Adonis Diaries

Archive for the ‘health/medicine’ Category

What’s that Paleolithic MD Diet? Back to the origin of Hunter/Gatherer?

So how did the Whole 30 help my health? Here are a few observations:

Acne: I don’t have terrible acne at all, but I do still suffer with an occasional pimple. For three weeks I have not had a single pimple. Pretty amazing stuff.

Energy: I thought Paleo had given me all the energy I needed, but I was wrong that it was all I could have! Although subtle, the increase in energy on a day to day basis I experienced by taking the next step to the Whole 30 was encouraging. I never really got tired, even on the long drives during our vacation which in the past would have sent me shopping for caffeine in one form or another.

Cravings: Again, although I felt my food cravings were gone once I went Paleo, the Whole 30 taught me that my major remaining craving, diet soda, was as strong as ever. It took a good while to get rid of this one, but it was well worth it. Diet soda turned out to be the one little thing I kept for myself, and I had no idea the pull it had on me. I don’t think that drinking diet soda made me feel tremendously bad per se, but I was drinking it for the WRONG reasons. That was enough to concern me and push through the 30 days. Will I ever drink diet soda again? I would be a bold faced liar if I said I would not, but my intake will be cut by 80-90% long term. That is something I can live with, and be very proud of.

Weight Loss: After changing to a Paleo diet I lost 25 pounds without really trying at all. During my Whole 30 I lost 5 more pounds, so that is 30 pounds overall…not too shabby!. My BMI has dropped from 30.6 to 26.3. I still have some way to go, but I’m very pleased with the overall drop so far.

Mood: I have noticed a definite improvement in my mood during the Whole 30. I’m generally a pretty positive guy, and I really like what I do. Still, everyone has times when stress or anxiety get to them. This would happen to me typically when the work day would zoom out of control, or the kids would act up. I think two things led to the improvement in my mood:

—Knowledge of Health – Just knowing that I was doing something very important for my health was so invigorating. Diet, weight, and emotion are intertwined to the point they are indistinguishable. Negative emotions can be crippling, but positive emotions can fuel you to the max. I knew I was getting healthier every day, and that made me feel awesome.

—Feeling of Health – Besides knowing I was healthier, I FELT healthier! For all the reasons above, as well as sleeping well, I just had a general glow of health to me. Other’s noticed and made comments, and that will help anyone feel better! I don’t think I can really explain this, you just gotta try it to find out!

Must Have Foods: Many people are looking for the foods that are key to a successful Whole 30, and I will give my humble opinion. Here is what I couldn’t live without.

-Avocados – There is no better snack alone, or added to a protein than one.

-Coconut Milk – Such a great milk substitute for any occasion.

-Dried Fruit – Watch this as it can be a sugar substitute for you, but in moderation; often saves me

-Eggs – What else can you say about the totally versatile egg?

Homemade Beef Jerky Sometimes you just need beef!

Big picture: So what is the big picture benefit to me from my Whole 30? There are several things I would like to point out. First, it truly allowed me to put the focus back on using food as nourishment for my body, and not as a pleasure per se. Now look, I love food, and that will never change. But it’s so hard to separate sometimes the difference between what you eat to fill a “void” or “craving” in your life, versus what you eat to adequately fuel your body. You can easily fuel your body with wonderful, real, and delicious food which means you don’t have to turn to food for anything other than that. As I say, Real Food for Real Health.

Limiting my diet to this real food also brought back something else that I feel we often lose; the real taste of food. We are inundated with flavors that we quite frankly were not ever supposed to experience! As you will all (if you are smart!) soon read in the Hartwig’s book It Starts With Food the food industry has created foods that are fattier, saltier, and sweeter than anything nature can provide. This kind of numbs our taste buds to real food. Take for example marinating a steak such as in a sugary Teriyaki sauce. If you have a wonderful cut of beef, why take away from the flavor at all with anything more than a little salt and pepper? Why not taste the meat for what it is, and the glorious fat for all it can be? Are “smoked” almonds really better than raw almonds? Is a maraschino cherry better than a super ripe fresh cherry? Is a tub of store bought greenish faux-guacamole better than home made, or just a freshly sliced ripe avocado? If you really taste things, the answer is no for all these.

The reason that the food industry has designed foods to be fattier, saltier, and sweeter than nature intended is that they are taking tasteless and inedible food and creating a “food” for you to eat, and for them to make money off of. By design the Whole 30 takes all that away. What you are left with it food as God intended it to be. The Whole 30 gave me my taste buds back!

Lastly, the Whole 30 taught me that once again, even when I think I’m doing my best, I am not! It’s not good enough to do Paleo and hang on to dietary strongholds. The effort to bring about even more change in your life can produce serious dividends. I learned that and am so glad that I did.

So, you only have two things left to do. First, commit to doing your own Whole 30 right NOW! And second, pre-order the Hartwig’s book and soak it up as soon as you can. I will be doing a full review of the book once I am finished, but I am taking my time to really gain everything I can from it. I am not a paid spokesman, and I gain nothing from you getting their book. To the contrary, it is you that has everything to gain from reading it.

Please consider doing the Whole 30 challenge yourself. Ask yourself these questions…is what you are doing right now working? Are you happy with how you feel? Could you use more energy? Are you sleeping soundly? Are you worried about chronic disease? Are you sick and tired of being CONTROLLED by food? It’s just 30 days…

Public Health is ripe for a major rethinking: Everywhere

COVID-19 and inequity — public health needs a third revolution

For many Americans, George Floyd’s murder ignited a new level of momentum to confront police violence against people of color.

The COVID-19 pandemic — which is killing black Americans at nearly two and a half times the rate of whites — has put a spotlight on our nation’s shameful racial divide in public health.

While the first and second public health revolutions vastly extended life expectancy by making strides against communicable disease (cholera, typhoid and dysentery) and chronic illness (heart disease and diabetes), racial gaps (and minority ethnic gaps) remain a persistent contributor to negative health outcomes.

COVID-19 and inequity — public health needs a third revolution

In a nation with growing economic disparities, scarred by centuries of systemic racism, the third revolution in public health must address the root causes of our remaining pervasive health inequities — poverty, pollution, housing, food security and other basic needs.

Since our systems have resulted in these issues disproportionately impacting communities of color, we need to conceive, develop and implement solutions that prioritize the wellbeing of people and communities that have been overlooked for far too long.

It’s a daunting task, to be sure. But, with an approach I call precision community health, we can target our limited resources to be effective at addressing the most urgent public health inequities, while also supporting the eradication of racism throughout our society.

Investment is needed in public health systems, including state-of-the-art data collection and communications tools. With these we can collect granular data on everything from asthma rates to housing conditions and police violence, broken down by race and income. That data can then be transformed into knowledge to guide decision-making.

We can leverage social media and other communications strategies to deliver precisely targeted messages to ensure people have information they need, when and where they need it, to make informed decisions for themselves and their loved ones.

We can also invest in people by creating a national Public Health Corps, similar to AmeriCorps. Recruitment could start with our country’s community health workers, our invaluable set of frontline public health workers who are already trusted members of the communities we serve today.

But importantly, these workers’ expertise and training can also build equity in communities today, by linking people to resources on housing, food security, employment and more.

Community health workers are also uniquely positioned to have an immediate impact on the spread of COVID-19 by performing the critical task of contact tracing — reaching out to those who test positive for COVID-19, helping them identify others they may have been exposed, then supporting them through quarantine and testing.

For any of our efforts to succeed, we must account for and honestly confront the distrust many people feel in our public institutions. In this time of massive societal upheaval, we have a tremendous opportunity to shift our focus and resources to fully embrace public health solutions. But our field will need to reckon with our own painful history of systemic racism to realize our full potential.

If we are to continue making the breakthroughs that improve and extend lives as public health has done for decades, we must embrace the moment we are in. It’s time to rethink public health by understanding the inequities that are making people sick and targeting resources where they are needed most.

Bechara Choucair, a family physician by training, was commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health from 2009 to 2014. He is currently senior vice president and chief health officer at Kaiser Permanente and author of “Precision Community Health: Four Innovations for Well-being.”

