Adonis Diaries

Archive for the ‘genocide’ Category

Churchill Sent 2 Million Russian Refugees to Certain Death at End of WWII

‘They were certain that they would be killed or, at the very least, sentenced to the unspeakable horrors of the labor camps’.

Advertisements
Rohingya women face violence, rape by Myanmar troops
50% of refugees to Bangladesh are children
By Shweta Bajaj. 2017-11-18

Rohingya women and girls have faced brutalities, rape and violence at the hands of the Myanmar army as part of a campaign of ethnic cleansing, Human Rights Watch said on Thursday in a report.

Three days prior, on Monday, Myanmar’s army released a report denying any allegations of rape and violence by the security forces. However, the women in the refugee camps tell stories of gang rapes, assaults and unimaginable violence.

Rohingya camps are full of young women. According to some estimates, the female refugee population is over 50 percent, with many young men being killed in Myanmar, leaving many women widowed.

Sahera Khatun, 18, is in the final month of her pregnancy. She said, in August, when she was six months pregnant, she was raped by the Myanmar military in the same room as other girls.

Soldiers entered and shut the door. They first took our ornaments and then raped us. We shouted for a very long time and then girls from our neighborhood came out to save us and then the military fled,” she said.

The rape left her seriously injured. She wasn’t sure if her child was still alive. Her husband and his friend carried her on a stretcher made of bamboo for 13 days to reach Bangladesh from Myanmar.

“We cannot even fathom the horrors,” Khatun said,

New refugees wait for a space to be allocated in the camp. /CGTN Photo

A clinic run by a local Bangladeshi NGO in a refugee camp has just opened. But the doctor here has a tough task; the queue is long, mostly women.

A patient enters and says she was beaten up by the military – her story is not rare.

There are many like her and women face acute health issues. Over the past few months, they’ve witnessed horrors and suffered physical abuse.

“They are living in unhygienic conditions, taking not enough nutrients,” said Sushant Maula Chowdhury, senior medical officer.

“Their psychological and social [conditions] there is very big imbalance and when there is some heart problem with the mental side, the body also follows it.”

Dr. Sushant Maula Chowdhury sees a patient. /CGTN Photo

Nuree Begum, 55, lost all her family members in the chaos of the violence – her husband, children and grandchildren.

She walked through forests and swam through a river to reach Bangladesh three months ago and has given up hope of finding them.

“Military was coming from all sides,” Begum said, “and there was noise of shooting and bombing.”

A doctor who saw Begum said she is a classic case of depression, but she’s not alone. She and thousands of other women are suffering from depression and have no will to live.

But for these women, who have lived through injustices, reports and governments are neither important nor relevant.

A look at them makes it clear that recovery for the Rohingya women is a distant dream, and being alive is a miracle.

Note: Just heard that China is stepping in to find a resolution to that human catastrophe. Hoping China will step in in Yemen too

Post-Holocaust trauma? Extending to fourth generation?

Naomi Wolf posted on FB this July 27, 2014

A lot of our reactions emerge out of post-Holocaust trauma.

(Of any trauma, period. I read a genetic paper that many traces of trauma of grand parents are inherited by the next generations. The all kinds of trauma experienced by Palestinians will last a long time: All these forced transfers, the body destroyed in any second, houses demolished, the waiting and indignities at every check point, the administrative detention that last months…)

It does not mean they are right but it explains that when we think Hamas will exterminate us given the chance, it makes peace impossible and leads to the justification of aggression. (Not just Hamas. They claim everyone is after extermination mentality)

Peter Cohen: “This is the problem. Many Jews have an existential connection to the idea of Israel as a refuge against the next holocaust. It is a deeply emotive – not rational – need for an imagined safe haven from the threat of persecution by the “Other.” 

(And I say the Palestinian cause is existential. And there will be no peace until the current apartheid practices of “only-Jewish” villages and cities are abolished and all villages shared by Palestinians everywhere in Palestine).

It is a phenomenon ultimately based on fear. And the search for “security” too often at the expense of the Other, leads to the absurdities we are seeing today.

It has become clear to me that, for many Jewish people like Aaron, the issue of a Jewish State is non-negotiable.

It is value they place above virtually all else, including the sanctity of life.

Now that the realization of this dream has caused so much wrong and suffering, it is time to reexamine this value and ask ourselves if it is really even necessary to – or compatible with – the making of a better world.”

Note: Last week, Naomi walked out of the synagogue because she was saddened of the lack of any mention of Gaza (‘where is God if not in caring for others?’ she asked…She looks into her book in an attempt to understand and grasp it all, below is what she shares.

I was challenged below: “Read the Bible! God gave the land of Israel to the Jewish people.”

