Adonis Diaries

Archive for April 4th, 2016

No gluten sensitivity anymore? And the reactions are the consequences of what sensitivities?

People can go back now to just eating wheat?

In one of the best examples of science working, a researcher who provided key evidence of (non-celiac disease) gluten sensitivity recently published follow-up papers that show the opposite.

The paper came out last year in the journal Gastroenterology.

Here’s the backstory that makes us cheer: The study was a follow up on a 2011 experiment in the lab of Peter Gibson at Monash University in Australia. The scientifically sound – but small – study found that gluten-containing diets can cause gastrointestinal distress in people without celiac disease, a well-known auto-immune disorder triggered by gluten. They called this non-celiac gluten sensitivity

Maha Issa shared this post
sciencealert.com|By JENNIFER WELSH, Business Insider

Gluten is a protein composite found in wheat, barley, and other grains. It gives bread its chewiness and is often used as a meat substitute: If you’ve ever had ‘wheat meat’, seitan, or mock duck at a Thai restaurant, that’s gluten.

Gluten is a big industry: 30 percent of people want to eat less gluten. Sales of gluten-free products are estimated to hit $US15 billion by 2016.

Although experts estimate that only 1 percent of Americans – about 3 million people – actually suffer from celiac disease, 18 percent of adults now buy gluten-free foods.

Since gluten is a protein found in any normal diet, Gibson was unsatisfied with his finding. He wanted to find out why the gluten seemed to be causing this reaction and if there could be something else going on. He therefore went to a scientifically rigorous extreme for his next experiment, a level not usually expected in nutrition studies. (Really? Health issues, and specifically nutrition studies, don’t require rigorous experiments?)

For a follow-up paper, 37 self-identified gluten-sensitive patients were tested. According to Real Clear Science’s Newton Blog, here’s how the experiment went:

Subjects would be provided with every single meal for the duration of the trial.

Any and all potential dietary triggers for gastrointestinal symptoms would be removed, including lactose (from milk products), certain preservatives like benzoates, propionate, sulfites, and nitrites, and fermentable, poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates, also known as FODMAPs.

And last, but not least, nine days worth of urine and faecal matter would be collected. With this new study, Gibson wasn’t messing around.

The subjects cycled through high-gluten, low-gluten, and no-gluten (placebo) diets, without knowing which diet plan they were on at any given time.

In the end, all of the treatment diets – even the placebo diet – caused pain, bloating, nausea, and gas to a similar degree. It didn’t matter if the diet contained gluten. (Read more about the study.)

“In contrast to our first study… we could find absolutely no specific response to gluten,” Gibson wrote in the paper.

A third, larger study published this month has confirmed the findings.

It seems to be a ‘nocebo’ effect – the self-diagnosed gluten sensitive patients expected to feel worse on the study diets, so they did. They were also likely more attentive to their intestinal distress, since they had to monitor it for the study.

On top of that, these other potential dietary triggers – specifically the FODMAPS – could be causing what people have wrongly interpreted as gluten sensitivity. FODMAPS are frequently found in the same foods as gluten.

That still doesn’t explain why people in the study negatively reacted to diets that were free of all dietary triggers.

You can go ahead and smell your bread and eat it too. Science. It works.

 

The Facade of Israel is Cracking

shutterstock_274979960

For many more years than any intelligent person would want to count, Israel was the sacred cow of the United States. (How about since the 60’s? Israel relied on the funds of the US Jews since 1940)

From its violent, bloody, genocidal inception that involved the ethnic cleansing of at least 750,000 Palestinians, and the murder of another 10,000, right through to the illegal, immoral occupation of the West Bank and blockade (aka occupation) of the Gaza Strip, Israel, in the view of U.S. governance and politics, could do no wrong.

Anyone who dared to criticize Israel’s many crimes was accused of anti-Semitism;

As Dr. Norman Finkelstein said, “whenever Israel faces a public relations debacle, its apologists sound the alarm that a ‘new anti-Semitism’ is upon us”.

In the past, if a Jew, such as Dr. Finkelstein, was critical of Israel, Zionists raised the cry that he was ‘a self-hating Jew’, and U.S. politicians bought that ridiculous line.

As a result, Israel became the beneficiary of the bulk of U.S. foreign aid, and has relied on the U.S. for years for protection from international accountability for its crimes, with the U.S always happy to veto any United Nations resolution condemning Israeli violations of human rights and international law.

Oh, but what a difference a 51-day, genocidal onslaught can make!

This refers to the invasion and carpet-bombing of the Gaza Strip during the summer of 2014.

