians and destroyed homes and property were intentionally carried out and motivated by a desire for revenge – to teach a lesson to, or punish, the population of Rafah for the capture of Lieutenant Goldin.

There is consequently strong evidence that many such attacks in Rafah between 1 and 4 August were serious violations of international humanitarian law and constituted grave breaches of the Fourth Geneva Convention or other war crimes.

The UN Independent Commission of Inquiry on the 2014 Gaza Conflict examined the Israeli army attack on Rafah on 1 August and also raised serious concerns about the conformity of the Israeli army actions on that day with international law. The Commission investigated attacks it considered disproportionate or otherwise indiscriminate and found that some might amount to war crimes.

The Commission also concluded that the Israeli army did not appear to have taken precautions to verify that targets of attacks were lawful military objectives and to choose the weapons which could avoid or minimize civilian casualties and destruction to civilian structures.

Israeli army commanders and officers can operate in confidence that they are unlikely to be held accountable for violations of international law due to the pervasive climate of impunity that has existed for decades. This is due, in large part, to the lack of independent, impartial and effective investigations.

Despite the massive toll that Operation Protective Edge had on civilians in Gaza, almost one year after the conflict, military prosecutors have indicted only three soldiers for one incident of looting. A significant number of cases have been closed on the basis that no crimes were committed (the main reason given in such decisions) or that there was insufficient evidence to indict.

With regard to Israeli army operations in Rafah between 1 and 4 August, the Israeli authorities have failed to conduct genuine, effective, and prompt investigations into any of the allegations of serious violations of international humanitarian law documented in this report, let alone to prosecute individuals, including commanders and civilian superiors, suspected of committing or ordering related crimes under international law.

The authorities have failed to ensure that victims have effective access to justice, or to provide them with full and prompt reparation, including restitution, compensation, rehabilitation, satisfaction and guarantees of non-repetition.

The events need to be independently and impartially investigated. Amnesty International’s view is that no official body capable of conducting such investigations currently exists in Israel. It is therefore calling on the Israeli authorities to: co-operate fully with the ongoing preliminary examination by the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court into the situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories and any future investigations or prosecutions; reform their domestic mechanisms for investigating allegations of violations of international humanitarian law to ensure that it is independent, effective, prompt and transparent; allow human rights organizations access to Gaza to investigate suspected violations of international law by all parties to the conflict; and immediately and fully lift the blockade imposed on Gaza since 2007.

Amnesty International is also asking the international community in general to support the role of the International Criminal Court in examining allegations of crimes under international law including those documented in this report, and to pressure the Israeli and Palestinian authorities to co-operate fully with the Office of the Prosecutor.

All states should oppose punitive measures against Palestine for joining the International Criminal Court or for submitting information on Israeli violations to the Court or taking other steps to activate international justice mechanisms.

On the same day three ambulances from the hospital went to collect wounded people near a mosque in Rafah; one ambulance was hit and completely destroyed by what appeared to be three drone-launched missiles. The three medics and all the wounded within the ambulance were burnt to death.

A second ambulance left, while the other, which remained to collect the wounded and dead, was hit by another apparent drone strike.

Andrew Bossone shared this link

“There is overwhelming evidence that Israeli forces committed disproportionate, or otherwise indiscriminate, attacks which killed scores of civilians in their homes, on the streets and in vehicles and injured many more.

This includes repeatedly firing artillery and other imprecise explosive weapons in densely populated civilian areas during the attacks on Rafah between 1 and 4 August.

In some cases, there are indications that they directly fired at and killed civilians, including people fleeing.

‘Black Friday’: Carnage in Rafah (2014 Israel pre-emptive war on Gaza)
A joint report by Amnesty International and Forensic Architecture reveals strong evidence of Israeli war crimes during attacks on Rafah between 1 and 4 August…
blackfriday.amnesty.org|By Amnesty International and Forensic Architecture

Christine Lagarde (IMF chief) pays No taxes?

And why she insist on attacking Greeks?

Philip Aldrick, Economics Editor, posted in May 2012:

Ms Lagarde was forced to publish an embarrassing climbdown on her Facebook page over the weekend after being bombarded by hundreds of Greek people who felt insulted by her suggestion that the country’s crisis was partly due to “all these people in Greece who are trying to escape tax”.