I may get crucified for this but I have started to say it — most recently (terrified, trembling) to warm welcome in a synagogue in LA: Actually if you read Genesis Exodus and Deuteronomy in Hebrew — as I do — you see that God did not “give” Israel to the Jews/Israelites.

We as Jews are raised with the creed that “God gave us the land of Israel” in Genesis — and that ethnically ‘we are the chosen people.”

I could not believe my eyes when I saw this, I checked my reading with major scholars and they confirmed it — actually God’s “covenant” in Genesis, Exodus and Deuteronomy with the Jewish people is NOT ABOUT AN ETHNICITY AND NOT ABOUT A CONTRACT. IT IS ABOUT A WAY OF BEHAVING.

Again and again in the “covenant” language He never says: “I will give you, ethnic Israelites, the land of Israel.”

Rather He says something far more radical – far more subversive — far more Godlike in my view. 

God says: IF you visit those imprisoned…act mercifully to the widow and the orphan…welcome the stranger in your midst…tend the sick…do justice and love mercy ….and perform various other tasks…THEN YOU WILL BE MY PEOPLE AND THIS LAND WILL BE YOUR LAND.

So “my people” is not ethnic — it is transactional. We are God’s people not by birth but by a way of behaving, that is ethical, kind and just.

And we STOP being “God’s people” when we are not ethical, kind and just. And ANYONE who is ethical, kind and just is, according to God in Genesis, “God’s people.”

And the “contract” to “give” us Israel is conditional — we can live in God’s land IF we are “God’s people” in this way — just, merciful, compassionate. AND — it never ever says, it is ONLY your land.

Even when passages spell out geographical “boundaries” as if God does such a thing, it never says this is exclusively your land. It never says I will give this land JUST to you.

Remember these were homeless nomads who had left slavery in Egypt and were wandering around in the desert. (They never lived in Egypt and were nomadic people who kept away from cities and the sea shore)

At most these passages say, settle here, but they do not say, settle here exclusively.

Indeed again it talks about welcoming “zarim” — translated as “strangers” but can also be translated as “people/tribes who are not you” — in your midst. Blew my mind, hope it blows yours.

Note: It blows my mind when people still refer to Books as spelled out by a God or a messenger of a God.

Which Dictator Killed The Most People?

Note 1:  All dictators, even the most charismatic, are but symbols of a system (dogmatic/ ideological) that the political leaders and society were ripe to adopt.  The silent majority who initially didn’t care, succumbed to the violent and radical minority.

They say that it takes compassion for humanity, love for country and a strong pursuit of justice and mercy, to become a strong and respected leader of the masses.

However, every once in a while, there are politicians or generals who decide to do things their own way. These cold-blooded dictators do not care for the value of life as much as they do for achieving their selfish motives of domination, power and immortality.

This infographic shows worldwide dictators ordered by the number of killings: 1 drop, 1 million dead. (Click the picture for a larger version)

Apparently, Hitler and Stalin combined killed less people that Mao Zedong…

Can you fill in this blank for me?
Adolf Hitler == Holocaust of minorities, gypsies, including Jews. The war brought to execution the racist view of Nazism. Empirial Germany committed and supported genocides before Nazism in their colonies and in Turkey

Lenine: The great famine (1917-22). The western nations at war with Germany blockaded Russia and supported with weapons and mercenaries the Tsarist military that encircled the Soviet rebels on all fronts, except Germany.
Joseph Stalin == Purges, Goulac…before the German invasion
Mao Zedong == Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution (1966-70)
Chiang Kai Check = massacre of communists before Japan occupied China (1933-37)

Young Turk Revolution of 1908: genocide of Christians and Armenians (1915-18)

Japan: massacres in Korea, Manchouria,

Pol Pot of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia: 2 million

George Bush Jr: 1.5 million Iraqis

Rwanda genocide, supported by France

Republican France killed one million Algerian

Belgium killed and maimed 5 millions in its Congo colony for collecting rubber

One commentator said: This graph is just old argument to blame socialism not by ideology but number of dead, those number are taken from books like “The Black Book of Communism” written by obsessed people against communism, over-exaggeration of estimates (there’s no real base for the number)

Note: The USA has proven to have committed the worst crimes against humanity since its inception and continues to be top on the list as the worst White racist system of all times.

It wanted to maintain slave system and took arms against England who had banned it.

It massacred every Indian tribe that resisted expansion.

It slaughtered the Mexicans to rob their lands.