The pandemic driving hundreds of millions of people toward starvation and poverty

By Ishaan TharoorSeptember 25, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. GMT+3

Financiers and traders on Wall Street may be starting to feel optimistic, but for most people the gloom is only deepening.

In the United States, thousands of people continue to die of covid-19 each week, while some 30 million people remain unemployed.

Industrial output and consumer spending are still well below pre-pandemic levels, with experts pointing to evidence of spiraling inequality as winter approaches.

In Europe, a second surge of infections has triggered warnings and shutdowns, compounding the continent’s economic jitters.

Yet the worst pain is centered in the developing world.

In recent weeks, a host of international organizations and agencies have sounded alarms over crises provoked by the novel coronavirus.

While many Western governments managed to hold the line through stimulus programs, poorer nations are floundering amid massive public debt and shortfalls in state revenue. All the while, the roughly 2 billion people who eke out a living in the world’s informal economies face varying degrees of deprivation.

David Beasley, the executive director of the U.N.’s World Food Program, warned during a Sept. 18 briefing that a “wave of hunger and famine still threatens to sweep across the globe.” He said his organization needed close to $5 billion to prevent 30 million people from dying of starvation.

According to the agency, some 135 million people around the world faced acute food insecurity before the pandemic, and that number is expected to double this year.

The World Bank says the pandemic may undermine international efforts to bring down the global extreme poverty rate to 3 percent by 2030 — and projects that existing poverty levels will grow this year for the first time since the 1990s.

Some 160 million people in Asia alone may be forced below the poverty line, according to the Asian Development Bank. In Latin America, that figure is around 45 million people, according to a recent U.N. study.

UNICEF, the U.N. Children’s Fund, calculated that 872 million students in 51 countries are unable to head back to their classrooms. More than half that number live in circumstances where remote learning is impossible — a scale that suggests a generational crisis in education.AD

As hospitals and clinics around the world remain swamped, UNICEF fears new declines in infant and maternal health. “When children are denied access to health services because the system is overrun, and when women are afraid to give birth at the hospital for fear of infection, they, too, may become casualties of COVID-19,” Henrietta Fore, UNICEF’s executive director, said in a statement.

“Without urgent investments to re-start disrupted health systems and services, millions of children under five, especially newborns, could die.

Campaigners who have led the charge to reach the U.N.’s poverty-eradicating “sustainable development goals” warn of an epochal reversal. “We have celebrated decades of historic progress in fighting poverty and disease,” wrote Bill and Melinda Gates in their foundation’s annual “Goalkeepers” report. “But we have to confront the current reality with candor: This progress has now stopped.”

Even with the $18 trillion of stimulus pumped into the global economy, mostly by wealthy governments, the International Monetary Fund projects a cumulative loss of some $12 trillion by the end of 2021.

separate study from the International Labor Organization, a Geneva-based U.N. body, found that the pandemic has already wiped out $3.5 trillion in income from millions of workers around the world. By the ILO’s calculations, projected global working-hour losses in 2020 will be the equivalent of some 245 million lost jobs.

Coronavirus death toll hits 1 million

Some of the worst-hit places are in countries that cannot afford such setbacks. “India’s economic output shrank by 24% in the three months to June compared to the same period last year, worse than any other major economy,” my colleagues Niha Masih and Joanna Slater wrote in a report on Indian university graduates scrambling for meager wages through a government-run rural labor program.

“During the nationwide lockdown, more than 120 million jobs were lost, most of them in the country’s vast informal sector. Many of those workers have returned to work out of sheer necessity, often scraping by on far lower wages.”AD

In Latin America, the economic disaster may be just as acute, if not more so. Leading U.N. officials warn of a “lost decade” in the region, with spiking poverty and entrenched recessions.

The ILO pointed to a “stimulus gap” between rich and poorer countries. “Just as we need to redouble our efforts to beat the virus, so we need to act urgently and at scale to overcome its economic, social and employment impacts,” Guy Ryder, the ILO secretary general, said in a statement. “That includes sustaining support for jobs, businesses and incomes.

By Ishaan TharoorSeptember 25, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. GMT+3

You’re reading an excerpt from the Today’s WorldView newsletter. Sign up to get the rest, including news from around the globe, interesting ideas and opinions to know sent to your inbox every weekday.

Pastor Tito Matheus teaches children in an improvised classroom in a slum in Caracas, Venezuela, on Sept. 16. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)
Pastor Tito Matheus teaches children in an improvised classroom in a slum in Caracas, Venezuela, on Sept. 16. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Financiers and traders on Wall Street may be starting to feel optimistic, but for most people the gloom is only deepening. In the United States, thousands of people continue to die of covid-19 each week, while some 30 million people remain unemployed. Industrial output and consumer spending are still well below pre-pandemic levels, with experts pointing to evidence of spiraling inequality as winter approaches. In Europe, a second surge of infections has triggered warnings and shutdowns, compounding the continent’s economic jitters.

Yet the worst pain is centered in the developing world. In recent weeks, a host of international organizations and agencies have sounded alarms over crises provoked by the novel coronavirus. While many Western governments managed to hold the line through stimulus programs, poorer nations are floundering amid massive public debt and shortfalls in state revenue. All the while, the roughly 2 billion people who eke out a living in the world’s informal economies face varying degrees of deprivation.AD

David Beasley, the executive director of the U.N.’s World Food Program, warned during a Sept. 18 briefing that a “wave of hunger and famine still threatens to sweep across the globe.” He said his organization needed close to $5 billion to prevent 30 million people from dying of starvation. According to the agency, some 135 million people around the world faced acute food insecurity before the pandemic, and that number is expected to double this year.

The World Bank says the pandemic may undermine international efforts to bring down the global extreme poverty rate to 3 percent by 2030 — and projects that existing poverty levels will grow this year for the first time since the 1990s. Some 160 million people in Asia alone may be forced below the poverty line, according to the Asian Development Bank. In Latin America, that figure is around 45 million people, according to a recent U.N. study.

UNICEF, the U.N. Children’s Fund, calculated that 872 million students in 51 countries are unable to head back to their classrooms. More than half that number live in circumstances where remote learning is impossible — a scale that suggests a generational crisis in education.AD

As hospitals and clinics around the world remain swamped, UNICEF fears new declines in infant and maternal health. “When children are denied access to health services because the system is overrun, and when women are afraid to give birth at the hospital for fear of infection, they, too, may become casualties of COVID-19,” Henrietta Fore, UNICEF’s executive director, said in a statement. “Without urgent investments to re-start disrupted health systems and services, millions of children under five, especially newborns, could die.

”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-0&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1309141159797837825&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

Campaigners who have led the charge to reach the U.N.’s poverty-eradicating “sustainable development goals” warn of an epochal reversal. “We have celebrated decades of historic progress in fighting poverty and disease,” wrote Bill and Melinda Gates in their foundation’s annual “Goalkeepers” report. “But we have to confront the current reality with candor: This progress has now stopped.”

Even with the $18 trillion of stimulus pumped into the global economy, mostly by wealthy governments, the International Monetary Fund projects a cumulative loss of some $12 trillion by the end of 2021. A separate study from the International Labor Organization, a Geneva-based U.N. body, found that the pandemic has already wiped out $3.5 trillion in income from millions of workers around the world. By the ILO’s calculations, projected global working-hour losses in 2020 will be the equivalent of some 245 million lost jobs.

Coronavirus death toll hits 1 million

Some of the worst-hit places are in countries that cannot afford such setbacks. “India’s economic output shrank by 24 percent in the three months to June compared to the same period last year, worse than any other major economy,” my colleagues Niha Masih and Joanna Slater wrote in a report on Indian university graduates scrambling for meager wages through a government-run rural labor program. “During the nationwide lockdown, more than 120 million jobs were lost, most of them in the country’s vast informal sector. Many of those workers have returned to work out of sheer necessity, often scraping by on far lower wages.”AD

In Latin America, the economic disaster may be just as acute, if not more so. Leading U.N. officials warn of a “lost decade” in the region, with spiking poverty and entrenched recessions. The ILO pointed to a “stimulus gap” between rich and poorer countries. “Just as we need to redouble our efforts to beat the virus, so we need to act urgently and at scale to overcome its economic, social and employment impacts,” Guy Ryder, the ILO secretary general, said in a statement. “That includes sustaining support for jobs, businesses and incomes.”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-1&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1306713315759009797&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

But it’s unclear how much more wealthy governments are willing to give in the face of their own budget crunches. “Developing countries have been exposed to manifold shocks in a context of anaemic global growth,” Stephanie Blankenburg, the head of debt and development finance at the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development, told the Financial Times. “The international response has been extraordinarily hesitant — way too little, way too late.”

