Adonis Diaries

Archive for September 17th, 2015

Insane Pictures Taken At Burning Man Event.

Every year, participants in the Burning Man Festival descend on the playa of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert to form a temporary city—a self-reliant community populated by performers, artists, free spirits, and more.

An estimated 70,000 people came to Burning Man 2015, “Carnival of Mirrors,” from all over the world to dance, express themselves, engage in a social experiment and take in the spectacle.

Gathered below are some of the sights from the festival, photographed by Reuters photographer Jim Urquhart.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

3. From the last Monday in August to the first Monday in September, Burning Man challenges visitors to give up commodities and money, to care for each other like family–and of course–to have a kick-ass time!

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

A gigantic wooden sculpture known as “The Man” is engulfed in flames during the Burning Man 2012 arts and music festival in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

People dance at a midnight rave until the early hours of the morning.

Jim Bourg / Reuters

A woman riding in an outrigger fires a flame cannon over the heads of Burning Man participants as they dance in the early hours of the morning.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

People play a game of “flaming skee-ball” at the 2015 Burning Man.

Jim Bourg / Reuters

A fire tornado emerges from the burning embers of the “Temple of Whollyness” as it burns at the conclusion of the 2013 Burning Man.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters
Jim Bourg / Reuters

The sun rises over the many art installations during the 2011 “Rites of Passage” Burning Man.

Reuters Photographer / SHANNON STAPLETON

Members of the “Naobi Village” perform an early morning ritual in 2003.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters
Reuters Photographer / SHANNON STAPLETON
Jim Bourg / Reuters
Mike Nelson / AFP / Getty Images

A Nevada Sheriff accepts an invitation from a festival participant as another police officer videotapes the encounter. The Sheriffs reportedly do not interfere with the festival, unless an overtly illegal activity is observed.

Hector Mata / AFP / Getty Images

A group of people lie on the ground for a community nude picture.

Mike Nelson / AFP / Getty Images

Festival goers enjoy a nice mud bath in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada.

Hector Mata / AFP / Getty Images
Hector Mata / AFP / Getty Images

David Mcnew / Getty Images

Hector Mata / AFP / Getty Images

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Jordan Lenaburg places a ring on Shandi Trolson’s finger at a wedding ceremony during Burning Man 2015.

Jim Bourg / Reuters
Brad Horn / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Burning Man participants get ready to ride in the “Critical Tits” event in 2007.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

A festival goer rides on the “Eidolon Panspermia Ostentatia Duodenum” art installation during Burning Man 2014.

Brad Horn / ASSOCIATED PRESS

An art installation called “Big Rig Jig” by artist Mike Ross is shown in 2007.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Brad Horn / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman sits in a shelter during a dust storm in 2007.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters
Jim Urquhart / Reuters

A couple embraces during a dust storm at Burning Man 2015.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

The art installation called “Pulse & Bloom” is seen during Burning Man 2014.

Reuters Photographer / SHANNON STAPLETON
Jim Urquhart / Reuters

The art installation called “Embrace” burns during Burning Man 2014.

  • Campers gather at Medusa Madness during Burning Man on September 6, 2015.

Uberized education  

An Uberized education is when –as in antiquity — one goes to a specific teacher to get lectures, bypassing the university.

(Why go to antiquity? A century ago, the aristocratic class were receiving these kinds of Ubers, above the working class privileges))

The students and the teachers are thus matched. If a piece of paper is necessary (certificate), it would be given by *that* teacher, or a group of teachers.

It is not too different from the decentralized apprentice model.

This already works well for executive “education”.

I give short workshops in my specialty of applied probability.

I have given a few with PW, YBY and RD, though only lasting 1-2 days, limited to professionals.

An Uberization would consists in making longer workshops, say of 2-3 week duration, after which the attendees would be getting a piece of paper of sorts.

From my experience, both students and lecturers are more sincere when they bypass institutions.

And, as with other Uberizations, it would be much efficient economically.

A full education would be a collection of such micro-diplomas, which can be done on top of a conventional one.

Finally I would personally like to attend such workshops in disciplines outside my specialty.

After my experience with Aramaic/Syriac (language?)last summer, I have a list of subjects I would be hungry to learn *outside* university systems…

YouStink campaign: Lebanese artist and activist Lucien Bourjeily badly hurt by Internal Forces

After the media were forced out of the Environment ministry where the youth movements were occupying for failing to resolve the enduring garbage crisis.

 Lucien Bourjeily is no stranger to controversy in Lebanon; his involvement in ‪#‎YouStink‬ is just the latest of the renowned director’s social activism.

Actor, director, playwright, Bourjeily rose to fame after publicly campaigning against state censorship of theater and film, with the help of MARCH, an NGO that hopes to foster tolerance and diversity within Lebanese society.