It dropped 2 atomic bombs and frequently exploded atomic bombs in open air

The bodies of the Blacks are still disposable at any second. Blacks live in constant fear of ever ready police forces and white gangs shouting at them for minor excuses

The countless pre-emptive wars around the world have caused mind-boggling atrocities and no one ever was put to trial. At the turn of the century, the US occupied the Philippines, Cuba, Panama, Puerto Rico, and many islands snatched from Spain on the excuse of failing to repaying its debts. All these activities under to guise of encouraging democracy.

It exacted millions of dead in Viet Nam and Korea

Over one million Iraqi civilians died in the 2003 occupation of Iraq. Depleated uranium bombs are still causing babies to be born deformed.

It invited ISIS to move in and occupy Mosul after Iraq refused to extend the presence of US troops in 2013 and after Russia denied US from bombing Syria during Obama.

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/which-dictator-killed-the-most-people/

 

The Land of Stones

When the Wahhabi army, headed by Ibn Saud, entered and occupied cities in the Arabic Peninsula, and Mecca (around 1924), they killed without any discrimination for days: the people praying in mosques, people reading the Coran, the baby  breast feeding… And they trampled all the books and manuscripts that came handy to them.

قاضي مكة يروي فظاعات الوهابيين حين دخلوا مكة .. قال مفتي مكة المكرمة السيد أحمد بن زيني دحلان في كتابه "أمراء البلد الحرام" ص 297 تحت عنوان "ذكر قصة أهل الطائف وما وقع لهم من الوهابية": ولما دخلوا الطائف قتلوا الناس قتلاً عاماً واستوعبوا الكبير والصغير، والمأمور والأمير، والشريف والوضيع، وصاروا يذبحون على صدر الأم الطفل الرضي، وصاروا يصعدون البيوت يخرجون من توارى فيها، فيقتلونهم، فوجدوا جماعة يتدارسون القرآن فقتلوهم عن آخرهم حتى آبادوا من في البيوت جميعاً، ثم خرجوا الى الحوانيت والمساجد وقتلوا من فيها، يقتلون الرجل في المسجد وهو راكع أو ساجد، حتى أفنوا هؤلاء المخلوقات. ويقول السيد إبراهيم الراوي الرفاعي أن عدداً من العلماء قتل في غارات الوهابيين على الحجاز من بينهم السيد عبد الله الزواوي مفتي الشافعية بمكة المكرمة، والشيخ عبد الله أبو الخير قاضي مكة، والشيخ سليمان بن مراد قاضي الطائف، والسيد يوسف الزواوي الذي ناهز الثمانين من العمر والشيخ حسن الشيبي والشيخ جعفر الشيبي وغيرهم. وارتكبت القوات الوهابية السعودية مجازر جماعية في دقاق اللوز ووادي وج ونهبوا النقود والعروض والأساس والفراش أما الكتب (فإنهم نشروها في تلك البطاح وفي الأزقة والأسواق تعصف بها الرياح، وكان فيها من المصاحف والرباع ألوفاً مؤلّفة ومن نسخ البخاري ومسلم وبقية كتب الحديث والفقه والنحو، وغير ذلك من بقية العلوم شيء كثير، ومكثت أياماً يطؤونها بأرجلهم لا يستطيع أحد أن يرفع منها ورقة.
قاضي مكة يروي فظاعات الوهابيين حين دخلوا مكة ..
قال مفتي مكة المكرمة السيد أحمد بن زيني دحلان في كتابه “أمراء البلد الحرام” ص 297 تحت عنوان “ذكر قصة أهل الطائف وما وقع لهم من الوهابية”:
ولما دخلوا الطائف قتلوا الناس قتلاً عاماً واستوعبوا الكبير والصغير، والمأمور والأمير، والشريف والوضيع، وصاروا يذبحون على صدر الأم الطفل الرضي، وصاروا يصعدون البيوت يخرجون من توارى فيها، فيقتلونهم، فوجدوا جماعة يتدارسون القرآن فقتلوهم عن آخرهم حتى آبادوا من في البيوت جميعاً،
ثم خرجوا الى الحوانيت والمساجد وقتلوا من فيها، يقتلون الرجل في المسجد وهو راكع أو ساجد، حتى أفنوا هؤلاء المخلوقات
.
ويقول السيد إبراهيم الراوي الرفاعي أن عدداً من العلماء قتل في غارات الوهابيين على الحجاز من بينهم السيد عبد الله الزواوي مفتي الشافعية بمكة المكرمة، والشيخ عبد الله أبو الخير قاضي مكة، والشيخ سليمان بن مراد قاضي الطائف، والسيد يوسف الزواوي الذي ناهز الثمانين من العمر والشيخ حسن الشيبي والشيخ جعفر الشيبي وغيرهم.
وارتكبت القوات الوهابية السعودية مجازر جماعية في دقاق اللوز ووادي وج ونهبوا النقود والعروض والأساس والفراش أما الكتب (فإنهم نشروها في تلك البطاح وفي الأزقة والأسواق تعصف بها الرياح،
وكان فيها من المصاحف والرباع ألوفاً مؤلّفة ومن نسخ البخاري ومسلم وبقية كتب الحديث والفقه والنحو، وغير ذلك من بقية العلوم شيء كثير، ومكثت أياماً يطؤونها بأرجلهم لا يستطيع أحد أن يرفع منها ورقة.