Israel had previously been able to ‘mow the grass’, as it refers to these periodic bombing episodes, with complete impunity. But thanks largely to social media, the world stopped believing that vulnerable, little Israel, with the fourth largest military in the world, and supplied and backed by the largest, was in grave danger from Big Bad Palestine, a nation it illegally occupies, and which has no army, navy or air force.

On-going settlement activity by apartheid Israel, along with Israeli Prime Murderer Benjamin Netanyahu’s declaration that Palestinians would never have an independent state while he is prime murderer, and a conflicted relationship with his favorite check-writer, President Barack Obama, seem to have soured the whole thing for Israel.

(Obama lost confidence in Netanyahu because he could deliver on the 2 States and stop further settlement, but Israel internal politics refused to go ahead with even a minor arrangement)

How is this manifesting itself? Well, in a variety of ways.

Mr. Obama has ordered that goods produced by Israel in the occupied West Bank must clearly state that that is the case; they cannot say ‘manufactured in Israel’ anymore. This has brought down the wrath of Zionists everywhere.

Against Israeli wishes, the U.S., along with European Union, the United Kingdom, Russia, China, France and Germany entered into an agreement with Iran that regulates that nation’s nuclear program.

Various Israeli lobbies spent around $40 million opposing this agreement, to no avail.

And Mr. Netanyahu has been saying for decades that Iran is only months away from nuclear weapons. Time must be measured somewhat differently in Israel than it is in the rest of the world. (Before Iran, Israel has been proclaiming that Iraq is the most powerful enemy to Israel existence, and the region is paying the heavy price from Iraq invasion in 2003)

Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential candidate hopeful Bernie Sanders did the unthinkable this year: he skipped the AIPAC (Apartheid Israel Political Affairs Committee) convention this month. He did, however, send a letter, in which he added insult to injury, when he not only recognized the existence of the Palestinians, but also acknowledged that they have legitimate rights to self-determination! Absolutely inconceivable for a U.S. politician!

But it gets worse (for Zionists).

On March 29, the other senator from Vermont, Patrick Leahy, sent a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry (aka, Israel’s whipping boy), signed by himself and ten members of the House of Representatives, requesting that the State Department investigate possible human rights violations by Israel, saying that if Israel is so guilty, U.S. law requires that aid to it is adjusted.  (The US has funded Israel with more than $200 billion so far, from US tax payers)

Such aid to any country is conditioned upon that country’s adherence to international law in the area of human rights, and Mr. Leahy has received credible word (which the rest of the world has been privy to for years), that Israel is, perhaps, in violation.

The international scene is not boding much better for Israel.

The European Union, like the U.S. (and leading the way, of course; one must not expect leadership in human rights to emanate from the United States), now requires that Israeli products from the occupied West Bank be clearly stated as such. And much to the horror of FOX News, the United Nations named Israel the top human rights violator in the world, due to its killing of women and children in Palestine.

Now, the news is not all bad. It is likely that either wind-bag businessman Donald Trump, or Miss 1% herself, Hillary Clinton, will be the next president of the United States, and there is no Israeli hoop through which they are not willing to jump.

Zionists were treated to more butt-kissing at the AIPAC convention from each of the candidates, with desperate and despicable Senator Ted Cruz (R – TX) going so far as to deny the very existence of Palestine! (That is what Golda Meyer PM said in the 70’s)

Such a proclamation may have soothed the hurt their feelings sustained by the words of Mr. Sanders. But outside the convention hall, pro-Palestinian demonstrators (including this writer), detracted perhaps just a little bit from the fun of the Zionist bacchanal going on inside the convention hall.

And let us not lose sight of the fact that the U.S. is fomenting all kinds of wars and uprisings in the Middle East, mainly to prevent any other country from challenging Israeli superiority in the area.

This is an old model; as early as 1961, the U.S. opposed its previously hand-picked Iraqi leader, Abdel Karim Kassem, when he began to build up armaments, and talked of challenging Israeli dominance.

So, since such a thing was unheard of, he was overthrown by the CIA, which installed his successor, one Saddam Hussein. We won’t consider now how well that all turned out.

But it does seem that poor little Israel is finally beginning to get the short end of the stick with which it has been bashing Palestinians for decades. Yes, a new president will pucker-up sufficiently, but the narrative has changed; things cannot return to the status quo once that obnoxious concept – facts – that the U.S. has no use for, has been let out of the box.

What will it mean? It is too early to tell how it will play out; AIPAC will do everything in its considerable power to assure that Congress remains firmly under its thumb.