The focus may have to fall on private donors. “Worldwide, there are over 2,000 billionaires with a net worth of $8 trillion. In my home country, the USA, there are 12 individuals alone worth $1 trillion,” said Beasley of WFP. “In fact, reports state that three of them made billions upon billions during COVID. I am not opposed to people making money, but humanity is facing the greatest crisis any of us have seen in our lifetimes.”

Read more:

In Denmark, the forest is the new classroom

Trump and Xi clash as U.N. marks a gloomy 75th birthday

Bolivia’s left could win an upcoming election. U.S. Democrats don’t want a repeat of last year’s crisis.Updated October 2, 2020

Coronavirus: What you need to read

The Washington Post is providing some coronavirus coverage free, including:

The latest: Live updates on coronavirus

Coronavirus maps: Cases and deaths in the U.S. | Cases and deaths worldwide

What you need to know: Vaccine tracker | Coronavirus etiquette | Summertime activities & coronavirus | Hand sanitizer recall | Your life at home | Personal finance guide | Make your own fabric mask | Follow all of our coronavirus coverage and sign up for our free newsletter.

How to help: Your community | Seniors | Restaurants | Keep at-risk people in mind

Asked and answered: What readers want to know about coronavirus

Have you been hospitalized for covid-19Tell us whether you’ve gotten a bill.15 Comments

Ishaan TharoorIshaan Tharoor is a columnist on the foreign desk of The Washington Post, where he authors the Today’s WorldView newsletter and column. He previously was a senior editor and correspondent at Time magazine, based first in Hong Kong and later in New York.FollowMore from The Post

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The pandemic pushes hundreds of millions of people toward starvation and poverty

By Ishaan TharoorSeptember 25, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. GMT+3

Financiers and traders on Wall Street may be starting to feel optimistic, but for most people the gloom is only deepening.

In the United States, thousands of people continue to die of covid-19 each week, while some 30 million people remain unemployed.

Industrial output and consumer spending are still well below pre-pandemic levels, with experts pointing to evidence of spiraling inequality as winter approaches.

In Europe, a second surge of infections has triggered warnings and shutdowns, compounding the continent’s economic jitters.

Yet the worst pain is centered in the developing world.

In recent weeks, a host of international organizations and agencies have sounded alarms over crises provoked by the novel coronavirus. While many Western governments managed to hold the line through stimulus programs, poorer nations are floundering amid massive public debt and shortfalls in state revenue. All the while, the roughly 2 billion people who eke out a living in the world’s informal economies face varying degrees of deprivation.AD

David Beasley, the executive director of the U.N.’s World Food Program, warned during a Sept. 18 briefing that a “wave of hunger and famine still threatens to sweep across the globe.” He said his organization needed close to $5 billion to prevent 30 million people from dying of starvation. According to the agency, some 135 million people around the world faced acute food insecurity before the pandemic, and that number is expected to double this year.

The World Bank says the pandemic may undermine international efforts to bring down the global extreme poverty rate to 3 percent by 2030 — and projects that existing poverty levels will grow this year for the first time since the 1990s. Some 160 million people in Asia alone may be forced below the poverty line, according to the Asian Development Bank. In Latin America, that figure is around 45 million people, according to a recent U.N. study.

UNICEF, the U.N. Children’s Fund, calculated that 872 million students in 51 countries are unable to head back to their classrooms. More than half that number live in circumstances where remote learning is impossible — a scale that suggests a generational crisis in education.AD

As hospitals and clinics around the world remain swamped, UNICEF fears new declines in infant and maternal health. “When children are denied access to health services because the system is overrun, and when women are afraid to give birth at the hospital for fear of infection, they, too, may become casualties of COVID-19,” Henrietta Fore, UNICEF’s executive director, said in a statement. “Without urgent investments to re-start disrupted health systems and services, millions of children under five, especially newborns, could die.”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-0&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1309141159797837825&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

Campaigners who have led the charge to reach the U.N.’s poverty-eradicating “sustainable development goals” warn of an epochal reversal. “We have celebrated decades of historic progress in fighting poverty and disease,” wrote Bill and Melinda Gates in their foundation’s annual “Goalkeepers” report. “But we have to confront the current reality with candor: This progress has now stopped.”

Even with the $18 trillion of stimulus pumped into the global economy, mostly by wealthy governments, the International Monetary Fund projects a cumulative loss of some $12 trillion by the end of 2021. A separate study from the International Labor Organization, a Geneva-based U.N. body, found that the pandemic has already wiped out $3.5 trillion in income from millions of workers around the world. By the ILO’s calculations, projected global working-hour losses in 2020 will be the equivalent of some 245 million lost jobs.

Coronavirus death toll hits 1 million

Some of the worst-hit places are in countries that cannot afford such setbacks. “India’s economic output shrank by 24 percent in the three months to June compared to the same period last year, worse than any other major economy,” my colleagues Niha Masih and Joanna Slater wrote in a report on Indian university graduates scrambling for meager wages through a government-run rural labor program. “During the nationwide lockdown, more than 120 million jobs were lost, most of them in the country’s vast informal sector. Many of those workers have returned to work out of sheer necessity, often scraping by on far lower wages.”AD

In Latin America, the economic disaster may be just as acute, if not more so. Leading U.N. officials warn of a “lost decade” in the region, with spiking poverty and entrenched recessions. The ILO pointed to a “stimulus gap” between rich and poorer countries. “Just as we need to redouble our efforts to beat the virus, so we need to act urgently and at scale to overcome its economic, social and employment impacts,” Guy Ryder, the ILO secretary general, said in a statement. “That includes sustaining support for jobs, businesses and incomes.”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-1&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1306713315759009797&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

But it’s unclear how much more wealthy governments are willing to give in the face of their own budget crunches. “Developing countries have been exposed to manifold shocks in a context of anaemic global growth,” Stephanie Blankenburg, the head of debt and development finance at the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development, told the Financial Times. “The international response has been extraordinarily hesitant — way too little, way too late.”

The focus may have to fall on private donors. “Worldwide, there are over 2,000 billionaires with a net worth of $8 trillion. In my home country, the USA, there are 12 individuals alone worth $1 trillion,” said Beasley of WFP. “In fact, reports state that three of them made billions upon billions during COVID. I am not opposed to people making money, but humanity is facing the greatest crisis any of us have seen in our lifetimes.”

Read more:

In Denmark, the forest is the new classroom

Trump and Xi clash as U.N. marks a gloomy 75th birthday

Bolivia’s left could win an upcoming election. U.S. Democrats don’t want a repeat of last year’s crisis.Updated October 2, 2020

Coronavirus: What you need to read

The Washington Post is providing some coronavirus coverage free, including:

The latest: Live updates on coronavirus

Coronavirus maps: Cases and deaths in the U.S. | Cases and deaths worldwide

What you need to know: Vaccine tracker | Coronavirus etiquette | Summertime activities & coronavirus | Hand sanitizer recall | Your life at home | Personal finance guide | Make your own fabric mask | Follow all of our coronavirus coverage and sign up for our free newsletter.

How to help: Your community | Seniors | Restaurants | Keep at-risk people in mind

Asked and answered: What readers want to know about coronavirus

Have you been hospitalized for covid-19Tell us whether you’ve gotten a bill.15 Comments

Ishaan TharoorIshaan Tharoor is a columnist on the foreign desk of The Washington Post, where he authors the Today’s WorldView newsletter and column. He previously was a senior editor and correspondent at Time magazine, based first in Hong Kong and later in New York.FollowMore from The Post

Today’s Headlines

The most important news stories of the day, curated by Post editors and delivered every morning.