 

Israel DIME Weapon effect on Gaza-Article and Gallery

JANUARY 18, 2009

What’s DIME ?!

Dense Inert Metal Explosive (DIME) : is an illegal weapon that had been tested in Iraq (Fallujah ) USA , and used in 1996 by Israel , then 2008-2009 again by Israel on Gaza .

Dense Inert Metal Explosive (DIME) : It produces lower pressure but increased impulse in the near field.

Upon detonation of the explosive, the casing disintegrates into extremely small particles, as opposed to the shrapnel which results from the fragmentation of a metal shell casing. (They are irradiated too with “low nuclear” by-products)

Those shrapnel enter the body , which is very lethal at close range ( 4 meters or 13 feet ).

Survivors close to the lethal zone may have their limbs amputated (as the micro shrapnel can slice through soft tissue and bone).

One more Israeli ( IsraHelli Surprise ) :

It’s Carcinogenic , cause the effect of heavy metal tungsten , along with depleted uranium , as USA used before in IRAQ and Afghanistan .

DIME wounds are considered to be untreatable because the metal is delivered in the form of a fine powder which is can’t be removed by surgery .

Is it Legal ?

DIME , is illegal but that’s didn’t hold USA from using it in Iraq and Afghanistan , along with IsraHell ( Israel ) ,  2006 , 2008-2009 .

Question: Since when IsraHell ( Israel ) and USA pay an attention to UN and Legality of their ways ?!

Why Israel is using it over civilians  at Gaza ?

IsraHell is using those kind of weapons not for the first time , they have a long log from using such Illegal weapons on Palestinians , without fear of consequences .

The right answer would be a Genocide , for the Palestinians at Gaza .
If IsraHell ( Israel ) is using those type of illegal weapons to test it , thats immoral .

If Israhell (Israel ) is trying to terrorize Gaza civilians , thats would be the prove anyone can ask for about How IsraHell ( israel ) is terrorist .

If IsraHell ( israel ) is using those type of illegal weapons to cancerize Gaza people , that`s even unethical an immoral .

and , if IsraHell ( israel ) attended to Genocide the Palestinians at Gaza , ( as we all believe now ) , that would be inhuman .

Therefor , we can’t say was what IsraHell hidden goal of using those kind of weapon , so lets by what IsraHell ( israel ) did in Gaza

IsraHell ( israel ) is Inhuman , a Racismic nation , immoral and unethical . and thats how we see it . and thats what gave it ( IsraHell ) the right to do so , that its Illegal country built on blood and dead bodied .

Gaza: Israel under fire for alleged white phosphorus use

Israel uses experimental genotoxic weapon (DIME) against civilians in Gaza

Italian TV Exposes Experimental IDF Use of U.S. Weapon Which Severs and Burns Limbs Below Genitals

 

9 questions about the Israel-Palestine conflict you were too embarrassed to ask

Everyone has heard of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Everyone knows it’s bad, that it’s been going on for a long time, and that there is a lot of hatred on both sides.

But you may find yourself less clear on the hows and the whys of the conflict. Why, for example, did Israel begin invading the Palestinian territory of Gaza on Thursday, after 10 days of air strikes that killed at least 235 Palestinians, many of them civilians?

Why is the militant Palestinian group Hamas firing home-made rockets into civilian neighborhoods in Israel?

How did this latest round of violence start in the first place — and why do they hate one another at all?

What follows are the most basic answers to your most basic questions.

Giant, neon-lit disclaimer: these issues are complicated and contentious, and this is not an exhaustive or definitive account of Israel-Palestine’s history or the conflict today. But it’s a place to start. (Nothing complicated: Zionists occupied the land and chased out the inhabitants)

1) What are Israel and Palestine?

That sounds like a very basic question but, in a sense, it’s at the center of the conflict.

46188929_isr_w_bank_gaza_416mapIsrael is an officially Jewish country located in the Middle East. Palestine is a set of two physically separate, ethnically Arab and mostly Muslim territories alongside Israel: the West Bank, named for the western shore of the Jordan River, and Gaza.

