Adonis Diaries

Archive for September 29th, 2015

New iPhone 6S? Review of this Apple Smartphone

“We have changed everything about these new iPhones.”

Sherif Mktbi shared The Verge.
Apple is introducing the iPhone 6S, an updated version of its flagship smartphone with an identical design and a bundle of new features.
theverge.com

Apple is introducing the iPhone 6S, an updated version of its flagship smartphone with an identical design and a bundle of new features. Chief among them is a pressure-sensitive display, enabling a feature that Apple calls 3D Touch. 3D Touch allows you to press down on the iPhone’s screen to pull up new menus, activate shortcuts, and generally interact with the device in new ways. Apple’s Taptic Engine is also built into the phone to provide feedback. The features will also appear in the new iPhone 6S Plus.

While the iPhone 6S maintains the same design and 4.7-inch display size as the iPhone 6, it’s being offered in a new color: rose gold. There had been some earlier talk that Apple might offer the phone in pink, and it’s easy to see why there was some confusion — rose gold can look very pink in the right light. The phone is also built out of several new materials. It’s using a new aluminum, which Apple says is its own custom alloy. And its display is now covered with a new glass, the same Ion-X that’s used on the Apple Watch Sport. You can bet that these changes are, at least in part, designed to make the phone less prone to bending.

3D Touch enables two new ways to interact with the iPhone, which Apple is calling “peek” and “pop.” Peek allows you to press on app icons and other buttons to pull up shortcuts directly into specific features. Pressing on the Camera app, for instance, offers the option to jump right into taking a selfie. Pressing on the Facebook app gives you the option of updating your status, taking a photo, checking in, or starting a search. Pop allows you to pull up overlays of photos and videos without actually having them take over the screen; once you move away, you’ll be right back to where you were before.

The iPhone 6S is also running on a new 64-bit processor, Apple’s A9. As usual, Apple isn’t giving the nitty gritty details of the processor, but it says that it’s going to be 70 percent faster at CPU tasks and 90 faster at GPU tasks, in both cases over the iPhone 6’s A8 processor.

Apple is putting a 12-megapixel rear camera in the new iPhone. This is the first time that Apple has bumped its camera’s megapixel count since the iPhone 4S in 2011. It’s long held that it wasn’t worth adding pixels because it would lead to noisier images, but Apple claims that it’s now managed to make the change without doing that.

The camera is also now capable of recording 4K video, and it’s supposed to have an improved autofocus in all cases. It also says that the camera has an improved autofocus. One thing that hasn’t changed? The lens still protrudes from the back of the phone.

The front camera is getting a change, too. It’s now a 5-megapixel camera, and Apple has figured out a neat way of giving it a flash: the phone’s display just lights up really bright — apparently up to three times brighter than it usually would. It’ll also customize the color that it flashes to match the ambient lighting of the environment a photo is being taken in.

You’re also going to be taking a lot more videos with this new phone. Apple is introducing a feature called “live photos,” which will capture a short clip of video alongside every photo that you take. You can turn the feature off, but it’s on by default, capturing a second and a half to both sides of every photo.

A 12 megapixel image is still captured right in the middle. It’s a pretty neat idea — even if HTC and others tried features like this years ago — but there’s one reason to be worried about it: storage. All that video is going to take up a lot of space, regardless of how “space efficient” Apple claims they’ll be

Apple is also demonstrating new animated wallpapers on the phone — those may be part of iOS 9 in general, however.

The iPhone 6S is also supposed to be getting faster wireless speeds over both Wi-Fi and LTE. Apple says that Wi-Fi should be twice as fast, and LTE is improving with the addition of more bands, now up to 23. Touch ID is also supposed to be improved on this model of the iPhone. Apple didn’t go into a lot of detail there, but presumably it’ll be faster or more accurate than the sensor on the iPhone 5S and iPhone 6.

The new iPhone will be available starting at $199 on a two-year contract, starting at 16GB of storage and going up to 64GB and 128GB for $100 more per tier. But most carriers are moving away from two-year contracts and over to payment plans now, so Apple is offering some of those, too.

The 6S will be available for $27 per month. But there’s another more interesting payment plan: for $32 per month, you can lease an iPhone and then return it for a new model every single year. It also includes the AppleCare+ warranty from Apple.

Pre-orders begin September 12th, with sales beginning September 25th.

How American Jewish leaders are confronting anti-Muslim bigotry in the presidential race

Why restricting the issues to the Jewish leaders, and how the Jews in Israel respond to these corny questions?