By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy PolicyPAID PROMOTED STORIES

Recommended bySign in to join the conversationMost ReadWorld

Today’s Headlines

The most important news stories of the day, curated by Post editors and delivered every morning.

By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy PolicyPodcastPost ReportsThe Washington Post’s daily podcast: unparalleled reports, expert insight, clear analysis. For your ears.Add to Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAbout Us

Get The Post

Help

Terms of Use

washingtonpost.com © 1996-2020 The Washington Post

Financiers and traders on Wall Street may be starting to feel optimistic, but for most people the gloom is only deepening. In the United States, thousands of people continue to die of covid-19 each week, while some 30 million people remain unemployed. Industrial output and consumer spending are still well below pre-pandemic levels, with experts pointing to evidence of spiraling inequality as winter approaches. In Europe, a second surge of infections has triggered warnings and shutdowns, compounding the continent’s economic jitters.

Yet the worst pain is centered in the developing world. In recent weeks, a host of international organizations and agencies have sounded alarms over crises provoked by the novel coronavirus. While many Western governments managed to hold the line through stimulus programs, poorer nations are floundering amid massive public debt and shortfalls in state revenue. All the while, the roughly 2 billion people who eke out a living in the world’s informal economies face varying degrees of deprivation.AD

David Beasley, the executive director of the U.N.’s World Food Program, warned during a Sept. 18 briefing that a “wave of hunger and famine still threatens to sweep across the globe.” He said his organization needed close to $5 billion to prevent 30 million people from dying of starvation. According to the agency, some 135 million people around the world faced acute food insecurity before the pandemic, and that number is expected to double this year.

The World Bank says the pandemic may undermine international efforts to bring down the global extreme poverty rate to 3 percent by 2030 — and projects that existing poverty levels will grow this year for the first time since the 1990s. Some 160 million people in Asia alone may be forced below the poverty line, according to the Asian Development Bank. In Latin America, that figure is around 45 million people, according to a recent U.N. study.

UNICEF, the U.N. Children’s Fund, calculated that 872 million students in 51 countries are unable to head back to their classrooms. More than half that number live in circumstances where remote learning is impossible — a scale that suggests a generational crisis in education.AD

As hospitals and clinics around the world remain swamped, UNICEF fears new declines in infant and maternal health. “When children are denied access to health services because the system is overrun, and when women are afraid to give birth at the hospital for fear of infection, they, too, may become casualties of COVID-19,” Henrietta Fore, UNICEF’s executive director, said in a statement. “Without urgent investments to re-start disrupted health systems and services, millions of children under five, especially newborns, could die.”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-0&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1309141159797837825&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

Campaigners who have led the charge to reach the U.N.’s poverty-eradicating “sustainable development goals” warn of an epochal reversal. “We have celebrated decades of historic progress in fighting poverty and disease,” wrote Bill and Melinda Gates in their foundation’s annual “Goalkeepers” report. “But we have to confront the current reality with candor: This progress has now stopped.”

Even with the $18 trillion of stimulus pumped into the global economy, mostly by wealthy governments, the International Monetary Fund projects a cumulative loss of some $12 trillion by the end of 2021. A separate study from the International Labor Organization, a Geneva-based U.N. body, found that the pandemic has already wiped out $3.5 trillion in income from millions of workers around the world. By the ILO’s calculations, projected global working-hour losses in 2020 will be the equivalent of some 245 million lost jobs.

Coronavirus death toll hits 1 million

Some of the worst-hit places are in countries that cannot afford such setbacks. “India’s economic output shrank by 24 percent in the three months to June compared to the same period last year, worse than any other major economy,” my colleagues Niha Masih and Joanna Slater wrote in a report on Indian university graduates scrambling for meager wages through a government-run rural labor program. “During the nationwide lockdown, more than 120 million jobs were lost, most of them in the country’s vast informal sector. Many of those workers have returned to work out of sheer necessity, often scraping by on far lower wages.”AD

In Latin America, the economic disaster may be just as acute, if not more so. Leading U.N. officials warn of a “lost decade” in the region, with spiking poverty and entrenched recessions. The ILO pointed to a “stimulus gap” between rich and poorer countries. “Just as we need to redouble our efforts to beat the virus, so we need to act urgently and at scale to overcome its economic, social and employment impacts,” Guy Ryder, the ILO secretary general, said in a statement. “That includes sustaining support for jobs, businesses and incomes.”https://platform.twitter.com/embed/index.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-1&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1306713315759009797&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fworld%2F2020%2F09%2F25%2Fpandemic-pushes-hundreds-millions-people-toward-starvation-poverty%2F&siteScreenName=WashingtonPost&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ed20a2b%3A1601588405575&width=550px

But it’s unclear how much more wealthy governments are willing to give in the face of their own budget crunches. “Developing countries have been exposed to manifold shocks in a context of anaemic global growth,” Stephanie Blankenburg, the head of debt and development finance at the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development, told the Financial Times. “The international response has been extraordinarily hesitant — way too little, way too late.”

The focus may have to fall on private donors. “Worldwide, there are over 2,000 billionaires with a net worth of $8 trillion. In my home country, the USA, there are 12 individuals alone worth $1 trillion,” said Beasley of WFP. “In fact, reports state that three of them made billions upon billions during COVID. I am not opposed to people making money, but humanity is facing the greatest crisis any of us have seen in our lifetimes.”

US investigates second suspected case of mystery ‘syndrome’ near White House

By Katie Bo WilliamsJeremy Herb and Natasha Bertrand, CNN

Updated May 17, 2021

(CNN)Two White House officials were struck by a mysterious illness late last year — including one who was passing through a gate onto the property — newly revealed details that come as investigators are still struggling to determine who or what is behind these strange incidents.

Multiple sources tell CNN that the episodes affected two officials on the National Security Council in November 2020, one the day after the presidential election and one several weeks later.

The cases are consistent with an inexplicable constellation of sensory experiences and physical symptoms that have sickened more than 100 US diplomats, spies and troops around the globe and have come to be known as “Havana Syndrome.

The intelligence community still isn’t sure who is causing the strange array of nervous system symptoms, or if they can be definitively termed “attacks.”

Even the technology that might cause such an inconsistent set of symptoms is a matter of debate

The first incident, previously reported by CNN, occurred after the 2020 election as the NSC official was attempting to pass through an unstaffed gate near the Ellipse, according to a source with direct knowledge of the incident. That person suffered only mild symptoms after the encounter, including headaches and sleeplessness, all of which went away after a week.

The second official, whose case has not been previously reported, was struck weeks later near an entrance to the White House grounds, two sources familiar with the matter told CNN.

The second official suffered more serious symptoms and was ill enough to seek immediate medical treatment.

The twin incidents in downtown Washington, along with a previous suspected case in northern Virginia in 2019, have raised concerns that the wave of episodes first seen only among Americans overseas is now occurring in rising numbers on US soil — and maybe even at the President’s front door.

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This story is based on interviews with over a dozen current and former officials with knowledge of the US efforts to respond to these mysterious incidents.

For five years now, investigators have struggled to explain the strange experiences reported by US diplomats and other government workers in Cuba, Russia, China and elsewhere — episodes that in some cases have led to chronic headaches and brain injuries.

Victims have reported experiencing sudden vertigo, headaches and head pressure, sometimes accompanying by a “piercing directional noise.”

Some reported being able to escape the symptoms simply by moving to another room — and step back into them by returning to their original position.

The number of suspected cases worldwide is increasing, according to a recent statement from the leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee. There have been more than 130 cases worldwide over the past five years, according to the New York Times, which reported at least one episode taking place overseas in the last two weeks.

There have also been suspected cases in Europe, CNN previously reported, and additional suspected cases are being investigated domestically, according to sources with knowledge of the matter.

