Adonis Diaries

Archive for June 18th, 2018

Dyslexic? Richard Branson
Actually, scores of famous and glamorous people are dyslexic.
incredible story! Richard Branson… this is how creativity comes about!
In 1966, a dyslexic sixteen–year–old boy dropped out of school and he definitely got his money’s worth!
How many of us have had flights cancelled and considered it the end of the world at times?
Richard Branson opted for a more creative solution! Take a look at how his mind works!
“I was in my late twenties, so I had a business, but nobody knew who I was at the time. I was headed to the Virgin Islands and I had a very pretty girl waiting for me, so I was — umm — determined to get there on time.
At the airport, my final flight to the Virgin Islands was cancelled because of maintenance or something. It was the last flight out that night.
I thought this was ridiculous, so I went and chartered a private airplane to take me to the Virgin Islands, which I did not have the money to do.
Then, I picked up a small blackboard, wrote “Virgin Airlines. $29.” on it, and went over to the group of people who had been on the flight that was cancelled.
I sold tickets for the rest of the seats on the charter plane, used their money to pay for the plane, and we all went to the Virgin Islands that night.”
For the full article: http://buff.ly/13dPGY9 And here’s his video, Life at 30,000 feet on TED: http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_branson_s_life_at_30_000_feet.html

Nature and nurture (professional edition)

The boss, conference organizer, co-worker, interviewer, parent or client who wants your best work, your art and your genuine enthusiasm:

Can demand that you bring your best possible work the first time,

can point out that they are paying you well, that they’re busy, that they’re powerful, and that they accept nothing short of high performance or you’re out.

Or they can nurture you, encourage you, set a high bar and then support you on your way.

They can teach you, cajole you and introduce you to others that will do the same.

The first strategy is the factory mindset, of interchangeable parts and interchangeable people. It is the strategy of ensuring 6 sigma perfection, on demand, and the strategy of someone in power, who can demand what he wants, when he wants it.

You don’t make art this way, or emotional connections, or things that haven’t been made before.

You may get the job done, but it’s not clear if you’ll make a difference.

Posted by Seth Godin on July 09, 2013

The future is messy

and the past is neat.

It’s always like that.

That’s because the people who chronicle the past are busy connecting the dots, editing what we remember and presenting a neat, coherent arc.

We can publish the history of Roman Empire in 500 pages, but we’d need 10 times that to contain a narrative of the noise in your head over the last hour.

Even viral videos are easy to describe after they happen.

But if these experts are so smart, how come they can never predict the next one?

Posted by Seth Godin on July 24, 2013

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The Guy Quote – Bertrand Russell

Posted on June 21, 2011 in Dysonology

“Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind.”

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872 – 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, and social critic. He was born in Wales, into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in Britain.

His work has had a considerable influence on logic, mathematics, set theory, linguistics, computer science, and philosophy, especially philosophy of language, epistemology, and metaphysics.

At various points in his life, he imagined himself: he turned a liberal, a socialist, and a pacifist, but he also admitted that he had never been any of these things, in any profound sense.

Russell led the British “revolt against idealism” in the early 1900s. He is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege and his protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein, and is widely held to be one of the 20th century’s premier logicians.

He co-authored, with A. N. Whitehead, Principia Mathematica, an attempt to ground mathematics on logic.

His philosophical essay “On Denoting” has been considered a “paradigm of philosophy.”

Russell was a prominent anti-war activist; he championed free trade and anti-imperialism.

Russell went to prison for his pacifism during World War I. Later, he campaigned against Adolf Hitler, then criticised Stalinist totalitarianism, attacked the United States of America’s involvement in the Vietnam War, and was an outspoken proponent of nuclear disarmament.

One of his last acts was to issue a statement which condemned Israeli aggression in the Middle East.

In 1950, Russell was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, “in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought.” (this edited from and more on him at Wikipedia – there’s also a good bio of him and foray into some of his thought in the Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy)

Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.

Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education.

To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already 3-parts dead.

I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong.

Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.

If a man is offered a fact which goes against his instincts, he will scrutinize it closely, and unless the evidence is overwhelming, he will refuse to believe it.

If, on the other hand, he is offered something which affords a reason for acting in accordance to his instincts, he will accept it even on the slightest evidence.

The origin of myths is explained in this way. The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser men so full of doubts.

The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

War doesn’t decide who is right, war decides who is left. (Mostly crippled, physically, emotionally and mentally)

In all affairs it’s a healthy thing now and then to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted.

In the part of this universe that we know there is great injustice, and often the good suffer, and often the wicked prosper, and one hardly knows which of those is the more annoying.

It’s easy to fall in love. The hard part is finding someone to catch you. (These extended hands are hardly found without some kind of chemistry?)

It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this. (No evidence will ever be forthcoming: we are governed by emotions)

It is a waste of energy to be angry with a man who behaves badly, just as it is to be angry with a car that won’t go.

Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim.

Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth — more than ruin — more even than death…. Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit.

Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid.

Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.

No one gossips about other people’s secret virtues.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it makes a better soup.

Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man.

If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes.

But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense.

If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.

To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness

Passive acceptance of the teacher’s wisdom is easy to most boys and girls. It involves no effort of independent thought, and seems rational because the teacher knows more than his pupils; it is moreover the way to win the favour of the teacher unless he is a very exceptional man.

Yet the habit of passive acceptance is a disastrous one in later life. It causes man to seek and to accept a leader, and to accept as a leader whoever is established in that position.

One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important.

Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

Patriots always talk of dying for their country but never of killing for their country.

There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it.

The hardest thing to learn in life is which bridge to cross and which to burn.

As a philosopher, if I were speaking to a purely philosophic audience I should say that I ought to describe myself as an Agnostic, because I do not think that there is a conclusive argument by which one can prove that there is Not a God.

On the other hand, if I am to convey the right impression to the ordinary man in the street I think that I ought to say that I am an Atheist, because, when I say that I cannot prove that there is Not a God, I ought to add equally that I cannot prove that there are not the Homeric gods.

So far as I can remember, there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence. (Meaning of a good reflective mind?)

There is much pleasure to be gained from useless knowledge.

Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom.

One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways.

The good life, as I conceive it, is a happy life. I do not mean that if you are good you will be happy – I mean that if you are happy you will be good.

The main things which seem to me important on their own account, and not merely as means to other things, are knowledge, art, instinctive happiness, and relations of friendship or affection.


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