Those territories are not independent (more on this later). All together, Israel and the Palestinian territories are about as populous as Illinois and about half its size.

Officially, there is no internationally recognized line between Israel and Palestine; the borders are considered to be disputed, and have been for decades.  (The UN demarcation lines of 1947 were drawn clearly)

So is the status of Palestine: some countries consider Palestine to be an independent state, while others (like the US) consider Palestine to be territories under Israeli occupation.

Both Israelis and Palestinians have claims to the land going back centuries, but the present-day states are relatively new.

2) Why are Israelis and Palestinians fighting?

126633561

Israeli soldiers clash with Palestinian stone throwers at a checkpoint outside Jerusalem (AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP/Getty Images)

This is not, despite what you may have heard, primarily about religion. On the surface at least, it’s very simple: the conflict is over who gets what land and how it is controlled. In execution, though, that gets into a lot of really thorny issues, like: Where are the borders? Can Palestinian refugees return to their former homes in present-day Israel? More on these later.

The decades-long process of resolving that conflict has created another, overlapping conflict: managing the very unpleasant Israeli-Palestinian coexistence, in which Israel has put the Palestinians under suffocating military occupation and Palestinian militant groups terrorize Israelis.

BOTH SIDES HAVE SQUANDERED PEACE AND PERPETUATED CONFLICT, BUT PALESTINIANS TODAY BEAR MOST OF THE SUFFERING” (Said who again?

Those two dimensions of the conflict are made even worse by the long, bitter, violent history between these two peoples. It’s not just that there is lots of resentment and distrust; Israelis and Palestinians have such widely divergent narratives of the last 70-plus years, of what has happened and why, that even reconciling their two realities is extremely difficult. All of this makes it easier for extremists, who oppose any compromise and want to destroy or subjugate the other site entirely, to control the conversation and derail the peace process.

The peace process, by the way, has been going on for decades, but it hasn’t looked at all hopeful since the breakthrough 1993 and 1995 Oslo Accords produced a glimmer of hope that has since dissipated. The conflict has settled into a terrible cycle and peace looks less possible all the time.

Ip_conflict_deaths_total

Something you often hear is that “both sides” are to blame for perpetuating the conflict, and there’s plenty of truth to that. There has always been and remains plenty of culpability to go around, plenty of individuals and groups on both sides that squandered peace and perpetuated conflict many times over. Still, perhaps the most essential truth of the Israel-Palestine conflict today is that the conflict predominantly matters for the human suffering it causes. And while Israelis certainly suffer deeply and in great numbers, the vast majority of the conflict’s toll is incurred by Palestinian civilians. Just above, as one metric of that, are the Israeli and Palestinian conflict-related deaths every month since late 2000.

3) How did this conflict start in the first place?

Arab-israeli-war_1948__1_

(Left map: Passia; center and right maps: Philippe Rekacewicz / Le Monde Diplomatique)

The conflict has been going on since the early 1900s, when the mostly-Arab, mostly-Muslim region was part of the Ottoman Empire and, starting in 1917, a “mandate” run by the British Empire. Hundreds of thousands of Jews were moving into the area, as part of a movement called Zionism among mostly European Jews to escape persecution and establish their own state in their ancestral homeland. (Later, large numbers of Middle Eastern Jews also moved to Israel, either to escape anti-Semitic violence or because they were forcibly expelled.)

Communal violence between Jews and Arabs in British Palestine began spiraling out of control. In 1947, the United Nations approved a plan to divide British Palestine into two mostly independent countries, one for Jews called Israel and one for Arabs called Palestine. Jerusalem, holy city for Jews and Muslims, was to be a special international zone.

The plan was never implemented. Arab leaders in the region saw it as European colonial theft and, in 1948, invaded to keep Palestine unified. The Israeli forces won the 1948 war, but they pushed well beyond the UN-designated borders to claim land that was to have been part of Palestine, including the western half of Jerusalem. They also uprooted and expelled entire Palestinian communities, creating about 700,000 refugees, whose descendants now number 7 million and are still considered refugees.

The 1948 war ended with Israel roughly controlling the territory that you will see marked on today’s maps as “Israel”; everything except for the West Bank and Gaza, which is where most Palestinian fled to (many also ended up in refugee camps in neighboring countries) and are today considered the Palestinian territories. The borders between Israel and Palestine have been disputed and fought over ever since. So has the status of those Palestinian refugees and the status of Jerusalem.

That’s the first major dimension of the conflict: reconciling the division that opened in 1948. The second began in 1967, when Israel put those two Palestinian territories under military occupation.

4) Why is Israel occupying the Palestinian territories?

2350412

A Palestinian boy next to the Israeli wall around the town of Qalqilya (David Silverman/Getty Images)

This is a hugely important part of the conflict today, especially for Palestinians.