On Tuesday she had to admit that her $467,940 (£300,000) annual salary and $83,760 of additional allowances are entirely tax-free as the IMF is an international organisation.

An IMF spokesman said: “Salaries, like those in most international organizations, are paid on a lower, net of tax basis to ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of nationality.”

He added that Ms Lagarde, 56, does pay all other “taxes levied on her, including local and property taxes in the US and France”.

Ms Lagarde earns more than President Barack Obama and David Cameron, both of whom pay taxes.

Andrew Bossone shared this link

Hypocrite. IMF chief Christine Lagarde attack on Greeks, blaming them as tax avoiders, backfires as she pays no tax

Christine Lagarde, the International Monetary Fund managing director who provoked an angry reaction from the Greek people after telling them to pay their…

Rate of killing Native Americans identical to black Americans

By Zak Cheney-Rice, February 05, 2015

The end of 2014 was a bloody time for Native Americans.

Even as protesters rallied against the police killings of unarmed black people like Michael Brown and Eric Garner in December, Rapid City police fired five bullets into Allen Locke, a 30-year-old Lakota man living in South Dakota.

In a tragic bit of irony, it was later revealed that Locke had been at a demonstration against police killings of indigenous people just one day earlier.

Yet while devastating for his family and community, Locke’s death illustrates a much bigger problem:

From 1999 to 2013, Native Americans were killed by law enforcement at nearly identical rates as black Americans, tying them for the most at-risk populations in this respect.

The difference is that almost no one is talking about them.

There are 5.1 million American Indians and Alaska Natives in the U.S. as of 2011, significantly fewer than the country’s 45 million black Americans (as of 2013).

But like black Americans, indigenous people are killed by law enforcement officers at rates that far outstrip their share of the population.

While #BlackLivesMatter evolved into a national rallying cry for racial justice over the summer, a largely overlooked #NativeLivesMatter movement has been quietly galvanizing activists as well.

Few mainstream outlets report on it, but the indigenous blogosphere and Twitterverse abound with horror stories, not the least of which is that six Native men and women were killed by police in November and December alone.

“We protest, we take to social media, we get as many stories and Native American voices as we can into news media,” Simon Moya-Smith, a journalist and editor with Indian Country Today Media Network, told Mic in an email. “[But still] we’re not entirely on [the mainstream media’s] radar – maybe for Indian mascots, but for police brutality? Barely, if at all.”

In some of these cases, including Allen Locke’s, the victims were allegedly armed when killed. But this designation doesn’t always tell the whole story.

In cases like that of John T. Williams in 2010, for example, the knife that the victim held that prompted Seattle police to take his life was a carving instrument, folded shut at the time of his shooting.

Williams’ death set off a string of protests in early 2011.

Although the officer who shot the 50-year-old resigned eventually, he was never charged with a criminal offense. It’s a sad but familiar story for anyone who watched grand juries fail to indict Officers Darren Wilson and Daniel Pantaleo for killing Brown and Garner, respectively.

Some of the factors that affect these altercations result from a long history of American legal meddling into Natives’ affairs, including disproportionate rates of poverty, substance abuse, suicide and lowered access to education, employment and health care prospects.

And officials’ inability to properly address these disparities has resulted in the continued criminalization of indigenous people, exacerbated by the combined forces of systemic substance abuse, mental health issues and unemployment.

Take the following incidents as examples: Mah-hi-vist Goodblanket, 18, was shot 7 times in Custer County, Oklahoma, in 2013.

And 34-year-old Benjamin Whiteshield was shot through the mouth and killed in Clinton, Oklahoma, in 2012.

Both were experiencing episodes of mental illness when police killed them.

Meanwhile, Christina Tahhahwah was arrested during a bipolar episode on Nov. 13 and died after she went into cardiac arrest in a Lawton, Oklahoma, police holding cell.

The details surrounding Tahhahwah’s death are dubious, to say the least. Native News Online reports she’d been handcuffed to her cell door “for unknown reasons,” and that the 37-year-old’s parents weren’t notified of her transfer to the hospital — where she was pronounced dead — until many hours after the fact.

