Adonis Diaries

Archive for April 22nd, 2017

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question “Why design?” Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

Philippe Starck. Designer. Designs deluxe objects and posh condos and hotels around the world. Always witty and engaged, he takes special delight in rethinking everyday objects. Full bio

Filmed March 2007

You will understand nothing with my type of English. It’s good for you because you can have a break after all these fantastic people. I must tell you I am like that, not very comfortable, because usually, in life, I think my job is absolutely useless.

I mean, I feel useless. Now after Carolyn, and all the other guys, I feel like shit. And definitively, I don’t know why I am here, but — you know the nightmare you can have, like you are an impostor, you arrive at the opera, and they push you, “You must sing!” I don’t know. (Laughter)

1:06 So, because I have nothing to show, nothing to say, we shall try to speak about something else. We can start, if you want, by understanding — it’s just to start, it’s not interesting, but — how I work.

When somebody comes to me and ask for what I am known for, I mean, yes, lemon squeezer, toilet brush, toothpick, beautiful toilet seats, and why not — a toothbrush? I don’t try to design the toothbrush. I don’t try to say, “Oh, that will be a beautiful object,” or something like that. That doesn’t interest me.

there is different types of design.

The one, we can call it the cynical design, that means the design invented by Raymond Loewy in the ’50s, who said, what is ugly is a bad sale, la laideur se vend mal, which is terrible. It means the design must be just the weapon for marketing, for producer to make product more sexy, like that, they sell more: it’s shit, it’s obsolete, it’s ridiculous. I call that the cynical design. (In that period products had quality and durability) 

there is the narcissistic design: it’s a fantastic designer who designs only for other fantastic designers. (Laughter)

And, there is people like me, who try to deserve to exist, and who are so ashamed to make this useless job, who try to do it in another way, and they try, I try, to not make the object (Not) for the object but for the result, for the profit for the human being, the person who will use it.

If we take the toothbrush — I don’t think about the toothbrush. I think, “What will be the effect of the brush in the mouth?” And to understand what will be the effect of the toothbrush in the mouth, I must imagine: Who owns this mouth? What is the life of the owner of this mouth? In what society [does] this guy live? What civilization creates this society? What animal species creates this civilization? When I arrive — and I take one minute, I am not so intelligent — when I arrive at the level of animal species, that becomes real interesting.

 I have strictly no power to change anything. But when I come back, I can understand why I shall not do it, because today to not do it, it’s more positive than do it, or how I shall do it.

But to come back, where I am at the animal species, there is things to see, there is the big challenge. The big challenge in front of us. Because there is not a human production which exists outside of what I call “the big image.”

The big image is our story, our poetry, our romanticism. Our poetry is our mutation, our life. We must remember, and we can see that in any book of my son of 10 years old, that life appears four billion years ago, around — four billion point two?

 I’m a designer, that’s all, of Christmas gifts. And before, there was this soup, called “soupe primordiale,” this first soup — bloop bloop bloop — sort of dirty mud, no life, nothing. So then — pshoo-shoo — lightning — pshoo — arrive — pshoo-shoo — makes life — bloop bloop — and that dies.

Some million years after — pshoo-shoo, bloop-bloop — ah, wake up! At the end, finally, that succeeds, and life appears. We were so stupid. The most stupid bacteria. Even, I think, we copy our way to reproduce, you know what I mean, and something of — oh no, forget it.

After, we become a fish; after, we become a frog; after, we become a monkey; after, we become what we are today: a super-monkey, and the fun is, the super-monkey we are today, is at half of the story.

Can you imagine? From that stupid bacteria to us, with a microphone, with a computer, with an iPod: four billion years. And we know, and especially Carolyn knows, that when the sun will implode, the earth will burn, explode, I don’t know what, and this is scheduled in four billion years? Yes, she said, something like that.

OK, that means we are at half of the story. Fantastic! It’s a beauty! Can you imagine? It’s very symbolic. Because the bacteria we was had no idea of what we are today. And today, we have no idea of what we shall be in four billion years. And this territory is fantastic.

That is our poetry. That is our beautiful story. It’s our romanticism. Mu-ta-tion.

We are mutants. And if we don’t deeply understand, if we don’t integrate that we are mutants, we completely miss the story.

Because every generation thinks we are the final one. We have a way to look at Earth like that, you know, “I am the man. The final man. You know, we mutate during four billion years before, but now, because it’s me, we stop. Fin. (Laughter) For the end, for the eternity, it is one with a red jacket. Something like that. I am not sure of that. (Laughter) Because that is our intelligence of mutation and things like that. There is so many things to do; it’s so fresh.

And here is something: nobody is obliged to be a genius, but everybody is obliged to participate.