But as it unsuccessfully unleashed its power to defeat the Iran nuclear agreement, even sending Mr. Netanyahu to address Congress about it, it will be unsuccessful in seizing back the narrative.

So we can all expect to hear more cries of anti-Semitism, anytime anyone condemns Israeli crimes. We will hear more about how the Israeli army is the most moral in the world, as more and more videos show Israeli soldiers shooting unarmed and unthreatening men, women and children. We will hear how Israel is the only democracy in the Middle East, as its apartheid laws cause untold suffering for non-Israelis, and non-Jewish Israelis.

But the light is now clearly visible at the end of the tunnel; the train of justice is barreling down, and Israel will only be a minor impediment, slowing it, possibly, but unable to stop it. When it reaches the station, Palestine will be free.

Robert Fantina’s latest book is Empire, Racism and Genocide: a History of US Foreign Policy (Red Pill Press).

 The selective outrage of Lebanese

Lebenon is a tiny country with so many dailies and magazines (mostly funded by foreign countries) and a dozen TV channels.

In other countries, people tend to local media for their local news. In Lebanon, we have to cover the political spectrum of the entire world and little events that happened in unknown countries.

Like a derailed train that didn’t generate any injuries (simply because we dismantled our train system 5 decades ago)

Like a place of Qatar that was forced to land in Russia because of bad weather.

Not to mention the heavy war events in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Libya…

Or the elections in every country, however small and insignificant is the country.

Or rerunning the suicide attacks in Belgium and Paris for weeks, knowing that these countries barely covered a single of the suicide bombing that we suffered at a greater scale…

Claude El Khal posted this April 3, 2016 .

How easy it is to be outraged by a stupid comment made by a silly celebrity named Ahlam or by a not-so-clever cartoon published by some Saudi newspaper calling Lebanon a lie.

But what about the 8 years old Lebanese girl that was killed by a stray bullet only a few days ago, because some moron was celebrating something and thought it would be a good idea the fire some shots in the air? Anyone? No? Really?

What about the Ethiopian domestic worker that was found dead in south Lebanon, after allegedly committing suicide by stabbing herself in the throat?

Not to mention the other Ethiopian domestic worker that threw herself off a balcony in north Lebanon, just a few weeks ago. Still nothing? Ok…

Then what about the recently busted Beirut sex slave ring that used and abused underage Syrian girls? Also nothing?

What? These stories don’t inspire patriotic poems vehemently posted on social media? They don’t drive the urge to shout out “I’m proud to be Lebanese” or to sing “koullouna lil watan” in a sunny private garden, before rushing to some chic lunch somewhere?
I’m very sorry but I can’t continue writing any further. I urgently need to find a pharmacy open on Sunday so I can get something, anything, to fight off the overwhelming nausea many of my fellow Lebanese inspire me.

Are you familiar with SMIS?  http://claudeelkhal.blogspot.com/…/seven-minutes…

SMIS: Seven Minutes Indignation Syndrome. This new syndrome can be easily diagnosed as most Lebanese suffer from it.
SMIS can only be detected when something shocking, unfair or unjust makes the evening news or creates a buzz on the Internet.

Suddenly, within seconds, everyone ignites. Angry statuses are pounded on Facebook. Outraged tweets fly all over the country. The web is on fire. The world better watch out.

Everyone takes up the cause, raises its flag, and swears he or she will do everything in their power to ensure that this horrendous thing, whatever it is, will never be allowed to happen again.
The whole nation becomes an army of glorious Jedi knights, invincible, unbreakable and unstoppable, marching under the same banner, chanting the same chants, drumming the same drums.When Lebanese are under the influence of SMIS, it is strongly recommended that you follow the stream if you don’t want to be crushed by the enraged lynch mob. The use of brain is utterly pointless, but the nod is of paramount importance.

On Facebook for example, you should never try to reason or debate during a SMIS crisis.

You should keep “liking” until it passes. You can even join the outcry by throwing in some offended comments or be a sycophant and post your own fierce status.

But you should be careful not to overdo it, as the blaze of indignation burns out as fast as it lights up.

You don’t want be the one who keeps ranting, do you?

Seven minutes after the call for revolution, everyone calms down, then simply forgets, until the next crisis comes along, the next shocking, unfair or unjust thing makes the news or creates a buzz.

Of course, between one SMIS crisis and the next, no one does a thing to right the wrongs, and the shocking, unfair and unjust remains as shocking, as unfair and as unjust.