Meanwhile, her fellow inmates claim she’d been “tased repeatedly” for refusing to stop singing Comanche hymns (Lawton Police have since denied the allegations).

Andrew Bossone shared this link

“From 1999 to 2013, Native Americans were killed by law enforcement at nearly identical rates as black Americans

Are you a Picky Eater in Lebanon?

The thing about being a picky eater, especially in Lebanon, is that everyone around you manages to take personal offense to the fact that you simply don’t like to eat everything put in front of you.

All of a sudden, you have skirmishes with parents, siblings, friends and even extended family, all because you aren’t content with the idea of eating food like you’re an animal forced to eat from a giant trough of glob along with the rest of the cattle.

And for me, it’s not just about being a picky eater, it’s also about not wanting to mix food together. The way I see it, mixing food together prevents you from enjoying the actual taste of what you’re eating. (Like mixing everything from a buffet?)

I’m going to go with the example of tabbouli instead of regular garden salad simply because almost every Lebanese person loves it, except me.



The scenario usually goes a little something like this: after spending about five to ten minutes trying to internally convinced myself that I can eat the tabbouli placed in front of me, I decided to just ignore it and keep quiet.

Maybe no one will notice I’m not eating the physical embodiment of Lebanese national pride.


Of course, this strategy never works. You’re simply not Lebanese if you’re not shoving yourself into other people’s business… and flavor palates.


So, in a pitiful attempt to shut up the haters, you start to pick at the goddamn tabbouli.

Can someone please explain to me why it must consist of massive chunks of banadoura? I mean, really?

No human should ever be forced to eat this much banadoura in one sitting.

Note: I don’t add salt or citrus or anything extra in my dishes so that I may taste the original flavour. Sauces are for those lacking taste buds.

Patsy Z shared  Beirut.com link.

You’re simply not Lebanese if you’re not shoving yourself into other people’s business… and flavor palates.

The thing about being a picky eater, especially in Lebanon, is that everyone around you manages to take personal offense to the fact that you simply don’t like to eat everything put in front of you.
beirut.com

Get counsel from the beach?

Kiif w aymta w leih

La Plage Porte Conseil

Regardant l’immensité océanique, qui essayait de rivaliser avec celle du ciel dans un re-make de la grenouille.

La grenouille voulait se faire aussi grosse que le boeuf , tout en induisant ma peau de cette huile protectrice contre cet astre qui me brûlait l’épiderme dans le cadre de “ quand on me cherche , on me trouve ” , et n’étant pas à une brûlure près, une question me brûlait la langue :
Il y a surement un créateur à tout cela ..
Créateur … Oui .
Kiif w aymta w leih ?
Créateur … Peut être bien que non …
Créateur ? Possédant tout cet univers …

Jusqu’à la dernière goutte de ma crème solaire ?

Mais alors il devrait être d’une générosité et d’une bonté infinies .

Voilà ce qui devrait d’être infini chez ” lui ” . Générosité et bonté .
Pourquoi cependant , tant de souffrances sur notre “minuscule astre” ?
Dieu que c’est compliqué tout cela …
– Tu veux une glace Jamil ? Me dit ma chère et tendre .
– Tu crois que Dieu existe vraiment ?
– Avec tes neurones toujours en ébullition, tu fais fondre nos glaces !
Je me suis dit que l’humanité à ses débuts, ayant des problèmes très existentiels à résoudre directement : se nourrir, se chauffer, se protéger, adorait ce qu’elle craignait .
Une fois assise, sa pensée se structura , et d’ennui elle commença a penser !
En avait- elle vraiment besoin ?
L’immensité de l’univers, et sa prise de conscience de cette immensité provoquèrent en elle une insécurité sidérale.
Des questions fusèrent avec autant de réponses ” décentralisées” chacun allant de ses propres réponses.

Ce furent les illustres philosophe Grecs qu’aujourd’hui , insolvables , on tente de les chasser de l’Europe !!!!!
Naissance du mot destin et de sa soeur destinée.
La multitude des questions, devenait ingérable.