And to participate, for a mutant, there is a minimum of exercise, a minimum of sport. We can say that. The first, if you want — there is so many — but one which is very easy to do, is the duty of vision. I can explain you. I shall try. If you walk like that, it’s OK, it’s OK, you can walk, but perhaps, because you walk with the eyes like that, you will not see, oh, there is a hole. And you will fall, and you will die. Dangerous.

8:46 That’s why, perhaps, you will try to have this angle of vision. OK, I can see, if I found something, up, up, and they continue, up up up. I raise the angle of vision, but it’s still very — selfish, selfish, egoiste — yes, selfish. You, you survive. It’s OK.

If you raise the level of your eyes a little more you go, “I see you, oh my God you are here, how are you, I can help you, I can design for you a new toothbrush, new toilet brush,” something like that.

I live in society; I live in community. It’s OK. You start to be in the territory of intelligence, we can say. From this level, the more you can raise this angle of view, the more you will be important for the society. The more you will rise, the more you will be important for the civilization. The more you will rise, to see far and high, like that, the more you will be important for the story of our mutation.

That means intelligent people are in this angle. That is intelligence. From this to here, it’s genius. Ptolemy, Eratosthenes, Einstein, things like that. Nobody’s obliged to be a genius. It’s better, but nobody.

Take care, in this training, to be a good mutant. There is some danger, there is some trap.

One trap: the vertical. Because at the vertical of us, if you look like that, “Ah! my God, there is God. Ah! God!” God is a trap. God is the answer when we don’t know the answer. That means, when your brain is not big enough, when you don’t understand, you go, “Ah, it’s God, it’s God.” That’s ridiculous. That’s why — jump, like that? No, don’t jump. Come back. Because, after, there is another trap. If you look like that, you look to the past, or you look inside if you are very flexible, inside yourself. It’s called schizophrenia, and you are dead also.

That’s why every morning, now, because you are a good mutant, you will raise your angle of view. Out, more of the horizontal. You are an intelligence. Never forget — like that, like that. It’s very, very, very important. What, what else we can say about that? Why do that? It’s because we — if we look from far, we see our line of evolution.

This line of evolution is clearly positive. From far, this line looks very smooth, like that. But if you take a lens, like that, this line is ack, ack, ack, ack, ack. Like that. It’s made of light and shadow. We can say light is civilization, shadow is barbaria. And it’s very important to know where we are. Because some cycle, there is a spot in the cycle, and you have not the same duty in the different parts of the cycle.

That means, we can imagine — I don’t say it was fantastic, but in the ’80s, there was not too much war, like that, it was — we can imagine that the civilization can become civilized. In this case, people like me are acceptable.

We can say, “It’s luxurious time.” We have time to think, we have time to speak about art and things like that. It’s OK. We are in the light. But sometimes, like today, we fall, we fall so fast, so fast to shadow, we fall so fast to barbaria.

With many face of barbaria. Because it’s not, the barbaria we have today, it’s perhaps not the barbaria we think.

There is different type of barbaria. That’s why we must adapt. That means, when barbaria is back, forget the beautiful chairs, forget the beautiful hotel, forget design, even — I’m sorry to say — forget art. Forget all that. There is priority; there is urgency. You must go back to politics, you must go back to radicalization, I’m sorry if that’s not very English. You must go back to fight, to battle.

That’s why today I’m so ashamed to make this job. That’s why I am here, to try to do it the best possible.

But I know that even I do it the best possible — that’s why I’m the best — it’s nothing. Because it’s not the right time. That’s why I say that. I say that, because, I repeat, nothing exist if it’s not in the good reason, the reason of our beautiful dream, of this civilization.

And because we must all work to finish this story. Because the scenario of this civilization — about love, progress, and things like that — it’s OK, but there is so many different, other scenarios of other civilizations.

This scenario, of this civilization, was about becoming powerful, intelligent, like this idea we have invented, this concept of God. We are God now. We are. It’s almost done. We have just to finish the story. That is very, very important. And when you don’t understand really what’s happened, you cannot go and fight and work and build and things like that. You go to the future back, back, back, back, like that. And you can fall, and it’s very dangerous. No, you must really understand that.

15:39 Because we have almost finished, I’ll repeat this story. And the beauty of this, in perhaps 50 years, 60 years, we can finish completely this civilization, and offer to our children the possibility to invent a new story, a new poetry, a new romanticism.

With billions of people who have been born, worked, lived and died before us, these people who have worked so much, we have now bring beautiful things, beautiful gifts, we know so many things. We can say to our children, OK, done, that was our story. That passed.

Now you have a duty: invent a new story. Invent a new poetry. The only rule is, we have not to have any idea about the next story. We give you white pages. Invent. We give you the best tools, the best tools, and now, do it. That’s why I continue to work, even if it’s for toilet brush.

Patsy Z shared this link
Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question “Why design?” Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.
ted.com
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Do you feel you are an introvert? Do you believe in Brainstorming session?