Holding an MFA from Loyola Mormont University in Los Angeles, Bourjeily brought improvised acting to the Lebanese stage, in an attempt, as he calls it, to create “immersive and interactive” theater.

He has previously led workshops on improvised acting, screenwriting, and directing.

StepFeed shared

 

His prominent role in the YouStink campaign may have brought him renewed attention, but the activist-artist has a history of fighting for civil society.
stepfeed.com|By Azza El Masri

As Lucien Bourjeily recovers from alleged targeted police brutality at the American University of Beirut’s Medical Center, the activist and director reassured fans and followers of the YouStink movement on social media that his fight against government corruption was far from over.

شكراً الكن كلكن…بحبكن كلكن وبوسكن… مفروض أطلع اليوم من المستشفى.. :* :)و عندي بس سؤال لوزير الداخلية: ليش شحطوا الإ…

Posted by Lucien Bourjeily on Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Translation: “Thank you everyone. I love you all. I’m scheduled to be released from the hospital today. I only have one question to the Minister of Interior: why did you kick out the press before you came at us? Why did you, as soon as you interrupted the press’ live coverage, use your boots, batons in a barbaric, totalitarian way? You are [part of] the dictatorship of shame. You have no dignity and no gull. Because we were 100% peaceful, you cut off the press so that you wouldn’t let them show the crime you committed. You [works as] the mafia and your corruption has invaded the government… but the people will hold you accountable, and it will do so soon.” 

Bourjeily told StepFeed Wednesday afternoon that he was out of the hospital, but still recovering.

Bourjeily was one of dozens of peaceful protesters who staged an 8-hour sit-in inside the Environment Ministry in Downtown Beirut Tuesday afternoon, demanding the immediate resignation of Environment Minister Mohamad al-Machnouk for his inability to solve a crippling trash crisis.

A picture showing him unconscious after being severely assaulted by officers went viral Tuesday night, causing public outcry on social media and the press:

But just who is Lucien Bourjeily?

Actor, director, playwright, Bourjeily rose to fame after publicly campaigning against state censorship of theater and film, with the help of MARCH, an NGO that hopes to foster tolerance and diversity within Lebanese society.

Holding an MFA from Loyola Mormont University in Los Angeles, Bourjeily brought improvised acting to the Lebanese stage, in an attempt, as he calls it, to create “immersive and interactive” theater. He has previously led workshops on improvised acting, screenwriting, and directing.

“If I have to describe my art in one word, I would say it’s thought-provoking,” Bourjeily said over the phone. “It provokes thought, like a book provokes you to think and go beyond what is obvious.”

In an LBCI interview from 2011, the award-winning director said he was “using art for social activism,” believing that every work of art has to deliver a pertinent message to its audience.

Bourjeily has repeatedly merged his art with social activism. In May 2014, his passport was confiscated by the Lebanese General Security ahead of a scheduled appearance in London where he was set to present “Bto2ta3… Aw Ma Bto2ta3?” (“Would it Pass or Not?”), an interactive play about censorship of artistic works in Lebanon. His play, which was banned in Lebanon, landed him a nomination by the Index on Censorship for its Freedom of Expression Awards.

CNN listed him as one of eight “leading lights” in Lebanese culture for his innovative work that had local and international impact.

Recently, he brought youth and militants from warring neighborhoods in Tripoli onto the Beirut stage in “Love and War on the Rooftop,” a play that was described “darkly funny” and praised for “confronting the taboo concept of reconciliation.”The production, which was also done in collaboration with MARCH, ran from mid-June to the beginning of August and brought a full house to standing ovation.

“The play has a message of breaking the taboos of sectarian speech and the manipulation of politicians, who are the true enemy of the Lebanese people,” he said.

Bourjeily’s prominent role in the YouStink campaign may have brought him renewed attention, but the activist-artist is no stranger to controversy – or fighting the Lebanese government for the advancement of civil society.

“Art could be a way into the heart and mind of the people,” Bourjeily added. “Art breaks the boundaries of the system.”

Palestinian kid girl is leading protests in the occupied West Bank

Israel is erecting another wall: This time on the borders with Jordan. Why?

So that the Syrian refugees are Not tempted to cross in to Israel.

As if Israel is Europe in the mind of the Syrians!

And Nationalists around the world say: “Why these Refugees Do not return to their Homes

Probably they mean the Palestinians who were forced out of their lands?

Anna Anders's photo.
This 14-year-old Palestinian girl is leading protests in the occupied West Bank.
Watch Again

This 14-year-old Palestinian girl is leading protests in the occupied West Bank.

Najat Rizk shared a link.
Artist Yazan Halwani peels political banners and posters off Beirut’s walls to make room for his murals. Born in the Lebanese capital, Halwani, 22, grew up against…
huffingtonpost.com

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