‘Anomalous health incidents’

Under pressure from lawmakers and victims, the Biden administration has dramatically ramped up its efforts to “identify the cause of these incidents, determine attribution, increase collection efforts, and prevent” what the intelligence community now terms “anomalous health incidents,” a spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence said in a statement on Tuesday.

CIA Director Bill Burns has begun to receive daily briefings on the matter, including some from victims of these strange encounters, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

But even a definitive diagnosis proving any one case is, in fact, “Havana Syndrome,” has proven frustratingly difficult, officials say.

Victims suffer a myriad of different symptoms both initially and over time, and scientists, engineers and medical experts are divided over whether all of the cases under investigation can be attributed to a single cause.

The government has successfully identified and fielded a blood test that can point to some markers that may indicate exposure, according to two US officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

That test was among the diagnostic tools used in recent cases of intelligence officers who reported symptoms consistent with Havana Syndrome, and in the case of at least one of the White House victims, according to sources familiar with the matter.

But the test alone is not enough to offer a clear diagnosis.

Multiple agencies are also trying to create or repurpose a type of sensor that could be used to detect anomalous activity and, theoretically, help establish that personnel are being hit, according to two current US officials and one former US official — although sources cautioned such a tool would only be able to detect the activity, not protect from it.

“How do you counter something you don’t know is coming?” said one intelligence official.

March report from the National Academy of Sciences found that “directed, pulsed radiofrequency energy” was the most likely cause of the strange set of symptoms — so-called microwave energy — but officials caution that even that isn’t known for sure, and some academics have publicly dismissed the theory as unsupported.

“The whole ‘microwave’ theory is not because someone has any intelligence to suggest it, or someone saw it happen,” said one source familiar with the intelligence on the matter. “This is what’s been so maddening. It’s based purely on symptoms.”

“We have no hard leads — just all circumstantial evidence. And it’s circumstantial evidence that could also be something completely different.”

A National Security Agency memo made public in 2014 revealed that the agency had intelligence from as recently as 2012 pointing to the possible existence of “a high-powered microwave system weapon … designed to bathe a target’s living quarters in microwaves, causing numerous physical effects, including a damaged nervous system.”

But the memo did not definitively confirm the existence of such a weapon, or which country may have developed it.

And some officials have questioned how such a weapon might be discreetly powered — especially in crowded downtown Washington — and focused so precisely that it would only cause injury to the target’s brain and not the rest of the body.

Equally murky is who might be behind these incidents, if they are indeed attacks.

Some evidence points to Russia as a likely culprit, officials say, but it is largely circumstantial: Russia is one of only a few countries that has dedicated research and development to what some experts believe could be the kind of weapon that could cause symptoms consistent with Havana Syndrome.

Some officials tracking Havana Syndrome suggest that, if a foreign adversary is using some kind of directed energy weapon, the intent may not be to harass or maim US personnel, but rather to collect information from their cell phones.

“I don’t know if they stumbled across a collection mechanism that allows it to be used as a weapon system or if they are just trying to collect (data from cell phones) and it (causes) adverse side effects,” said one person with direct knowledge of the incidents. “From what I read that the jury’s still out on what exactly people thought it was.”

‘We don’t have the smoking gun’

The new incidents, including those in Washington, have sparked growing frustration among lawmakers on Capitol Hill, who say the intelligence community has failed to provide Congress with enough information on what it knows and how it’s responding — and has not properly taken care of the victims.

“I’m appalled that many of these individuals who were injured in the line of duty have had to fight to get adequate medical care, to have their injuries even recognize and acknowledge and to receive financial compensation,” said Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Lawmakers on the House and Senate Intelligence and Armed Services committees have been demanding additional details and have urged intelligence officials to declassify information about the attacks.

Lawmakers have praised Burns’ stated commitment to the issue, but a recent closed-door Senate Intelligence Committee briefing on the subject was one of the committee’s most contentious in recent memory, according to two sources familiar with the briefing.

Congress has also expressed concern that the government has failed to sufficiently coordinate efforts out of multiple agencies — including the Pentagon, intelligence community and State Department — to address the problem.

“There are lots of entities in the government looking at this. We need to have it better coordinated,” said Senate Intelligence Chairman Mark Warner. “I think there’s a level of seriousness given to this now that frankly was not there until Director Burns came and made this a priority.”

The Virginia Democrat said it was frustrating that after five years since these apparent attacks began occurring, there’s still difficulty in everything from taking care of those who have been injured to determining who is responsible and even what tools or weapons were used.For some victims of these strange incidents — some of whom are suffering from debilitating ongoing health problems — the government’s response has been equally frustrating.

Current and former officials say that during the Trump administration, individuals who reported experiencing these symptoms weren’t always believed.”

It took awhile for certain people to take it very serious,” said one official with direct knowledge of the incidents

Even now, officials who report these symptoms are closely screened to confirm whether their symptoms are physical or psychosomatic.”

The problem with the handful (of episodes) that I know have happened here in this country (is) the smoking gun,” said the official. “We don’t have the smoking gun.”

Israel Authorizes Organ Harvesting, Weapons-Testing on Palestinian Prisoners: Report IMEMC

Posted on March 24, 2019

“Palestinian spaces are laboratories,” Professor Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian said in a lecture at Columbia University.

Authorities of the Israeli occupation have permitted large pharmaceutical firms to carry out tests on Palestinian prisoners and has been testing weapons on Palestinian children, a professor with the Israeli Hebrew University said.

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Israeli Troops Kill 15-year-old Boy During Gaza Protests

Professor Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, a Palestinian feminist activist and the Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law, said she collected data while working on a research project for the university.

“Palestinian spaces are laboratories,” she said in her lecture titled, ‘Disturbing Spaces – Violent Technologies in Palestinian Jerusalem’ at Columbia University in New York City.

“The invention of products and services of state-sponsored security corporations are fueled by long-term curfews and Palestinian oppression by the Israeli army.”

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem distanced itself from her claims that Israel has been experimenting on Palestinian children with new weapons systems in order to boost the sale of international weapons.

Just weeks ago, Israeli authorities refused to hand over the body of prisoner Fares Baroud, who died in Israeli custody after suffering several illnesses including glaucoma and liver disease.

There are concern and speculation from family and activist site, Palestine Libre, that Baroud was a test subject.

In 2015, the Palestinian ambassador to the United Nations Riyad Mansour accused Israeli security forces of harvesting organs from the bodies of Palestinians killed.

“After returning the seized bodies of Palestinians killed by the occupying forces through October, and following medical examinations, it has been reported that the bodies were returned with missing corneas and other organs,” Mansour said

The Israeli ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon responded by rejecting the allegations, saying that the charges were anti-Semitic.

Danon wrote to the then Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “I call on you to repudiate this sinister accusation and to condemn the ongoing incitement by Palestinian leaders.”

As far back as 1997, the Israeli newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth reported on the comments of Dalia Itzik, chairwoman of a parliamentary committee, who acknowledged that the Israeli Ministry of Health granted permits to pharmaceutical companies to test their new drugs on prisoners, and noted that 5,000 tests had been carried out, IMEMC reported.

Titbits #301

The 60 year-old Palestinian Khairi Hannoun: “It’s a legitimate, entirely non-violent demonstration (protesting Israel’s confiscation of our land). We were walking. We didn’t think the soldiers would attack us. But we were wrong. They attacked us like hooligans. I’m 60, what can I do to an armed soldier? But for the officer there, I’m a threat and he attacked me brutally.”

Better be roughly right than precisely wrong. Being right has its source in a multidisciplinary path, especially practising and applying an experimental mind. on any design or project you undertake.

Covid-19 has resulted in an estimated 122,600 deaths in Africa since the onset of the pandemic. Malaria, a disease that is particularly prevalent and deadly in the continent, took more than 400,000 lives in 2019 alone. Not counting all the preventable diseases. that harvest millions. Apparently vaccines for malaria are being tested in Burkina Faso.

Immunizations: RNA-based vaccines work by instructing our cells to make the spike protein found on the SARS-CoV-2 virus, spooking the immune system into action. The biggest challenge in immunizing against HIV, tuberculosis, and the flu is that these pathogens have multiple proteins to code for, not just the one in SARS-CoV-2. With mRNA, it’s easy to include the code for several kinds of proteins in a single injection.