Cocktail party trivia: Brainstorming was invented in the 1930s as a practical idea-generation technique for regular use by “creatives” within the ad agency BBDO.

That all changed in 1942, when Alex Osborn — the “O” in BBDO — released a book called How to Think Up and excited the imaginations of his fellow Mad Men.

Since 1942, the idea-generation technique that began life in a New York creative firm has grown into the happy kudzu of Silicon Valley startups.

Somewhere near Stanford, an introvert cringes every time the idea comes up of sitting in a roomful of colleagues, drawing half-baked ideas on Post-it notes, and then pasting them to the wall for all to see.

(If this is you, watch David Kelley’s TED Talk on creative confidence, followed by Susan Cain’s on the power of introverts.)

I’ve run a lot of brainstorms over the years: with designers at IDEO, with Tom and David Kelley (I co-authored the book Creative Confidence with them), and with TED’s editorial team.

And I’ve noticed that Not everyone is down with the whole brainstorm thing. (I’m one not to believe in that technique)

In fact, I’ve come to believe that there’s no one right way to run a brainstorm.

You have to be willing to modify the format, length and parameters of each session to match the mix of introverts, extroverts and creative confidence levels in the room.

Below, 12 tips on how to run a killer brainstorm for (mostly) introverts:

  1. Circulate the question or topic before you start. For introverts who generate ideas best without the looming presence of others, knowing the topic in advance is key. This allows them to come prepared with several creative options — and not feel stampeded by extroverts who prefer to riff.
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  2. Seat the group at a round table. It worked for King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.
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  3. Keep each session short. 10 minutes at the end of a regular meeting is fine, as some people might get a case of the woozies if they see a 60-minute session pop up on their calendar.
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  4. Number the group list of ideas as it’s generated. Skip the Post-its and just use big pieces of paper on the table, or a whiteboard if there happens to be one. The numbering part helps people feel especially accomplished as they go. A mental pat-on-the-back.
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  5. Aim for a specific quantity of ideas. 25 ideas, say. Let people know the goal at the start, and don’t stop till you get there. Keep going after you reach the goal if you want, but that’s just gravy.
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  6. Start at your left and go around the circle. Each person gives one idea at a time. No one gets skipped over. This will help you hear from all members of the group—and not just the ones with the loudest voices.
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  7. The default mode for a successful brainstorm is “Yes, and.” As in comedy improv, good brainstormers don’t waste time tearing down silly-sounding ideas. Instead, they either improve on the idea by adding something awesome to it, or generate a new idea quickly. Another way to phrase this is “build on the ideas of others.” This is one guideline I always mention at the beginning of every brainstorm, and reinforce throughout, since it’s the exact opposite of how large, traditional corporations tend to work with new ideas. The goal at this stage is to remix and add to others’ ideas — not filter or critique.
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  8. Write down every single idea that’s mentioned, and take a neutral, respectful stance toward each idea. Consciously or subconsciously, others will cue off your lead. You want everyone in the room to feel heard, to have permission to speak their piece, and to defer judgment during the brainstorm. Pro tip: Don’t attach people’s names to ideas.
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  9. Share back the unfiltered ideas list after the brainstorm ends. You can share this in an email, as a Google Doc — whatever’s best for your team. You never know which stub of an idea might spark the next great thing for someone else on your team.
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  10. If the word ‘brainstorm’ doesn’t work for you or your group, don’t use it. Call it design improv, call it a pitch jam, call it a ‘5-minute think’ — whatever. The name is way less important than the goal, which is to get people together in a manner that allows them to generate ideas worth spreading or solutions to problems worth fixing.
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  11. Modification #1: Passive brainstorm, 5-day version. One successful alternative to an in-person group brainstorm, if you’re all physically in the same office, is to tape a large piece of paper to an office wall near the kitchen or bathroom, with your question at the top and a pen for writing in answers (at IDEO, blackboard paint on the bathroom wall worked well). Leave it up for 5 days, then take a picture and transcribe it.
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  12. Modification #2: Passive brainstorm, 5-minute version. A second alternative to a meeting-room brainstorm is to throw a 5-minute inspiration break around 3 in the afternoon, when people tend to need a boost anyway. To kick it off, send a group email (or whatever works for your company culture) with the subject line: “5-minute inspiration break: [your question here]” — and ask them to discuss. One caveat: This method works best when you start the email string with a few options you’re already considering, and keep it time-boxed to 5 minutes.

Like other idea-generation tools, brainstorming was invented to make creative success easier, not more stressful — which is why creators are still using this technique 75 years after its invention. But coming up with lots of great ideas is just one step. The crucial next phase, often in a smaller group: filter the ideas list and start picking the best ideas to move forward on.

Patsy Z  shared  this link

12 tips on how to run a brainstorm where introverts can be heard:

Creative ideas to help you run an effective brainstorm that everyone can participate in (not just the loudest few in the room).
t.ted.com

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