Fallait les centraliser .
Naissance des religions
Judaïsme. Christianisme. Islam.
Des banques de la pensée humaine .
T’es à quelle banque ?
La centralisation fut contradictoire, les philosophes reprirent de plus belle.
On pouvait quand on est trop intelligent avoir un compte à la banque de la religion et un autre chez les philosophes , tel mon Chrétien préféré.
ST.Augustin, qui écrivit dans une de ses lettres à un ami :

Je suis dans l’embarras , car que les adultes souffrent, on peut dire que Dieu les fait souffrir , à cause du pêcher originel , mais que les enfants; les enfants souffrent …pourquoi ? C’est à croire que ce pêcher originel Dieu n’a voulu en épargner personne ” disait -il pour pouvoir continuer à croire.
Je suis personnellement dans un embarras encore plus aigu, devant les atrocités de notre siècle qui comme lui ne font que commencer.
Je me dis que la prise de conscience de la complexité de l’univers et de ce qui nous attend ou ne nous attend guère, a déstabilisé l’humanité à tel point qu’elle s’est coupée en deux.

Son incertitude sidérale, l’a scindée en deux . Elle est devenue Schizophrène .

Tout ce qui n’est pas Elle, est Dieu et tout ce qui n’est pas Dieu , est Elle .
Dieu existe dans ce que nous faisons, disons, ou …pire, dans ce que nous justifions .
D’un siècle à un autre, ce Dieu change d’habit : de nos jours , c’est l’Argent.

A-t-on jamais reconnu que nos injustices commises , l’étaient au nom de Dieu ?

Nous ne les reconnaitrons jamais non plus au nom de l’Argent , ce nouveau dieu qui sait parfaitement se justifier . Il a tous les médias pour lui .
Le Dieu schizophrène , c’est nous vous dis-je …
( Jamil BERRY )

Three questions in the  Berlin-Artparasites

Sara Sibai shared berlin-artparasites‘s photo, July 24, 2015.
berlin-artparasites's photo.

My mother tells me
that when I meet someone I like,
I have to ask them three questions:

1. what are you afraid of?
2. do you like dogs?
3. what do you do when it rains?

Of those three, she says the first one is the most important.
“They gotta be scared of something, baby. Everybody is. If they aren’t afraid of anything, then they don’t believe in anything, either.”

I met you on a Sunday,

right after church.
one look and my heart fell

into my stomach like a trap door.

On our second date,
I asked you what you were afraid of.
“spiders, mostly. being alone. little children, like, the ones who just learned how to push a kid over on the playground. oh and space. holy shit, space.”
I asked you if you liked dogs.
I have three.”
I asked you what you do when it rains.
“sleep, mostly. sometimes I sit at the window and watch the rain droplets race. I make a shelter out of plastic in my backyard for all the stray animals; leave them food and a place to sleep.”

He smiled like he knew.
like his mom told him the same
thing.
“how about you?”

me?
I’m scared of everything.
of the hole in the o-zone layer,
of the lady next door who never
smiles at her dog,
and especially of all the secrets
the government must be breaking
it’s back trying to keep from us.
I love dogs so much, you have no idea.
I sleep when it rains.
I want to tell everyone I love them.
I want to find every stray animal and bring them home.
I want to wake up in your hair
and make you shitty coffee
and kiss your neck
and draw silly stick figures of us.
I never want to ask anyone else
these questions
ever again. ―Caitlyn Siehl

‪#‎TodaysConvo‬

artwork by Marion Fayolle

Did our sudden Neo-Cortex outgrowth stumped our survival process as a species?

A few of the human species developed this Neo-Cortex outgrowth that was as big as the current species, and they have gone extinct.

The Cro-Magnon barely made use of this outgrowth and they never changed their dwelling habit and tools.

The Neanderthal species left very detailed painting in deep caves and vanished about 30,000 years after spreading in much of current Europe.

The current human species managed through sustained “nurturing procedure” to eventually integrate this process into their genes.