Cancer therapies: Cancer is caused by genetic code that’s gone haywire. The most sinister aspect of the disease is how it evades our immune systems. Personalized cancer vaccines would effectively lift cancer’s camouflage. These vaccines would introduce mRNA that codes for one of the unique proteins the cancer produces, called a neo-antigen, that the body could then recognize and attack. Instead of flooding the body with toxic chemicals that kill cells with abandon, cancer vaccines could target only the cancer itself.

Cures or treatments for genetic diseases: For more common rare diseases, a single treatment may work for multiple people. Nucleic acid therapies like ASOs and RNAs that can correct or silence errors in genetic code are a beacon of hope. mRNA won’t be just for rare orphan diseases, either; Ionis Pharmaceuticals has drugs in the pipeline for Alzheimer’s disease, cystic fibrosis, and Hepatitis B—all of which are relatively common—as well as a therapy that could treat high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.

New Japanese vending machines sell only edible insects. The nine options include deep-fried or dried crickets, locusts, and silkworm chrysalises.

Can you imagine Earth is devoid of birds? In the last 40 years, birds population decreased by 2/3, especially categories of birds that used to live in agricultural areas and swamps. Germany is encouraging peasants to leave a third of their lands without plowing and Not planted to let birds get this illusion that their natural environment exist and encourage their procration. Birds eat mostly insects that bread exponentially. Prussia Frederick 2 ordered that No birds should exist on the grounds of his palace “Sans Souci”

L’Italy, le soir les gens dans les rues, riant tout haut. Pas de cadavres ambulant de Londre (apres WWI), recroquevillés dans leur fauteuils roulants, les yeux fixés sur quelques vilaine fleurs piquées dans des pots.

Cette qualite de purete, d’intégrité du sentiment que seules les femmes éprouvent entre elles, juste sorties de l’adolescence?

Etre amoureuse? Etre absolument differente des autres

C’était fini entre eux. C’etait affreux. Et pourtant, le soleil répandait sa chaleur. Un jour s’ajoutait à un autre

Conduisons-nous le moin mal possible. Dans ce navire qui fait naufrage et que nous sommes une race condamnée. Decorons notre cachot, allégeons les maux de nos co-prisonniers. Faisons la partie plus dures à ces bandits de Dieux qui gâchent les vies humaines. Conduisons-nous avec Class.. Desormais, on fait le bien pour l’amour du bien?

Tout le monde qui a participé à une guerre a des amis chers qui se sont fait tuer à la guerre.

Tout le monde sacrifie quelque chose de chère en se mariant.

Septimus avit le trauma d’apres une guerre, il voyait des choses, entendait des sons, connaissait les pensées des gens, il savait le sens du monde….Il parlait à lui-même et a haute voix, même la musique était visible..et voulait se suicider, emportant avec lui un amie chère à lui

Scentsplorations” (How to link smell to creativity)? Anosmia (loss of the sense of smell)? With anosmia being a common symptom of Covid-19, more people are realizing how handicapped we’d be without the ability to detect smells in our environments. Prior to the pandemic, perhaps few would have found it entirely surprising that a majority of youths would rather lose their olfactory sense than give up their tech gadgets.

Ce serait chouette si quand on meurt, on pourrait s’étendre comme une brune entre les gens qu’on connaît le mieux: et entre les branches des arbres qui soulèvent la brume.

Personne n’a vu le visage de ce personnage derrière des fenêtres fumées de la voiture quand la voiture s’arrêta. Mais tout le monde sentait le visage d’une ‘Autorité publique”. Le mystère a effleuré les gens de son aile: le fantôme de la religion était en marche, les yeux bandés et la bouche grande ouverte…

Smell affects the quality of our lives in profound ways. Apart from known benefits like alerting us to danger or improving our appetites, paying attention to odors, it seems, also can bolster our creativity. Converts say developing our olfaction can make us think differently and even speak and write more vividly.

This morning, I slowly decided to spend the morning reading, in just a single book. It was a hard decision, unlike deciding to fast, I fully enjoyed my morning. By Noon, it is time to resume the daily routines of tasks.

La jalousie? Cette passion qui survit à toutes les autres passions. Si ces jalousies valent leurs prix d’Or pour se développer et devenir une personne meilleure!

It is a fact, universally acknowledged of human nature, that if you dangle a “badge of Honor“, while guaranteeing that the stomach will Not go hungry, everyone will work many folds harder to snatch this badge. Problem is that the Elite Classes who hoard all these “Secret Clubs” are very selective of the “candidates” competing for the Honor.

It goes without saying that our “stomach”, if guaranteed it will Not go hungry, is the same for all of us. The problem is that the Elite Classes never felt hungry or cared for any guarantee against starvation, were Not excited to think that all kids should have an Equal Start in life, in primary and secondary education and free lunches.

Every child should have an Equal Start in life: that is the primary job of fair government institutions: a guarantee against starvation, free primary and secondary education and free preventive health care.

“Émile” by Jean Jacques Rousseau (Book Review, part 1)

Note 1: Rousseau cherche à développer et préserver l’Individualité des enfants face aux forces des institutions qui veulent se servire de la personne pour leurs intérêts. Développer la force de l’individu dès ses premières années c’est la responsabilité de la mère.

I am reading “Emile” by J. J. Rousseau , published in the 18th century. He was persecuted and forced to exile for many years. This universal and timely book is applicable to all societies as to the proper development of kids and their education in their early age.

Je propose les idées que les gens ne croient pas faisable, dont la vérité ou la fausseté impose a connaître, et qui font le bonheur ou le malheur du genre humain.

Pere et mere, ce qui est faisable est ce que vous voulez faire, repeter le mal qui existe? Dois-je répondre de votre volonté?

Les lois, toujours si occupées des biens et si peu des personnes, parce qu’ elles ont pour objet la paix et non la veritu, ne donnent pas assez d’autorité aux mères, surtout les veuves, pour élever leurs enfants.

Presque tout le premier age des enfants est maladive et danger. La moitie perit avant l’age de 8. Les epreuves faites, l’enfant a gagne les forces necessaire pour poursuivre la vie.

(Je crois que les enfants des “nobles” périssent en plus grand nombre parce que la mère ne les allaitent pas et ne les entretien pas la plupart des journées. Et l’enfant vit plutôt en solitude et ne sentent pas l’amour et la tendress de leur parents)

La nature n’est pas les habitudes: la seve de la plante redirige la direction de la plante quand les forces extérieures cessent de s’appliquer sur elle.

La mere a la responsabilité de former de bonne heure une enceinte autour de l’âme de son enfant (protection, l’amour, jugement et respect de la nature…) et poser les barrieres. La société en peut marquer le circuit (les prejuges, l’autorite, les institutions…) qui vont submerge l’enfant et étouffe en lui la nature qui tu lui as préservé comme une jeune pousse…

La mere prend soin de sa plante par la culture: les homme et les institutions par” l’éducation.”

Les gens ne se souviennent pas pas de leur enfance: ils cherchent toujours l’homme dans l’enfant et leur transmettent les savoir des hommes.

Tel s’est fait enterrer a 100 ans qui mourut dès sa naissance: il n’a jamais vécu et agit de toutes ses senses.

L’homme civil nait, vit et meurt dans l’esclavage des institutions: A sa naissance on the coud dans un maillot, a sa mort on le cloue dans une bière. Tant qu’il garde la figure humaine, il est enchaine par nos institutions.

Le vent de tous ses catégories et la mer de toutes ses forces sont naturelles: Prend garde, jeune pilote du vaisseau, que ton cable ne file et que ton ancre ne laboure pour ne pas dériver. C’est ça l’éducation fondamentale quand on est jeté dans la société a composantes variantes.

L’homme urbain est une unité fractionnaire qui tient au denominateur commun, les lois civiles qui s’appliquent a tous: Ôter son existence absolu pour creer une nature relative dans l’unite commun.

Les Guerres des Républiques sont plus cruelles que celles des monarchies. Pourtant, la vie en paix dans une monarchie (et ses classes d’elites) est terrible comme sujet et pas comme citoyens.