Last Sunday, Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson, who is running second in national pollssaid he did not consider Islam to be “consistent with the Constitution”

And thus “would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation.”

The previous Friday, a man in New Hampshire told Donald Trump, who is running first, that “We have a problem in this country, it’s called Muslims,” then asked, “Can we get rid of them?” Trump’s reply: “We’re going to be looking at that and plenty of other things.”

this Sept. 22, 2015

When CNN asked fellow candidate Ted Cruz whether he agreed with the questioners’ sentiments, the Texas senator refused to answer. “The American people,” he explained, “are not interested in the food fight that reporters are trying to stir up.”

Candidate Rick Santorum would not answer either. “People are entitled to their opinions,” he declared, “whether I disagree with it or agree with it really isn’t the point. The point is that they have the right to say it.” (To their credit, candidates Jeb Bush, Chris Christie and Lindsey Graham criticized Trump’s response).

As it happens, the last few weeks have also witnessed a spate of attacks on American Muslims and their houses of worship: a rock thrown through a mosque window in Nebraska, a burned cross on the lawn of a mosque in upstate New York, racist graffiti on a mosque in Tennessee.

And, most famously, the arrest of a Muslim high school student in Texas who brought his homemade clock to school.

Imagine for a second that this was happening to us. (He means the Jews)

What would American Jews be saying to each other if the man running second for a major party’s presidential nomination had just said that Jews were unfit for the presidency and Judaism was incompatible with the Constitution?

What would we be saying if three prominent presidential candidates refused to condemn the idea that American Jews constituted a “problem” that needed to be gotten “rid of?”

Imagine the mood in synagogue on Yom Kippur on the week these hateful, near-genocidal, anti-Semitic slurs were being broadcast across cable TV.

Then imagine that the same presidential candidates who trafficked in, or excused, anti-Semitism, adored Muslims and Islam. (Mind you that all these are hypothetical imaginations, meant to convince you otherwise)

Imagine if Cruz, while studiously avoiding synagogues, spoke frequently at American mosques.

Imagine if Trump boasted about the fact that his daughter had converted to Islam.

Imagine if polls showed that while only 47 percent of Republicans would vote for a Jew for president, 95 percent would vote for a Muslim.

If this were the America in which we lived, how would we want American Muslims to respond to their privilege and our demonization?

During the current epidemic of anti-Muslim bigotry, that’s the standard to which American Jews should be holding ourselves. And we’re not meeting it. It’s not even close.

Yes, American Jewish groups do sometimes criticize Islamophobia. (Very occasionally)

The Anti-Defamation League, to its credit, has called Carson’s comments “deeply troubling.”

But five years ago, when Muslims proposed building an Islamic Community Center near the World Trade Center, much of whose space would be devoted to interfaith dialogue, the ADL came out in opposition.

The organization has never apologized for so spectacularly betraying its mission of fighting bigotry. Abraham Foxman, who made the decision, remains the ADL’s National Director Emeritus.

The Zionist Organization of America regularly hosts speeches by Pamela Geller, a woman so fanatically anti-Muslim that she defends Josef Stalin’s deportation of Chechens and the Serbian genocide in Bosnia.

The Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, which rejected J Street’s application, considers ZOA a member in good standing.

The Republican Jewish Coalition’s most prominent member is Sheldon Adelson, who has said all the world’s terrorists are Muslim, called Palestinians an “invented people” and proposed dropping a nuclear bomb on Iran. 

The American Jewish establishment should loudly denounce any politician who demonizes an entire religious group. But how can it do so when one of its biggest benefactors does the same thing?

American Jewish leaders cannot effectively confront the anti-Muslim bigotry marring the 2016 presidential race because they cannot effectively confront the anti-Muslim bigotry in their own ranks.

That’s not just a failure of moral courage. It’s a failure of moral imagination. It shouldn’t be hard for American Jews to imagine ourselves on the other side when politicians scapegoat a vulnerable minority.

But privilege can be a narcotic.

On Monday, after a weekend in which Trump and Carson’s hateful words dominated the news, the websites of the Presidents Conference, the American Jewish Committee, the Jewish Federations of America, and AIPAC said nothing on the topic at all.

The message: It’s not our problem.

We claim to be a people with a long memory. Sometimes, sadly, it’s not long enough.

Note: In Israel, the extremist Jews have been bombing, and putting on fire the Mosques, and invading the Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem.

The Jews in Israel and elsewhere would also refuse to have a Moslem or a Christian be President of Israel. No different from the Islamic States. Or the European Christian States.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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