Israel’s military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza began in 1967. Up to that point, Gaza had been (more or less) controlled by Egypt and the West Bank by Jordan. But in 1967 there was another war between Israel and its Arab neighbors, during which Israel occupied the two Palestinian territories. (Israel also took control of Syria’s Golan Heights, which it annexed in 1981, and Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, which it returned to Egypt in 1982.)

Israeli forces have occupied and controlled the West Bank ever since. It withdrew its occupying troops and settlers from Gaza in 2005, but maintains a full blockade of the territory, which has turned Gaza into what human rights organizations sometimes call an “open-air prison” and has pushed the unemployment rate up to 40 percent.

Settlements_westbank-gaza_01_420297d041Israel says the occupation is necessary for security given its tiny size: to protect Israelis from Palestinian attacks and to provide a buffer from foreign invasions. But that does not explain the settlers.

Settlers are Israelis who move into the West Bank. They are widely considered to violate international law, which forbids an occupying force from moving its citizens into occupied territory. Many of the 500,000 settlers are just looking for cheap housing; most live within a few miles of the Israeli border, often in the around surrounding Jerusalem.

Others move deep into the West Bank to claim land for Jews, out of religious fervor and/or a desire to see more or all of the West Bank absorbed into Israel. While Israel officially forbids this and often evicts these settlers, many are still able to take root.

In the short term, settlers of all forms make life for Palestinians even more difficult, by forcing the Israeli government to guard them with walls or soldiers that further constrain Palestinians. In the long term, the settlers create what are sometimes called “facts on the ground”: Israeli communities that blur the borders and expand land that Israel could claim for itself in any eventual peace deal.

The Israeli occupation of the West Bank is all-consuming for the Palestinians who live there, constrained by Israeli checkpoints and 20-foot walls, subject to an Israeli military justice system in which on average two children are arrested every day, stuck with an economy stifled by strict Israeli border control, and countless other indignities large and small.

5) Can we take a quick music break?

Music breaks like this are usually an opportunity to step back and appreciate the aspects of a people and culture beyond the conflict that has put them in the news. And it’s true that there is much more to Israelis and Palestinians than their conflict. But music has also been a really important medium by which Israelis and Palestinians deal with and think about the conflict. The degree to which the conflict has seeped into Israel-Palestinian music is a sign of how deeply and pervasively it effects Israelis and Palestinians.

Above, from the wealth of Palestinian hip-hop is the group DAM, whose name is both an acronym for Da Arabian MCs and the Arabic verb for “to last forever.” The group has been around since the late 1990s and are from the Israeli city of Lod, Israeli citizens who are part of the country’s Arab minority. The Arab Israeli experience, typically one of solidarity with Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza and a sense that Arab-Israelis are far from equal in the Jewish state, comes through in their music, which is highly political and deals with themes of disenfranchisement and dispossession in the great tradition of American hip-hop.

Christiane Amanpour interviewed DAM about their music last year. Above is their song “I Don’t Have Freedom,” full English lyrics of which are here, from their 2007 album Dedication. Sample line: “We’ve been like this more than 50 years / Living as prisoners behind the bars of paragraphs /Of agreements that change nothing.”

 

Now here is a sample of Israel’s wonderful jazz scene, one of the best in the world, from the bassist and band leader Avishai Cohen. Cohen is best known in the US for his celebrated 2006 instrumental album Continuo, but let’s instead listen to the song “El Hatzipor” from 2009’s Aurora.

The lyrics are from an 1892 poem of the same name, meaning “To the Bird,” by the Ukrainian Jewish poet Hayim Nahman Bialik. The poem (translated here) expresses the hopeful yearning among early European Zionists like Bialik to escape persecution in Europe and find salvation in the holy land; that it still resonates among Israelis over 100 years later is a reminder of both the tremendous hopes invested in the dream of a Jewish state, and perhaps the sense that this dream is still not secure.

6) Why is there fighting today between Israel and Gaza?

156486584

A Palestinian man looks over the site of an Israeli air strike in Gaza (MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

On the surface, this is just the latest round of fighting in 27 years of war between Israel and Hamas, a Palestinian militant group that formed in 1987 seeks Israel’s destruction and is internationally recognized as a terrorist organization for its attacks targeting civilians — and which since 2006 has ruled Gaza. Israeli forces periodically attack Hamas and other militant groups in Gaza, typically with air strikes but in 2006 and 2009 with ground invasions.