This qualitative jump allowed this species to tap into the potentialities of this new outgrowth, a gift that was Not that needed for its survival but played a big role in sedentary tradition, creating verbal languages and written languages…

The consequences were the forming of highly structured societies in hierarchical trends which affected our brains and sensory organs to structurally filter the multitude of stimuli (or background noises) that bombard our system.

Supposedly, these filtering barriers were meant to allow us to survive our daily tasks within our structured environment.

This Neo-Cortex might be a handicap for our survival since the materialistic “rational” interpretations of phenomena and events are disrupting the vast potentials of our cognitive system.

Since Aristotle, many intellectuals claimed that “Within a few years, all the mysteries and superstitions will be explained and resolved for our rational comprehension.”

And yet, we are no nearer of understanding the multitudes of mysteries surrounding us.

Probably, our deficiencies revolve around:

1. The Neo-Cortex was not “programmed” to resolve abstract concepts related to our death and spiritual quests

2. The tenuous assumption that the power and potentials of our brains have No limits.

Mankind survived for thousand of years and relied on telepathy, premonition, psychokinese, pre-cognition… and people believed on the power of a few leaders (shaman, medicine man, priest of the tribe…) to see the future of events, catastrophes and the like.

People believed in extra-sensory abilities to predict and see what our limited sensory organs can perform.

People accepted that many connections and coincidences were Not related to physical causative factors.

The first half of this century produced scores of Nobel laureates who challenged many classical physical laws and set the stage of a wider openness of the mind to interpret mysteries not resolved by pure cognitive methods. (See notes)

After taking hallucigen matters (natural or lab fabricated), of all kinds, the brains and sensory organs will start recognizing certain stimuli as acceptable inputs or sounds to be retrieved and stored as reality. With frequent intakes, the filter structure in the brains will relax their hold and let more stimuli to pass into the cognitive realm.

The same procedure is valid for these new “Augmented” technology for the sensory organs to enhance our limited perception power.

The difference is that the Augmented technology should be more efficient than those over-doze intake of chemicals that are already in our system, because they create new side networks of neurons and synapsis that circumvent and bypass the hierarchical structure in our nervous system.

The problem with chemical intakes are addictive and prohibit the individual from experimenting with a life without those chemicals, even though with focus and determination they could experience the same extra sensations after they quit.

Mankind is going through a period of totally relying on the autonomous sub branches in our internal hierarchical structure. Most of the experts in sub-field are totally ignorant or uninterested in other disciples.

Barely a few of the intellectuals check with the higher levels in the structure to seek an integrative and holistic view of the problems the word is going through.

Note 1: Essay inspired from Arthur Koestler in “Janus” 1978

Note 2: The first half of the 20th century witnessed a new world view:

1. Heisenberg stated the “Uncertainty Principle“: In the atomic level, it is not possible to accurately measure simultaneously the location and the speed of a particle. Atoms are Not things or have to be viewed as physical objects with local space, speed, dimensions or energy. At the atomic level,  the world of space-time stop to exist

2. The “Mach Principle” states: The properties of inert matters are determined by the Total Mass of the universe. Inertia is Not intrinsic to the physical body.

3. “Bell theorem” states: When 2 particles interacted and went on opposite directions, any interference with one particle will instantaneously affect the other particle, no matter how distant they are from one another.

4. Wolfgang Pauli “Exclusion Principle” states: No two electrons can occupy the same orbit around the nucleus.

5. “Woltereck Principle” states: Nature has the tendency of creating new forms of life (Anamorphous)

6. The biologist Paul Kammerer stated: Series are universal occurring phenomenon. There exist in the universe a tendency to unite same items in categories that has nothing to do with causality. A sort of selective (sympathetic) serial phenomenon is omnipresent and continual in life, nature and the cosmos.

7. John Wheeler stated: Black Holes and White Holes are two hyper-spaces. Each point in a hyper-space represents a complete 3-dimensional world

8. Feynman stated that particles can go back in time for brief instances.

9. Poisson probability distribution is a universal paradox where a large number of incertitude events generate a certainty.

10. Pic de la Mirandole stated:

1) Unity of the beings is so that each in One with itself, consists of itself and adheres to itself (Associative tendency)

2) Unity of each creature to all the other creature and the world (transcendental or integrative tendency)


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