Adonis Diaries

Machine guns for freedom and liberty?

Posted on: June 20, 2016

Machine guns for freedom and liberty?

If these data are accurate from Neil deGrasse Tyson, you have the answer

Peter Cortez's photo.

Peter Cortez commented. June 17 at 7:13pm ·

Instead of arguing about guns on Twitter, Neil deGrasse Tyson just laid out the numbers.

Compare These Gun Death Rates: The U.S. Is in a Different World

By JUNE 13, 2016

The mass shooting in Orlando on Sunday was appalling in scale: 49 killed in a single attack. But it’s not unusual for dozens of Americans to be killed by guns in a single day.

Gun homicides are a common cause of death in the United States, killing about as many people as car crashes (not counting van, truck, motorcycle or bus accidents).

Some cases command our attention more than others, of course. Counting mass shootings that make headlines and the thousands of Americans murdered one or a few at a time, gunshot homicides totaled 8,124 in 2014, according to the F.B.I.

This level of violence makes the United States an extreme outlier when measured against the experience of other advanced countries.

Around the world, those countries have substantially lower rates of deaths from gun homicide.

In Germany, being murdered with a gun is as uncommon as being killed by a falling object in the United States. About two people out of every million are killed in a gun homicide. Gun homicides are just as rare in several other European countries, including the Netherlands and Austria.

In the United States, two per million is roughly the death rate for hypothermia or plane crashes.

In Poland and England, only about one out of every million people die in gun homicides each year — about as often as an American dies in an agricultural accident or falling from a ladder.

In Japan, where gun homicides are even rarer, the likelihood of dying this way is about the same as an American’s chance of being killed by lightning — roughly one in 10 million.

To give you a sense of how unusual America’s gun violence problem is, consider the daily death toll compared with other Western democracies.

The chart below imagines that the populations of those countries were the same as the population of the United States.

No Other Rich Western Country Comes Close

Gun homicides per day if each country had the same population as the U.S.
$40,000
60,000
80,000
100,000
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
G.D.P. per capita
United States
Luxembourg
Norway
Ireland
Austria
Germany
Australia
Canada
Iceland
Finland
Spain
Slovenia
Portugal
Lithuania
Greece

Gun homicides per day if each country had the same population as the U.S.
$50,000
100,000
30
20
10
0
G.D.P. per capita
United States
Luxembourg
Norway
Canada
Greece
Poland
Hungary

International comparisons help highlight how exceptional the United States is: In a nation where the right to bear arms is cherished by much of the population, gun homicides are a significant public health concern.

For men 15 to 29, they are the third-leading cause of death, after accidents and suicides.

In other high-income countries, gun homicides are unusual events. Last year’s Paris attacks killed 130 people, which is nearly as many as die from gun homicides in all of France in a typical year.

But even if France had a mass shooting as deadly as the Paris attacks every month, its annual rate of gun homicide death would be lower than that in the United States.

The accompanying table shows the mortality rates for gun homicides in a variety of countries, along with a correspondingly likely cause of death in the United States.

Being killed with a gun here: Is about as likely as
Dying of ________ in the U.S.
Deaths per mil.

Our gun homicide numbers come from the Small Arms Survey, a Swiss nonprofit affiliated with the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, and represent the average gun homicide death rates in those countries between 2007 and 2012.

The United States death rates come from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over those same years. There are more recent statistics on American gun deaths, like the F.B.I. number at the top of this article, but we chose these years to provide fair comparisons.

We focused on the rates of gun homicides; the overall rate of gun deaths is substantially higher, because suicides make up a majority of gun deaths in the United States and are also higher than in other developed countries.

The rate of gun violence in the United States is not the highest in the world.

In parts of Central America, Africa and the Middle East, the gun death rates are even higher — close to those from heart attacks and lung cancer in the United States.

In neighboring Mexico, where a drug war rages, 122 people per million die in a gun homicide, a rate slightly higher than Americans’ death rate from pancreatic cancer.

But the countries with those levels of gun violence are not like the United States in many other ways, including G.D.P., life expectancy and education. Among developed democracies, the United States is an outlier.

Editor’s note: A version of this article was first published in December 2015 and was updated after the Orlando shootings.

The table is not meant to make light of rare causes of death. Instead, we show them as a way to help think meaningfully about the differences among gun death rates.

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