ONLY HAMAS DELIBERATELY TARGETS CIVILIANS, BUT MOST ARE STILL PALESTINIANS KILLED BY ISRAELI STRIKES

The latest round of fighting was sparked when members of Hamas in the West Bank murdered three Israeli youths who were studying there on June 10. Though the Hamas members appear to have acted without approval from their leadership, which nonetheless praised the attack, Israel responded by arresting large numbers of Hamas personnel in the West Bank and with air strikes against the group in Gaza.

After some Israeli extremists murdered a Palestinian youth in Jerusalem and Israeli security forces cracked down on protests, compounding Palestinian outrage, Hamas and other Gaza groups launched dozens of rockets into Israel, which responded with many more air strikes. So far the fighting has killed one Israeli and 230 Palestinians; two UN agencies have separately estimated that 70-plus percent of the fatalities are civilians. On Thursday, July 17, Israeli ground forces invaded Gaza, which Israel says is to shut down tunnels that Hamas could use to cross into Israel.

That get backs to that essential truth about the conflict today: Palestinian civilians endure the brunt of it. While Israel targets militants and Hamas targets civilians, Israel’s disproportionate military strength and its willingness to target militants based in dense urban communities means that Palestinians civilians are far more likely to be killed than any other group.

But those are just the surface reasons; there’s a lot more going on here as well.

7) Why does this violence keep happening?

97758752

Palestinian youth throw stones at an Israeli tank in 2003. (SAIF DAHLAH/AFP/Getty Images)

The simple version is that violence has become the status quo and that trying for peace is risky, so leaders on both ends seem to believe that managing the violence is preferable, while the Israeli and Palestinian publics show less and less interest in pressuring their leaders to take risks for peace.

Hamas’s commitment to terrorism and to Israel’s destruction lock Gazans into a conflict with Israel that can never be won and that produces little more than Palestinian civilian deaths. Israel’s blockade on Gaza, which strangles economic life there and punishes civilians, helps produce a climate that is hospitable to extremism, and allows Hamas to nurture a belief that even if Hamas may never win, at least refusing to put down their weapons is a form of liberation.

Many Palestinians in Gaza naturally compare Hamas to Palestinian leaders in the West Bank, who have emphasized peace and compromise and negotiations — only to have been rewarded with an Israeli military occupation that shows no sign of ending and ever-expanding settlements. This is not to endorse that logic, but it is not difficult to see why some Palestinians might conclude that violent “resistance” is preferable.

That sense of Palestinian hopelessness and distrust in Israel and the peace process has been a major contributor to violence in recent years. In the early 2000s, there was also a lot of fighting between Israel and Palestinians in the West Bank. This was called the Second Intifada (uprising), and followed a less-violent Palestinian uprising against the occupation in the late 1980s.

In the Second Intifada, which was the culmination of Palestinian frustration with the failure of the 1990s peace process, Palestinian militants adopted suicide bombings of Israeli buses and other forms of terror. Israel responded with a severe military crack-down. The fighting killed approximately 3,200 Palestinians and 1,100 Israelis.

763420

A 2002 Palestinian bus bombing that killed 18 in Jerusalem (Getty Images)

It’s not just Palestinians, though: many Israelis also increasingly distrust Palestinians and their leaders and see them as innately hostile to peace. In the parlance of Israel-Palestine, the expression for this attitude is, “We don’t have a partner for peace.” That feeling became especially deep after the Second Intifada; months of bus bombings and cafe bombings made many Israelis less supportive of peace efforts and more willing to accept or simply ignore the occupation’s effects on Palestinians.

This sense of apathy has been further enabled by Israel’s increasingly successful security programs, such as the Iron Dome system that shoots down Gazan rockets, which insulates many Israelis from the conflict and makes it easier to ignore. Public support for a peace deal that would grant Palestine independence, once high among Israelis, has dropped.

Meanwhile, a fringe movement of right-wing Israeli extremists has become increasingly violent, particularly in the West Bank where many live as settlers, further pulling Israeli politics away from peace and thus allowing the conflict to drift.

(The first Intifada (civil disobedience) was in 1935-38 where the British dispatched 100,000 troops to quell this mass intifada with torture techniques that Nazi Germany adopted integrally)

8) How is the conflict going to end?

142605842

The Dome of the Rock (at left with gold dome) is one of the holiest sites in Islam and sits atop the ancient Temple Mount ruins, the Western Wall of which (at right) is the holiest site in Jerusalem. You can see how this would create logistical problems. (Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

There are three ways the conflict could end. Only one of them is both viable and peaceful — the two-state solution — but it is also extremely difficult, and the more time goes on the harder it gets.