Note:  In response to a post wondering why Lebanese exhibit selective outrage (particularly on matters that do Not affect their daily survival), I said that if we desist from selective outrage in Lebanon we end up with a long list of distressed half cooked outrages. Ma fi shi bi 2oul lel 2alb to2. And I received this link from Claude

 

How a teen taught himself 20 languages — and what he learned in the process

During the past few years, I’ve been referred to in the media as “The World’s Youngest Hyper-polyglot” — a word that sounds like a rare illness.

In a way it is: it describes someone who speaks a particularly large number of foreign languages, someone whose all-consuming passion for words and systems can lead them to spend many long hours alone with a grammar book.

“If the standard of speaking a language is to know every word — to feel equally at home debating nuclear fission and classical music — then hardly anyone is fluent in their own native tongues.”

Timothy Doner was quickly hailed as a prodigy for his linguistic proficiency.
t.ted.com

But while it’s true that I can speak in 20 different languages, including English, it took me a while to understand that there’s more to language than bartering over kebabs in Arabic or ordering from a menu in Hindi. Fluency is another craft altogether.

I began my language education at age thirteen.

I became interested in the Middle East and started studying Hebrew on my own. For reasons I still don’t quite understand, I was soon hooked on the Israeli funk group Hadag Nachash, and would listen to the same album every single morning.

At the end of a month, I had memorized about twenty of their songs by heart — even though I had no clue what they meant.

But once I learned the translations it was almost as if I had downloaded a dictionary into my head; I now knew several hundred Hebrew words and phrases — and I’d never had to open a textbook.

I decided to experiment.

I spent hours walking around my New York City neighborhood, visiting Israeli cafés to eavesdrop on people’s conversations. Sometimes, I would even get up the courage to introduce myself, rearranging all of the song lyrics in my head into new, awkward and occasionally correct sentences. As it turned out, I was on to something.

I moved on to Arabic, which I’d study every morning by reading news headlines with a dictionary and by talking to street vendors.

After that it was Persian, then Russian, then Mandarin … and about fifteen others. On an average day, I’d Skype with friends in French and Turkish, listen to Hindi pop music for an hour and eat dinner with a Greek or Latin book on my lap.

Language became an obsession, one that I pursued in summer classes, school, web forums and language meet-ups around the city.

By March of 2012, media outlets such as the BBC and The New York Times featured stories about me, “The Teen Who Speaks 20 Languages!” For a while, it was a fantasy; it made what many thought of as a bizarre hobby seem (almost) mainstream, and gave me a perfect opportunity to promote language learning.

After a while, though, my media “moments” felt more like gruesome chores than opportunities to spread the word.

Most news shows were interested only in the “dancing bear” act (“You wanna learn more about the Middle East? Cool… Say ‘you’re watching Channel 2’ in Arabic!”)

As lighthearted as that might have been, it left me with an uncomfortably personal lesson in modern media: when the goal is simply to get the viewers’ attention, the real importance of a story often gets lost in translation.

When I was beginning to discover languages, I had a romanticized view of words like “speak” and “fluency”. But then I realized that you can be nominally fluent in a language and still struggle to understand parts of it.

English is my first language, but what I really spoke was a hybrid of teenage slang and Manhattan-ese. When I listen to my father, a lawyer, talk to other lawyers, his words sound as foreign to me as Finnish.

I certainly couldn’t read Shakespeare Without a dictionary, and I’d be equally helpless in a room with Jamaicans or Cajuns. Yet all of us “speak English.”

My linguistics teacher, a native of Poland, speaks better English than I do and seems right at home peppering his speech with terms like “epenthetic schwa” and “voiceless alveolar stops”.

Yet the other day, it came up that he’d never heard the word “tethered”. Does that mean he doesn’t “speak” English? If the standard of speaking a language is to know every word — to feel equally at home debating nuclear fission and classical music — then hardly anyone is fluent in their own native tongues.

Reducing someone to the number of languages he or she speaks trivializes the immense power that language imparts.

After all, language is the living testament to a culture’s history and world view, not a shiny trophy to be dusted off for someone’s self-aggrandizement.

Language is a complex tapestry of trade, conquest and culture to which we each add our own unique piece — whether that be a Shakespearean sonnet or “Lol bae g2g ttyl.”

As my time in the media spotlight made me realize, saying you “speak” a language can mean a lot of different things: it can mean memorizing verb charts, knowing the slang, even passing for a native.

But while I’ve come to realize I’ll never be fluent in 20 languages, I’ve also understood that language is about being able to converse with people, to see beyond cultural boundaries and find a shared humanity. And that’s a lesson well worth learning.

Watch Breaking the language barrier, Timothy Doner’s talk at TEDxTeen 2014. Featured illustration by Dawn Kim/TED.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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