Adonis Diaries

Family Income Supplement for low salary workers: In Ireland?

Posted on: May 6, 2017

 

Workers on low salaries can claim FIS – Family Income Supplement

Title: Family Income Supplement (FIS) is a weekly tax-free payment for families, including one-parent families, at work on low pay.

Author: Citizen’s Information

Full Text & Source: http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/social_welfare/social_welfare_payments/social_welfare_payments_to_families_and_children/family_income_supplement.html
The Internet, Online, 21/01/2015

Writers/bloggers if you are on low salaries and have a child or children look into FIS, medical cards and back to school uniforms, free pre school year, free prescription drugs if you have a long term illness & other entitlements on the Citizens Information Database: http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/.

You would be strongly advised to meet your local welfare officer and bring all your bills: rent or mortgage, ESB, phone, Internet, car insurance, house insurance, food, clothes, property tax, water charges etc.

List your income and all the costs going out of your wages on a weekly basis. Ask her or him to help you fill in the FIS form and ask about medical card and help with school books & uniforms etc.

If you get FIS the minimum payment is €20, a €1,040 a year. The local welfare officer is an expert in helping people get their benefits, listen to them and do as they recommend.

If you have one child you must be earning over €26,312 not to qualify. If you are working odd hours your partner can go and meet the welfare officer for your family and bring your bank details. Of course, you can just print the form and apply for it yourself. Please include bank account details for them to pay you.

How much can I get?
Your FIS payment is 60% of the difference between your average weekly family income and the income limit for your family size, rounded up to the nearest euro. If you qualify at all you will get the minimum payment of €20 per week.

Form FIS1: http://www.welfare.ie/en/pdf/fis1.pdf

If you think you have been wrongly refused FIS you can appeal this decision, and please do. In many cases a lot will just walk from the hassle, pursue your rights.

Please Note They Are Other allowances for low earners:
Apply for medical card online or by post: http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/list/1/schemes/mc/apply/

Child Benefit: Budget 2015
It was announced in Budget 2015 that the rate of Child Benefit will increase by €5 to €135 per month for each child from January 2015
Claim for your new baby: https://www.welfare.ie/en/pages/secure/eforms.aspx

Workers can claim rent tax credit: Who can Claim?
An individual, paying for private rented accommodation used as a sole or main residence. This includes rent paid for flats, apartments or houses. The tax credit for the years 2011 onwards applies to individuals who were renting a property on 7 December 2010. This tax credit will cease in 2017.
Form http://www.revenue.ie/en/tax/it/forms/rent1.pdf

Rent Supplement: (for those on welfare only)
http://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/rent_faq.aspx#q2

Back TO FIS:
Complete application form FIS 1 (available on http://www.welfare.ie or at any local Social Welfare Office) and submit the following documents with it, if available:
your most recent payslip to show your income and hours of employment
your latest P60 (if you have one) and
your Certificate of Tax Credits for the current year (if you have one).
Even if you do not have these documents when you fill in the application form, send us the form straight away. You can send the documents or certificates as soon as you have them.
Send your application to: Family Income Supplement Section, Social Welfare Services, Government Buildings, Ballinalee Road, Longford

Example 3:
Single Parent, 1 child, recently commenced working 25 hours per week as a secretary
Gross taxable earnings to date €360.00
Total tax deducted €0.00
Employee PRSI €14.40
Total USC €10.54
Net assessable earnings €335.06
Number of weeks worked 1
Average weekly earnings €335.06
Other Income €0.00
Total family income €335.06
Income limit (1 Child) €506.00
Difference between income limit and earnings €170.94
FIS Payable (60% of difference rounded) €103.00

Married parent, 4 children working 41 hours per week as a manager
Gross taxable earnings 2012 €45,876.00
Total tax deducted €8,621.50
Employee PRSI €439.75
Total USC €2,833.68
Net assessable earnings €33,981.07
Number of weeks worked 52
Average weekly earnings €653.48
Other Income €0.00
Total family income €653.48
Income limit (4 Children) €824.00
Difference between income limit and earnings €170.52
FIS Payable (60% of difference rounded ) €103.00

Sample Text:
Family Income Supplement (FIS) is a weekly tax-free payment available to employees with children. It gives extra financial support to people on low pay. You cannot qualify for FIS if you are only self-employed – you must be an employee to qualify.