One-state solution: The first is to erase the borders and put Israelis and Palestinians together into one equal, pluralistic state, called the “one-state solution.” Very few people think this could be viable for the simple reason of demographics; Arabs would very soon outnumber Jews. After generations of feeling disenfranchised and persecuted by Israel, the Arab majority would almost certainly vote to dismantle everything that makes Israel a Jewish state. Israelis, after everything they’ve done to finally achieve a Jewish state after thousands of years of their own persecution, would never surrender that state and willingly become a minority among a population they see as hostile.

Destruction of one side: The second way this could end is with one side outright vanquishing the other, in what would certainly be a catastrophic abuse of human rights. This is the option preferred by extremists such as Hamas and far-right Israeli settlers. In the Palestinian extremist version, Israel is abolished and replaced with a single Palestinian state; Jews become a minority, most likely replacing today’s conflict with an inverse conflict. In the Israeli extremist version, Israel annexes the West Bank and Gaza entirely, either turning Palestinians into second-class citizens in the manner of apartheid South Africa or expelling them en masse.

Two-state solution: The third option is for both Israelis and Palestinians to have their own independent states; that’s called the “two-state solution” and it’s advocated by most everyone as the only option that would create long-term peace. But it requires working out lots of details so thorny and difficult that it’s not clear if it will, or can, happen. Eventually, the conflict will have dragged on for so long that this solution will become impossible.

9) Why is it so hard to make peace?

51675382

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, and Israeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin hold Nobel Peace Prizes won in 1994 for their 1993 Oslo Accords. A follow-on agreement in 1995 was the last major Israeli-Palestinian peace deal. (Photo by Yaakov Saar/GPO via Getty Images)

The one-state solution is hard because there is no viable, realistic version that both sides would accept. In theory, the two-state solution is great. But it poses some very difficult questions. Here are the four big ones and why they’re so tough to solve. To be clear, these aren’t abstract concepts but real, heavily debated issues that have sunk peace talks before:

JerusalemBoth sides claim Jerusalem as their capital; it’s also a center of Jewish and Muslim (and Christian) holy sites that are literally located physically on top of one another, in the antiquity-era walled Old City that is not at all well shaped to be divided into two countries. Making the division even tougher, Israeli communities have been building up more and more in and around the city.

West Bank bordersThere’s no clear agreement on where precisely to draw the borders, which roughly follow the armistice line of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, especially since hundreds of thousands of Israeli settlers have built up suburban-style communities just on the Palestinian side of the line. This one is not actually impossible — Israel could give Palestine some land as part of “land swaps” in exchange for settler-occupied territory — but it’s still hard. The more time goes on, the more settlements expand, the harder it becomes to create a viable Palestinian state.

THE BIGGEST PROBLEM OF ALL MAY BE TIME: IT’S RUNNING OUT

RefugeesThis one is really hard. There are, officially, seven million Palestinian refugees, who are designated as such because their descendants fled or were expelled from what is today Israel; places like Ramla and Jaffa. Palestinians frequently ask for what they call the “right of return”: permission to return to their land and live with full rights. That sounds like a no-brainer, but Israel’s objection is that if they absorb seven million Palestinian returnees, then Jews will become a minority, which for the reasons explained above Israelis will never accept. There are ideas to work around the problem, like financial restitution, but no agreement on them.

Security: This is another big one. For Palestinians, security needs are simple: a sovereign Palestinian state. For Israelis, it’s a bit more complicated: Israelis fear that an independent Palestine could turn hostile and ally with other Middle East states to launch the sort of invasion Israel barely survived in 1973. Maybe more plausibly, Israelis worry that Hamas would take over an independent West Bank and use it to launch attacks on Israelis, as they’ve done with Gaza.

Any compromise would likely involve Palestinians giving up some sovereignty, for example promising permanent de-militarization or allowing an international peacekeeping force, and after years of feeling heavily abused by strong-handed Israeli forces, Palestinians are not eager about the idea of Israel having veto power over their sovereignty and security.

Those are all very difficult problems. But here’s the thing: time is running out. The more that the conflict drags on, the more difficult it will be to solve any of these issues, much less all of them. That will make it harder and harder for Israel to justify keeping Gaza under blockade and the West Bank under occupation; eventually it will have to unilaterally withdraw, which the current leadership opposes, or it will have to annex the territories and become either an apartheid-style state that denies full rights to those new Palestinian citizens or abandon its Jewish state.

Meanwhile, extremism and apathy and distrust are rising on both sides. The violence of the conflict is becoming status quo, a regularly recurring event that is replacing the peace process itself as the way by which the conflict advances. It is making things worse for Israelis and Palestinians alike all the time, and unless they can break from the hatred and violence long enough to make peace, that will continue.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

January 2018
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Blog Stats

  • 1,055,962 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 525 other followers

%d bloggers like this: