Adonis Diaries

Archive for the ‘education methods/programs’ Category

The top 10 skills employers look for in job applicants

Friday, 1 September 2017

Tools such as Google Maps and Citymapper have made navigating around the world simple. It’s a shame the same cannot be said for navigating the labour market.

The need for a skills map is growing.

Recent research forecasts that around 35% of current jobs in the UK are at high risk of computerisation over the next 20 years.

To stay ahead of automation, workers will need to become lifelong learners. But to do so, they must be able to identify relevant new skills

We believe that online job adverts could act as the database for an automated skills map. To test that idea, we have built a basic prototype Skills Map using millions of job adverts provided by Burning Glass.

The dataset contains over 11,000 unique skills and software programs. These skills are mapped to occupations which allow us to build up a detailed picture of the latest skills required in a range of occupations, and identify the key changes in skill demands over time.

The data are not without errors and there are still several hurdles to overcome before the UK could have a fully automated skills map driven by job adverts.

But if you’re currently applying for jobs, it still might be worth giving a thought to our lists, and trying the tool.

The top 10 skills for employers in 2014 to 2016

Many of the most common terms in job adverts relate to inter-personal skills, such as customer service and teamwork. Basic competencies, such as writing and problem solving, also feature in the list.

  1. Communication skills
  2. Organisational skills
  3. Planning
  4. Customer service
  5. Microsoft Excel
  6. Business management
  7. Teamwork/collaboration
  8. Writing
  9. Detail-orientated
  10. Sales

Which 10 skills are now mentioned more frequently?

These skills have shown the fastest growth in the number of mentions between 2012-14 and 2014-16.

Several factors can drive growth, including an increase in the number of vacancies for the job that requires this skill, or an increase in the range of jobs that use this skill.

A number of these skills (looking at the top 100) relate to caring for others, such as patient care, mental health, and working with patients who have dementia.

A second group of skills reflect the opportunities and threats that come from living in a more connected world. These include digital marketing, big data, social media, information security and firewalls.

  1. Big data
  2. Information technology industry experience
  3. Contract accountancy
  4. On-boarding
  5. Digital marketing
  6. Information security
  7. Transportation logistics
  8. Front-end development
  9. Patient care
  10. Mental health

Which 10 skills are now mentioned less often?

These skills have experienced the slowest growth, or largest falls, between 2012-14 and 2014-16.

The appearance of ‘basic internet skills’ may seem counterintuitive in an ever more digitised world. It appears because more employers are now taking this skill for granted and no longer need to mention it in job adverts.

Other skills appear because employers no longer require the skill or because they are now using a different word to describe that skill.

Looking beyond the top 10, a number of skill groups emerge. One group of declining skills relates to consumer finance, such as financial planning and mortgage advice.

A second group centres around working with industrial machinery, such as computer numerical control.

A third group relates to logistics and

A final group contains skills that rely on the telephone, such as cold calling.

  1. Warehouse management
  2. Basic internet skills
  3. Materials design
  4. Mechanical design
  5. Advertising sales
  6. Insurance underwriting
  7. Retail sales
  8. Teaching English
  9. Computer Numerical Control (CNC)
  10. Derivatives (What’s that means? In financial jargon?)
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28 Boring Words Alternatives – Improve Your Writing

Jack Milgram sent this link

You’re having a conversation with your friend or colleague. Once it’s over and couple of minutes pass, thoughts appear in your head.

You start thinking: “I should’ve said that differently. Using other words would be better.”

And it doesn’t even matter, whether the conversation was friendly, or if it was an argument of some sort. It can happen even after a small talk.

At Custom-Writing, we care about how you present yourself even in a shortest talk. We also don’t want you to be doubting your conversation skills.

That’s why we’ve gathered 28 the most common words that are just too boring to use. And we’ve selected a number of alternatives you can use to make your speech way more varied and exciting.

It’s going to be equally helpful both for spoken and for written conversations.

You can find all of this goodness in an info-graphic below.

We’re not saying that you should get rid of those boring words altogether. But changing things up a little bit will make a big difference.

And again, you won’t ever have to worry about whether or not you’ve made a good impression in that last conversation.

However, English has much more to offer. It’s just became a habit to use the most common words, as it doesn’t require additional thinking.

But if the language allows you to express you thoughts in so many different ways, why would you miss this opportunity?

All you need is just a little bit of attention and patience. After some time, you won’t even notice that you’ve upgraded your active vocabulary.

Note: I would suggest another info-graphic for words that need to be dropped from these info-graphic that are being overused in writing.

This impossible mission of raising a baby to adulthood

It is impossible for me to contemplate that a baby can be raised to adulthood.

It is done every second around the world, and more frequently in impoverished States with scores of babies for each couple.

The fact that many human babies got to live passed 5 years blow my mind

Sure, it is the grand parents, mainly grand-mothers who sustain this impossible mission, when still around and the couple is close by.

What about couples who decided to start their journey far away from their original community? What about the single family, single for many reasons, individual, civil war, natural calamities, collateral damage…?

What of father working overseas in “greener pastures” in order to sent some money to the toiling mother, and barely visiting the family, except to making the mother pregnant again?

Can we call him a “father”? How about an employee, in public or private institutions, hired to maintain the procreation process, but never playing any role is raising the babies?

Has any father ever spent an entire week, just to observe and participate fully in taking care of the babies? An entire week totally focused in the upbringing of the children?

It is impossible to raise babies to adulthood.

It is far easier to believe in the existence of an abstract God: it does Not engage sustained frustration and labor.

Just believing of the possible of raising babies is beyond my mental and emotional capabilities: it is too rough, too down to earth, to irrational to contemplate.

This every second task of maintaining and sustaining a baby’s life.

The other impossible fact of life is how an adult person manages to get so upset with his parents that he leave them and never show up for years.

Worst, this impossible word to utter “Thank you for raising me

This “adult person” must be totally brainless Not to appreciate what it took to raise him to adulthood. And give him a chance to live his life.

It used to be the community responsibility to raising kids, by varied forma of organization and sets of values and myths.

And you find organizations coming down on women and girls contemplating to abort. Those girls who had to participate in raising younger siblings, this impossible foul mission that all eau de cologne will never get rid of its stench for a lifetime

Who is raising the kids nowadays? Schools for part of the day, but for the remaining of the day and night?

Mothers are No fools. It is Not the occasional stupid smile of the baby that can substitute to the toil of every second.

Boobs, where are the boobs cries the baby.

That’s all that count for the baby. And the other members and relatives can live their illusions that the mother is fulfilled and in a state of grace

How mother manages to recharge enough when given a few minutes of reprieve? That’s the main question that biologists have to focus their research upon.

 

 

 

Sloppy science

We can measure it.

For decades, every single year, scientists have visited the Galapagos and measured the beaks of a particular species of finch.

And year after year, with each generation, the beaks change, exactly as we’d expect from the weather patterns of the year before. Evolutionary biology works, and rigorous data collection backs it up.

For hundreds of years, though, science has gotten it wrong about gender, race and ethnicity. Eugenics and its brethren sound simple, but often lead to tragic outcomes.

The sloppy scientist says, “on average, across populations, left to its own devices, this group is [not as skilled] [neurotic] [hard to work with] [not as smart] [not as strong] [slower]” etc. They make assumptions without sufficient data, and the rigor is missing.

The first problem is that human beings aren’t averages, they’re individuals. (They can be Medians when subdivided into a dozen of categories?)

And the bigger problem is that we’re never left to our own devices. We are creatures of culture.

The math that we can do on populations of hedgehogs or pigeons doesn’t apply to people, because people build and change and experience culture differently than any other species.

Your DNA is virtually identical to that of the hordes that accompanied Ghengis Khan, as well as most Cro-Magnon cavemen–pass one on the street and you wouldn’t be able to tell that he’s different from you. The reason you don’t act the way they did is completely the result of culture, not genes.

It’s culture that pushes us to level up, to dig deeper, to do things that we might not otherwise do.

It’s culture that finds and encourages and pushes people to become better versions of themselves than anyone else expected to find.

So it was sloppy/lazy/fearful science that said that women couldn’t handle being doctors.

And it was sloppy science that worked to limit the number of Asian, Jewish, Near-Easterns or African students at various institutions.

And it’s sloppy science that’s been used against black people for hundreds of years.

And sloppy science said that a 4 minute mile was impossible and that a woman could never finish a marathon.

Sloppy because it doesn’t include all the relevant factors. (It is almost impossible to interpret results with even 6 factors and their many interrelations and intersections)

There’s nothing wrong with the scientific method, but everything is wrong with using it poorly (and often intentionally).

What we need are caring human beings who will choose to change the culture for the better.

Not all of it, of course. Merely the culture they can touch. The people they can engage with. The human beings they can look in the eye, offer to help, offer encouragement and offer a hand up.

Once we reset the standard, it becomes the new normal, and suddenly, the sloppy science seems like phrenology. Because culture is up to us.

Sloppy science isn’t science at all.

It’s the lazy or wrongheaded use of the scientific method part of the time, mixing in fear for good measure.

Ignoring culture ignores the part that truly matters.

It’s tempting to judge people by their DNA. It makes a lot more sense, though, to see people based on what they can contribute instead.

Am I a professional? Am I a generalist scholar? Who am I?

Do you think if you feel fully cognizant of the array of your emotions or your lack of talents (passions) in many aspects of the living that you are set for a boring death?

This post is based on facts that you can gleam in transcripts and documents…

With 14 years of university study, a PhD in Industrial/Human Factors, a couple of Masters in Operations research, physics and chemistry.

With taking many graduate courses in psychology, marketing, accounting,economy, higher education…

Can I consider myself a professional?

I still cannot claim this title: I didn’t work for a company for any substantial duration and just taught a few courses at universities.

Reading 3 hours per day at libraries, taking notes, reviewing books, writing posts and articles (about 7,300 articles on my blog in 45 categories), and keeping track of the political systems in countless countries, human rights performance, ecology…

Can I consider myself a professional?

At least, I should come to term that I am a generalist scholar

By mastering 3 languages, English French and Arabic (reading, speaking and writing), I’ll be a fool to deny myself knowledge of 3 cultures and civilizations

Most of all, I have an experimental mind and read and comprehend scientific papers in many fields and can evaluate the extent of their research or scientific validity.

I had to learn and get trained on various types of designing and conducting experiments with objects and subjects in many fields (engineering, psychology, marketing) and I am familiar with the particular statistical analysis packages that each of these fields feel comfortable applying and interpreting results. (That was some time ago)

Can I consider myself a professional?

And yet, I cannot claim to be a professional in the restrictive sense that hiring companies evaluate that term.

At least, I should come to term that I am a generalist scholar

I discovered that “professionalism” makes me physically sick, sustained stomach aches and recurring periods of catching cold… I would have died early on.

I am enjoying this freedom of expressing my opinions and feelings, and taking positions as a free man: Frequent confrontation with bullying people and the powers flaunting my rights and human rights

I don’t miss “professionalism”, excepting the retirement money

 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Your Body is ACIDIC.

Very SIMPLE WAYS TO ALKALIZE YOUR BODY–

Many people who are reading this may have a high acidity level in his or her body. This is due to the typical first world diet of processed foods, refined sugars, and GMOs.

However, many people do not know that an acidic body is a breeding ground for cancer, excess weight, pain and many health issues.

Fortunately, making your organism more alkaline is very simple and easy. Making alkaline environment is in fact the opposite of acidic environment.

Here are 10 simple natural ways that you can practice every day and they will alkalize your organism. At same time you will gain more everyday energy and vitality:

1. The most important thing is to start your day with smile and with a large glass of water with the juice of a freshly-squeezed lemon. Lemons actually have the opposite effect on your body even they may seem acidic. Drink first thing in the morning to flush the system.

Another option is to drink one or two glasses of organic apple cider vinegar and water daily. You should only mix one to two tablespoons of vinegar in eight ounces of water.

2. Eat large portion of green salad tossed in lemon juice and quality olive oil. Greens (vegetable or fruit) are among the best sources of alkaline minerals, like calcium. Eat alkaline foods during the day like most fruits and vegetables. They sustain the body’s pH on a daily basis and keep balance in your organism.
3. Your snack should consist on raw, unsalted almonds. Almonds are full with minerals that are natural alkaline like magnesium and calcium, which actually help to balance out acidity and in the same time to balance blood sugar.
4. Drink almond milk and make yourself nice berry smoothie with added green powder like spirulina, or other greens. If you have choice between almond milk and cow’s milk, almond milk is better option.
5. Go for a nice walk or some other exercise. It’s very important to be active. Exercise actually helps move acidic products so your body can better eliminate them.
6. Breathe deeply. Ideally, choose a spot that has fresh, oxygen-rich air and go there whenever you can. While you are there, drink lots of water (and on daily basis as well) to flush the system of waste.
7. Do not eat meat every day. If you can skip few days without meat it will be great because eating meat every day leaves an acid residue behind. We have a lot of vegan or vegetarian recipes for you. Alkalize your body!
8. Skip dessert loaded with sugar and skip drinking soda. Sugar is one of the worst acidic foods we consume and our enemy. If you drink just ONE can of soda, you will actually need more than thirty glasses of neutral water to neutralize the acidity in your body!
9. Add more vegetables to your diet. Be careful, potatoes don’t count. However, sweet potatoes are good choice but don’t make them with butter, use olive oil and Himalayan salt for baking. Peppers, Asparagus, squash, Aubergines, and other vegetables are also great choices.
10. And last but not least: Add more sprouts to your daily diet. They are extremely alkalizing and rich in nutrients and energy-boosting enzymes.

Psychologists recommend children be bored in the summer

Olivia Goldhill. June 11, 2016

Do you entertain your kids with chess camp, art school, cooking classes, or tennis lessons during the unstructured summer months? Or perhaps all of them?

There are activities and summer camps galore to fill children’s time and supply much needed childcare when kids are out of school. But psychologists and child development experts suggest that over-scheduling children during the summer is unnecessary and could ultimately keep kids from from discovering what truly interests them.

“Your role as a parent is to prepare children to take their place in society. Being an adult means occupying yourself and filling up your leisure time in a way that will make you happy,” says Lyn Fry, a child psychologist in London with a focus on education. “If parents spend all their time filling up their child’s spare time, then the child’s never going to learn to do this for themselves.”

Fry is not the only one to point out the benefits of boredom. Dr. Teresa Belton, visiting fellow at the University of East Anglia with a focus on the connection between boredom and imagination, told the BBC that boredom is crucial for developing “internal stimulus,” which then allows true creativity.

And though our capacity for boredom may well have diminished with all the attractions of the internet, experts have been discussing the importance of doing nothing for decades.

In 1993, psychoanalyst Adam Phillips wrote that the “capacity to be bored can be a developmental achievement for the child.” Boredom is a chance to contemplate life, rather than rushing through it, he said in his book On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life. “It is one of the most oppressive demands of adults that the child should be interested, rather than take time to find what interests him. Boredom is integral to the process of taking one’s time,” added Phillips.

Fry suggests that at the the start of the summer, parents sit down with their kids—at least those above the age of four—and collectively write down a list of everything their children might enjoy doing during their break. These can be basic activities, such as playing cards, reading a book, or going for a bicycle ride. They could also be more elaborate ideas such as cooking a fancy dinner, putting on a play, or practicing photography.

Then, if your child comes to you throughout the summer complaining of boredom, tell them to go and look at the list.

“It puts the onus on them to say, ‘This is what I’d like to do’,” says Fry.

While there’s a good chance children might mope around for a while and be bored, it’s important to realize that this isn’t wasted time.

“There’s no problem with being bored,” says Fry. “It’s not a sin, is it? I think children need to learn how to be bored in order to motivate themselves to get things done. Being bored is a way to make children self-reliant.”

This same theory was put forward in 1930 by philosopher Bertrand Russell, who devoted a chapter of his book The Conquest of Happinessto the potential value of boredom. Imagination and capacity to cope with boredom must be learnt as a child, he wrote:

“A child develops best when, like a young plant, he is left undisturbed in the same soil. Too much travel, too much variety of impressions, are not good for the young, and cause them as they grow up to become incapable of enduring fruitful monotony.”


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adonis49

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