You must have at least one child who normally lives with you or is financially supported by you. Your child must be under 18 years of age or between 18 and 22 years of age and in full-time education.

To qualify for FIS, your average weekly family income must be below a certain amount for your family size. The FIS you receive is 60% of the difference between your average weekly family income and the income limit which applies to your family. For more information about average family income see ‘Rates’ below.

Your FIS payment is not taxed. If you are getting FIS you may also be entitled to the Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance. Your income from FIS is not taken into account in the assessment for a medical card.

The new Back to Work Family Dividend (BTWFD) and FIS can be paid together and the BTWFD will not be taken into account in the means test for FIS.

FIS is a tax-free weekly payment for employees:

•Working 19 or more hours per week (or 38 or more hours per fortnight). You can combine the weekly hours you have worked with your spouse, civil partner, cohabitant’s hours to meet this condition. You cannot use time spent in self-employment (or on Community Employment, Gateway, Tús, JobBridge or the Rural Social Scheme) to meet this condition.
•Where the employment is likely to last at least 3 months
•Looking after one or more children and
•Earning less than a set amount which varies according to family size

Under EU regulations you may be able to claim FIS if your children are living abroad and dependent on you. Generally the payment continues for one year (52 weeks) and is not affected by, for example, an increase or a decrease in earnings.

However, in the following 2 circumstances, your weekly rate of FIS can be revised during the year:
•If you start to care for an additional child your FIS rate will increase (because your family size has increased)
•If you were getting a One-Parent Family Payment and your payment stopped because your youngest child reached the relevant age limit your FIS rate can be revised to take account of the loss of your OFP

If you lose your job or have reduced working hours

If your pay from work is reduced your Family Income Supplement (FIS) payment will stay the same. It will not increase. However, when your FIS payment ends you can re-apply giving details of your new reduced income. (FIS is usually paid for 52 weeks. At the end of the 52 weeks, you can re-apply for FIS.)

If the number of hours you work each week is reduced to below 19 hours (38 hours per fortnight) you are no longer entitled to FIS. You should notify the FIS section if your hours fall below the minimum requirement.

If you lose your job you are no longer entitled to FIS. You must notify the FIS section.

Getting FIS with other social welfare payments

You cannot get FIS if you are on one of the following schemes or social welfare payments:

•Community Employment Scheme, Gateway, Rural Social Scheme, the Tús scheme or JobBridge.
•Jobseeker’s Benefit, Jobseeker’s Allowance or Farm Assist
•State Pension (Transition) or Pre-Retirement Allowance

Your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant can claim FIS while you are getting one of these payments. However an Increase for a Qualified Adult (IQA) will no longer be paid and your social welfare payment will be assessed as income for their FIS payment. Any Increase for a Qualified Child will be affected. Similarly if your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant is getting one of these payments, you can qualify for FIS but an IQA will no longer be paid for you.

If you are parenting alone you may be entitled to FIS in addition to your One-Parent Family Payment, Deserted Wife’s Benefit or Widow’s, Widower’s or Surviving Civil Partner’s (Contributory) Pension.

You can get FIS while you are taking part in the Part-Time Job Incentive Scheme.

You can get Illness Benefit while you are getting FIS (for 6 consecutive weeks). If you are out of work for more than 6 consecutive weeks payment of FIS is suspended until you return to work and send a final certificate into the Illness Benefit section or until your FIS award period expires (whichever is the earlier).

Under the Maternity Protection Act 1994, a woman who qualifies for Maternity Benefit, Adoptive Benefit or Health and Safety Benefit is entitled to claim FIS (provided she meets the conditions of the FIS payment and has a family – a pregnant woman who has no other children does not qualify for FIS until the birth of the baby).

Your income must be less than the income limit for your family size. (If you are claiming Maternity Benefit your average weekly earnings are worked out using your gross earnings to date or your P60). Your FIS claim will then be paid for one year from the start of your Maternity Benefit payment (if you have a child already) or from the birth of your baby if it is your first baby.

You are not entitled to continue to claim FIS if you take additional unpaid maternity or adoptive leave, if you do not return to work following maternity or adoptive leave or if you lose your job after returning to work.

Maintenance
A separated parent can apply for FIS once he or she meets the qualifying conditions and

• Is living with the children or

• Is wholly maintaining the ex-spouse, ex-civil partner or ex-cohabitant with whom the children are living

Wholly maintaining means that maintenance paid by you, the FIS applicant, must be the sole income of your ex-spouse, ex-civil partner or ex-cohabitant.