Le combat de l’humanité est entre élever un homme ou un citoyen. Dans les deux cas, la majorité silencieuse a manque aux deux choix et entrave le développement des droits des hommes et la coopération entre les genres, les races et la liberté d’expression.

Note 2: It might take me a long time to finish “Emile”: For each page I read, I feel pressured to fill another page of notes and comments.

Denying the Demonic

by Edward Curtin / April 20th, 2021

As reported by David Talbot in The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of America’s Secret Government, when the staunch Catholic James Jesus Angleton was on his deathbed, he gave an interviews to visiting journalists, including Joseph Trento. 

James Jesus Angleton confessed:

He had not been serving God, after all, when he followed Allen Dulles.  He had been on a satanic quest….’Fundamentally, the founding fathers of U.S. intelligence were liars,’ he told Trento in an emotionless voice.  ‘The better you lied and the more you betrayed, the more likely you would be promoted…. Outside this duplicity, the only thing they had in common was a desire for absolute power.  I did things that, looking back on my life, I regret.  But I was part of it and loved being in it.’ 

James invoked the names of the high eminences who had run the CIA in his day – Dulles, Helms, Wisner. 

These men were ‘the grand masters,’ he said.  ‘If you were in a room with them, you were in a room full of people that you had to believe would deservedly end up in hell.’  Angleton took another slow sip from his steaming cup.  ‘I guess I will see them there soon.’

by Edward Curtin / April 20th, 2021

In March of last year as the coronavirus panic was starting, I wrote a somewhat flippant article saying that the obsession with buying and hoarding toilet paper was the people’s vaccine. 

My point was simple: excrement and death have long been associated in cultural history and in the Western imagination with the evil devil, Satan, the Lord of the underworld, the Trickster, the Grand Master who rules the pit of smelly death, the place below where bodies go.

The psychoanalytic literature is full of examples of death anxiety revealed in anal dreams of shit-filled overflowing toilets and people pissing in their pants.  Ernest Becker put it simply in The Denial of Death:

No mistake – the turd is mankind’s real threat because it reminds people of death.

The theological literature is also full of warnings about the devil’s wiles.  So too the Western classics from Aeschylus to Melville. The demonic has an ancient pedigree and has various names. Rational people tend to dismiss all this as superstitious nonsense.  This is hubris. 

The Furies always exact their revenge when their existence is denied.  For they are part of ourselves, not alien beings, as the tragedy of human history has shown us time and again.

Since excremental visions and the fear of death haunt humans – the skull at the banquet as William James put it – the perfect symbol of protection is toilet paper that will keep you safe and clean and free of any reminder of the fear of death running through a panicked world. 

It’s a magic trick, of course, an unconscious way of thinking you are protecting yourself; a form of self-hypnosis.

One year later, magical thinking has taken a different form and my earlier flippancy has turned darker. You can’t hoard today’s toilet paper but you can get them: RNA inoculations, misnamed vaccines.

People are lined up for them now as they are being told incessantly to “get your shot.”  (Mass pressures work on almost all people)

They are worse than toilet paper. At least toilet paper serves a practical function.  Real vaccines, as the word’s etymology – Latin, vaccinus, from cows, the cowpox virus vaccine first used by British physician Edward Jenner in 1800 to prevent smallpox – involve the use of a small amount of a virus. 

The RNA inoculations are not vaccines.  To say they are is bullshit and has nothing to do with cows. To call them vaccines is linguistic mind control.

These experimental inoculations do not prevent the vaccinated from getting infected with the “virus” Nor do they prevent transmission of the alleged virus.

When they were approved recently by the FDA that was made clear.  The FDA issued Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) for these inoculations only under the proviso that they may make an infection less severe. 

Yet millions have obediently taken a shot that doesn’t do what they think it does.  What does that tell us?

Hundreds of millions of people have taken an injection that allows a bio-reactive “gene-therapy” molecule to be injected into their bodies because of fear, ignorance, and a refusal to consider that the people who are promoting this are evil and have ulterior motives. 

Not that they mean well, but that they are evil and have evil intentions.  Does this sound too extreme?  Radically evil?  Come on!

So what drives the refusal to consider that demonic forces are at work with the corona crisis?

Why do the same people who get vaccinated believe that a PCR test that can’t, according to its inventor Kary Mullis, test for this so-called virus, believe in the fake numbers of positive “cases”?  Do these people even know if the virus has ever been isolated?

Such credulity is an act of faith, not science or confirmed fact.

Is it just the fear of death that drives such thinking?

Or is it something deeper than ignorance and propaganda that drives this incredulous belief?

If you want facts, I will not provide them here.

Despite the good intentions of people who still think facts matter, I don’t think most people are persuaded by facts anymore.

But such facts are readily available from excellent alternative media publications.  Global Research’s Michel Chossudovsky has released, free of charge, his comprehensive E-BookThe 2020-21 Worldwide Corona Crisis: Destroying Civil Society, Engineered Economic Depression, Global Coup D’Etat, and the “Great Reset.” 

 It’s a good place to start if facts and analysis are what you are after.

Or go to Robert Kennedy, Jr. Childrens Health Defense, Off-GuardianDissident VoiceGlobal Research, among numerous others.

Perhaps you think these sites are right-wing propaganda because many articles they publish can also be read or heard at some conservative media. If so, you need to start thinking rather than reacting.

The entire mainstream political/media spectrum is right-wing, if you wish to use useless terms such as Left/Right. 

I have spent my entire life being accused of being a left-wing nut, but now I am being told I am a right-wing nut, even though my writing appears in many leftist publications.

Perhaps my accusers don’t know which way the screw turns or the nut loosens.  Being uptight and frightened doesn’t help.

I am interested in asking why so many people can’t accept that radical evil is real.  Is that a right-wing question?  Of course not.  It’s a human question that has been asked down through the ages.

I do think we are today in the grip of radical evil, demonic forces. The refusal to see and accept this is not new. 

As the eminent theologian, David Ray Griffin, has argued, the American Empire, with its quest for world domination and its long and ongoing slaughters at home and abroad, is clearly demonic; it is driven by the forces of death symbolized by Satan.

I have spent many years trying to understand why so many good people have refused to see and accept this and have needed to ply a middle course over many decades.

The safe path.

Believing in the benevolence of their rulers.  When I say radical evil, I mean it in the deepest spiritual sense.  A religious sense, if you prefer. 

But by religious I don’t mean institutional religions since so many of the institutional religions are complicit in the evil.

It has long been easy for Americans to accept the demonic nature of foreign leaders such as Hitler, Stalin, or Mao.  Easy, also, to accept the government’s attribution of such names as the “new Hitler” to any foreign leader it wishes to kill and overthrow.  But to consider their own political leaders as demonic is near impossible.

So let me begin with a few reminders.

The U.S. destruction of Iraq and the mass killings of Iraqis under George W. Bush beginning in 2003.  Many will say it was illegal, unjust, carried out under false pretenses, etc.  But who will say it was pure evil?

Who will say that Barack Obama’s annihilation of Libya was radical evil?

Who will say the atomic destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the firebombing of Tokyo and so many Japanese cities that killed hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians was radical evil?

Who will say the U.S. war against Syria is demonic evil?

Who will say the killing of millions of Vietnamese was radical evil?

Who will say the insider attacks of September 11, 2001 were demonic evil?

Who will say slavery, the genocide of native people, the secret medical experiments on the vulnerable, the CIA mind control experiments, the coups engineered throughout the world resulting in the mass murder of millions – who will say these are evil in the deepest sense?

Who will say the U.S. security state’s assassinations of JFK, Malcolm X, MLK, Jr., Robert Kennedy, Fred Hampton, et al. were radical evil?

Who will say the $trillions spent on nuclear weapons and the willingness to use them to annihilate the human race is not the ultimate in radical evil?

This list could extend down the page endlessly. 

Only someone devoid of all historical sense could conclude that the U.S. has not been in the grip of demonic forces for a long time.

If you can do addition, you will find the totals staggering.  They are overwhelming in their implications.

