Adonis Diaries

Archive for July 25th, 2015

Posters And Charts That Graphic Designers Will Relate To

Rana Abou Rjeily shared a link of  

Katy Cowan <katy@creativeboom.com>

Note: After so many years of posting this article, the supposed author of this shared link is asking me to remove it, for no reasons whatsoever. If you have liked this link, tell me if it is appropriate to remote it. It is also your right to give me your feedback
We at DS come across a lot of memes, comics and artworks that offer a hilarious look into the life and mind of a graphic designer.
So we thought, why not collate a digitalsynopsis.com

Who knows, it might even drive some sense into an unreasonable client and make him/her change his/her attitude?

1.

How would you like your graphic design? Pick two - fast, cheap, great or free (venn diagram)

2.

The Designer Vs The Client

3.

Designer Vs Regular People

4.

The Creative Process = Work Begins > Procrastination > Panic > Crying > Deadline

5.

Life of a graphic designer - what everyone thinks I do

6.

Every time you stretch a font, somewhere, a designer cries.

7.

Walked into a very expensive restaurant, sat down, was handed a menu. Comic Sans. Got up and left. Life is hard.

8.

Everything looks official with tiny leaves around it. False, it only works if you use a good serif font.

9.

Things aren't always #000000 and #FFFFFF

10.

How to piss off your designer friends and give them a migraine.

11.

Don't use that tone with me (Pantone)

12.

What kind of a client do you want?

13.

Yo Momma is a shitty designer

14.

Keming - The result of improper kerning

15.

I shot the serif

16.

This is for using comic sans

17.

I'm very font of you because you're just my type.

18.

If you're having font problems I feel bad for you son, I got 99 fonts but Comic Sans ain't one.

19.

When you can select all the feathers of a morning sparrow without missing a single one, only then will you be able to be a true Photoshop master.

20.

There is always someone willing to do it cheaper

21.

I like my coffee how I like my type: Black

22.

My next tattoo will be "Helvetica" written in Arial. When a woman corrects me on it, I will marry her.

23.

Corporate Graphic Design Guide

24.

Graphic designer parking only. Violators will be Photoshopped.

25.

You can't just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.

26.

Please keep the door closed - Please don't use Comic Sans. We're a Fortune 500 company, not a lemonade stand.

27.

What's thrilling about graphic design?

If we had to pick three, it would be tough, but no. 6, 22 and 26 would be our favourites. What about you? Share this post with a fellow designer and voice your views in the comments below.

Superstitions as RISK MANAGEMENT? A PROJECT

John Peter shared Nassim Nicholas Taleb link this July 23, 2015
We can look at supersitions as x% useless and 1-x % with survival benefits.

Except that it is hard to know beforehand what is useless and what is not, what is “irrational” and what has a hidden implicit rationality that helps navigate opaque systems.

But it suffices that a tiny proportions, say only .01%, of superstitions protect collective or individual survival for these superstitions to be necessary.

And for the very notion of superstition to be rational.
Beware of the probability-fool scientist a la Pinker judging superstitions with primitive tools

In fact we can show that some of these superstitions are most sophisticated in complex systems.
Clearly superstitions might have calming effects in helping us make sense of uncertainty (I never fight harmless superstitions), allowing us to be rational elsewhere.

But let us ignore these functions, just focus on survival. Recall that rationality is survival.


To prove the point that superstitions are risk management tools, extremely “rational”, all we need is

1) show that superstitions do not increase risk of ruin ,

2) show only a few seemingly “anecdotal” examples (they are not) of risk-mitigating superstitions that we only understood ex post, such as the belief that ghosts haunt coastal areas ending by protecting people against tsunamis and pushing indigenous populations to settle in elevated areas.

Walking in Nature Changes the Brain: Explain why

A walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health, according to an interesting new study of the physical effects on the brain of visiting nature.

Most of us today live in cities and spend far less time outside in green, natural spaces than people did several generations ago.

City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show.

Various studies have found that urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently been outside.

But just how a visit to a park or other green space might alter mood has been unclear.

Does experiencing nature actually change our brains in some way that affects our emotional health?

That possibility intrigued Gregory Bratman, a graduate student at the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford University, who has been studying the psychological effects of urban living.

In an earlier study published last month, he and his colleagues found that volunteers who walked briefly through a lush, green portion of the Stanford campus were more attentive and happier afterward than volunteers who strolled for the same amount of time near heavy traffic.

But that study did not examine the neurological mechanisms that might underlie the effects of being outside in nature.

So for the new study, which was published last week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Mr. Bratman and his collaborators decided to closely scrutinize what effect a walk might have on a person’s tendency to brood.

Brooding, which is known among cognitive scientists as morbid rumination, is a mental state familiar to most of us, in which we can’t seem to stop chewing over the ways in which things are wrong with ourselves and our lives.

This broken-record fretting is not healthy or helpful. It can be a precursor to depression and is disproportionately common among city dwellers compared with people living outside urban areas, studies show.

Perhaps most interesting for the purposes of Mr. Bratman and his colleagues, such rumination also is strongly associated with increased activity in a portion of the brain known as the sub-genual prefrontal cortex.

If the researchers could track activity in that part of the brain before and after people visited nature, Mr. Bratman realized, they would have a better idea about whether and to what extent nature changes people’s minds.

Mr. Bratman and his colleagues first gathered 38 healthy, adult city dwellers and asked them to complete a questionnaire to determine their normal level of morbid rumination.

The researchers also checked for brain activity in each volunteer’s subgenual prefrontal cortex, using scans that track blood flow through the brain.

Greater blood flow to parts of the brain usually signals more activity in those areas. (Not in a relaxed state)

Then the scientists randomly assigned half of the volunteers to walk for 90 minutes through a leafy, quiet, parklike portion of the Stanford campus or next to a loud, hectic, multi-lane highway in Palo Alto.

The volunteers were not allowed to have companions or listen to music. They were allowed to walk at their own pace.

Immediately after completing their walks, the volunteers returned to the lab and repeated both the questionnaire and the brain scan.

As might have been expected, walking along the highway had not soothed people’s minds. Blood flow to their subgenual prefrontal cortex was still high and their broodiness scores were unchanged.

But the volunteers who had strolled along the quiet, tree-lined paths showed slight but meaningful improvements in their mental health, according to their scores on the questionnaire. They were not dwelling on the negative aspects of their lives as much as they had been before the walk.

They also had less blood flow to the subgenual prefrontal cortex. That portion of their brains were quieter.

These results “strongly suggest that getting out into natural environments” could be an easy and almost immediate way to improve moods for city dwellers, Mr. Bratman

Many questions remain, including how much time in nature is sufficient or ideal for our mental health, as well as what aspects of the natural world are most soothing. (Performance issues)

Is it the greenery, quiet, sunniness, loamy smells, all of those, or something else that lifts our moods?

Do we need to be walking or otherwise physically active outside to gain the fullest psychological benefits? Should we be alone or could companionship amplify mood enhancements?

“There’s a tremendous amount of study that still needs to be done,” Mr. Bratman said.

But in the meantime, he pointed out, there is little downside to strolling through the nearest park, and some chance that you might beneficially muffle, at least for awhile, your subgenual prefrontal cortex.

Andrew Bossone shared this link on Jyly 23, 2015

An explanation for people in Beirut:

Urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently been outside.”

A walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health.
well.blogs.nytimes.com|By Gretchen Reynolds

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