Only one FIS payment can be made for a family

Paying maintenance
If you are a separated parent and paying maintenance you may qualify for FIS. To qualify you must be wholly maintaining the parent with whom the children are living. Only one FIS payment can be made for a family, the parent to whom you are paying maintenance must not be getting FIS.

If you are paying maintenance as a result of a court order or legally binding agreement for a second family, the amount of that maintenance payment will not be deducted from the income to be assessed for FIS.

Getting maintenance
If you are getting maintenance, your total maintenance payment will be assessed as income for FIS. Only one FIS payment can be made for a family. This means that the parent from whom you are getting maintenance must not be getting FIS.

A parent getting maintenance for a qualified child will also have that maintenance assessed for FIS.

Rates

FIS is calculated on the basis of 60% of the difference between the income limit for the family size and the assessable income of the person(s) raising the child(ren). The combined income of a couple (married, in a civil partnership or cohabiting) is taken into account.

Income from any source (excluding the disregards stated below) is assessed as means. However, though there are no rules excluding the assessment of capital, the Department of Social Protection generally does not assess capital or examine your bank account details when you apply for FIS.

The main items counted as income are:

•Your assessable earnings and your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant’s assessable earnings. (Assessable earnings are gross pay minus tax, employee PRSI, Universal Social Charge and superannuation (including the Public Service Pension Levy.) Income from working as a home help is included.
•Any extra income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant have from employment (such as pay for overtime, bonuses, allowances or commission).
•Any income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant may have from self-employment.
•Income from occupational pensions.
•Income you or your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant may have including social welfare payments.
•All family income from carer’s payments (Carer’s Allowance or Carer’s Benefit).
•Rental income from the letting of property or land (the capital value is not assessed). The gross rental income is assessed and you cannot deduct mortgage payments or other expenses.

The following payments do not count as family income:

•Child Benefit
•Guardian’s payments
•Supplementary Welfare Allowance
•Domiciliary Care Allowance
•Foster Child Allowance
•Rent Allowance for tenants affected by the de-control of rents
•Income from a charitable organisation
•Income from providing accommodation to students studying Irish in Gaeltacht areas under a scheme administered by the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

Calculating income for FIS

The Department of Social Protection calculates your assessable income and your average income over a certain period of time.

If you are newly in employment, your average weekly income is calculated from when you started work. If you have been working for over a year, your average weekly income are calculated from your latest P60. Your P60 is also used to calculate your average weekly income when your claim is being renewed.

If your spouse, civil partner or cohabitant is self-employed, his or her income over the 12-month period before you lodge your claim is used to work out his or her average weekly income.

Again, to qualify, your average weekly family income must be below a certain amount for your family size. You can read examples of calculations on welfare.ie.

FIS income limits in 2015 (fact)

If you have: And your weekly family income is less than:

One child €506
Two children €602
Three children €703
Four children €824
Five children €950
Six children €1,066
Seven children €1,202
Eight children €1,298

It’s important to be aware, that no matter how little you may qualify for, you will still get a minimum of €20 each week. You can use the Benefit of Work Ready Reckoner from the Department of Social Protection to help you assess out the financial consequences of taking up full-time work.

The Reckoner works out the total amount you would receive on taking up full-time work (including any Family Income Supplement) and compares this to what you are getting in jobseeker payments (including Rent Supplement).

If you are getting FIS you may also be entitled to the Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance.

How to apply

To apply fill in an application form for Family Income Supplement (pdf). You can get a copy of this form in your Intreo centre or social welfare local office. If you need help to fill in this form, the staff in your social welfare local office or Citizens Information Centre can help you.

To make sure that your application for FIS is processed as quickly as possible, you should include your latest P60 form, 2 recent payslips, and a copy of your Certificate of Tax Credits for the current tax year with your application.

If you think you have been wrongly refused FIS you can appeal this decision.

Where to apply

Send your completed Family Income Supplement application form to:

Family Income Supplement (FIS) Section

Department of Social Protection
Social Welfare Services Office
Government Buildings
Ballinalee Road
Longford
Ireland

Tel:(043) 334 0053
Locall:1890 92 77 70
Email: fissection@welfare.ie

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