But to accept this history as radically evil in intent and Not just in its consequences are two different things. 

I think so many find it so hard to admit that their leaders have intentionally done and do demonic deeds for two reasons. 

First, to do so implicates those who have supported these people or have not opposed them. It means they have accepted such radical evil and bear responsibility. 

It elicits feelings of guilt.

Secondly, to believe that one’s own leaders are evil is next to impossible for many to accept because it suggests that the rational façade of society is a cover for sinister forces and that they live in a society of lies so vast the best option is to make believe it just isn’t so. 

Even when one can accept that evil deeds were committed in the past, even some perhaps intentionally, the tendency is to say “that was then, but things are different now.

Grasping the present when you are in it is Not only difficult but often disturbing for it involves us.

So if I am correct and most Americans cannot accept that their leaders have intentionally done radically evil things, then it follows that to even consider questioning the intentions of the authorities regarding the current corona crisis needs to be self-censored. 

Additionally, as we all know, the authorities have undertaken a vast censorship operation so people cannot hear dissenting voices of those who have now been officially branded as domestic terrorists. The self-censorship and the official work in tandem.

There is so much information available that shows that the authorities at the World Health Organization, the CDC, The World Economic Forum, Big Pharma, governments throughout the world, etc. have gamed this crisis beforehand, have manipulated the numbers, lied, have conducted a massive fear propaganda campaign via their media mouthpieces, have imposed cruel lockdowns that have further enriched the wealthiest and economically and psychologically devastated vast numbers, etc. 

Little research is needed to see this, to understand that Big Pharma is, as Dr. Peter Gøtzsche documented eight years ago in Deadly Medicines and Organized Crime: How Big Pharma Has Corrupted Healthcare, a world-wide criminal enterprise. 

It takes but a few minutes to see that the pharmaceutical companies who have been given emergency authorization for these untested experimental non-vaccine “vaccines” have paid out billions of dollars to settle criminal and civil allegations.

It is an open secret that the WHO, the Gates Foundation, the WEF led by Klaus Schwab, and an interlocking international group of conspirators have plans for what they call The Great Reset, a strategy to use  the COVID-19 crisis to push their agenda to create a world of cyborgs living in cyberspace where artificial intelligence replaces people and human biology is wedded to technology under the control of the elites. 

They have made it very clear that there are too many people on this planet and billions must die.  Details are readily available of this open conspiracy to create a transhuman world.

Is this not radical evil?  Demonic?

Let me end with an analogy. 

There is another organized crime outfit that can only be called demonic – The Central Intelligence Agency. 

One of its legendary officers was James Jesus Angleton, chief of Counterintelligence from 1954 until 1975.  He was a close associate of Allen Dulles, the longest serving director of the CIA. 

Both men were deeply involved in many evil deeds, including bringing Nazi doctors and scientists into the U.S. to do the CIA’s dirty work, including mind control, bioweapons research, etc.  The stuff they did for Hitler. 

Until we recognize the demonic nature of the hell we are now in, we too will be lost.  We are fighting for our lives and the spiritual salvation of the world. 

Do not succumb to the siren songs of these fathers of lies.

Resist.

Ready or not, we need to start talking about menopause in the workplace

By Lisa DeShantz-Cook. Senior editor, ThinkHR. May 3, 2021. (Borrowed from Quartz with a few editing)

What is menopause anyway?

Speaking of menopause and its precursor perimenopause aloud can clear a room.

While everyone knows it’s something we have to deal with, no one wants to actually talk about it—especially Not in the workplace, and certainly not in mixed company.

But in this era of bringing our whole selves to work (whether that’s in the physical presence of our coworkers or from our home workspaces), it’s high time we introduced the topic.

Menopause, meet the workplace. Workplace, say hello to menopause.

Employers are okay discussing and making accommodations for pregnancy and breastfeeding, but menopause seems somehow different, a workplace taboo best swept under the proverbial carpet. As a result, they’re missing opportunities to support us.

What is menopause?

Menopause isn’t just a time when we stop having periods. A whole host of symptoms related to menopause can affect us in our 40s, 50s, and into our 60s.

These symptoms include hot flashes, cognitive changes, sleep issues, depression, anxiety, stress and burnout, to name just a few.

Mind you that Menopause can occur earlier due to certain health conditions, surgery, or chemotherapy.

My own experience with menopause just happened to coincide with a worldwide pandemic. With work travel effectively shut down, I could suffer symptoms over video meetings, where luckily my co-workers were unlikely to notice my pounding heart and shirt-soaking hot flashes.

Experiencing the indignities alone in my home office, and being able to shut off my video camera to run outside, is a luxury many of my friends aren’t afforded.

When menopause arrives, we may be at an age where we may have more time to devote to work or other interests now that children may be off to college or grown and gone.

We might also have fewer responsibilities outside of work, so more time to dedicate to work, education, certification, or other interests.

Conversely, menopause can happen when we have even more demands—like caring for older or ill parents or family members—on top of other family stressors.

Menopause can be a cruel twist in a life that might just be hitting its stride or yet another challenge on top of an overfilled plate.

If you’re in it, you know. You’ve probably raced into a meeting and gotten situated at the table, only to be overtaken by the internal fire that signifies an oncoming hot flash—and had to race for the door.

Your co-workers might be confused by your constant fanning, or your need for dressing in umpteen layers and peeling them off at seemingly random times. You might have snapped at someone for little reason or pushed past someone in the hallway in a rush for fresh air.

Worse still is the brain fog.

Routine tasks might get hazy, or you may have forgotten where you were in the middle of a meeting or presentation, or dropped the ball on your part of a team project. These slips can be brutal to your ego, but if you’re supported in the workplace, they don’t have to derail your career.

How employers can support women going through menopause

Menopause does affect the workforce—recent studies show 20% of the current workforce is experiencing it—so employers should acknowledge it.

Here’s how they can begin:

  • First and foremost, actively work to demystify and destigmatize this very normal life phase.
  • Encourage open and honest discussion about menopause and its side effects. Acknowledging that symptoms can be both emotionally and physically challenging can go a long way.
  • Build policies that help us feel supported in all phases of our work life, and facilitate conversations that help co-workers and managers understand when support and understanding is needed.
  • Create a safe space for us to express our needs to managers and supervisors, such as flexible hours if sleep is being interrupted, access to fresh air during the workday, proximity to bathrooms, or breaks in meetings. Our having to say “I’m having a hot flash and need to step away” shouldn’t be met with ridicule, shame, or personal questions.
  • Make room for menopause in workplace health programs.
  • Is there a place to get information on menopause for those experiencing it or those wishing to provide support? Does the employee assistance program (EAP) offer guidance? Do health and wellness talks include information about menopause?
  • Educate managers on menopause, symptoms, accommodations, and appropriate support, and teach them what they can do to keep their employees experiencing menopause symptoms engaged, productive, challenged, and feeling valued.

If those of us experiencing menopause aren’t acknowledged and supported by workplace policies and initiatives, we’ll feel alienated, invisible, less valued, and may bow out of the workforce well before we’re ready, taking with us valuable wisdom and experience.

Support from company leaders, openness and efforts to destigmatize menopause in the workplace, and employer policies and programs that support our health at all ages benefit everyone.

Ode to faithful older organs

My older heart, liver, kidneys…older brain.., cooler blood, slower nerves are still functional, but Not making it easier on me to enjoy life.

You older guys are Not dumb, by any stretch of the imagination: You are my emotional intelligence.

Many emotions I have yet to discover, emotions that I still fail to grasp and make sense of. Emotions that I try hard to develop and share, but No taker for any kind of encouragement

You guys are the most talented and professional of hard workers, and yet you continuously communicate, coordinate, and share your conditions among the entire team of professionals

If under the weather, the team knows and share your plight.

One for all, and all for one in its best behavior, and Not needing to swear on any oth, Not that I am consciously aware of or discussed your wishes and demands with you.

You guys have Not been giving me hell for a long period: No pains, no allergies, no side effects, no need for medication…

Still, you guys are forcing to question myself: “What’s wrong with me? How you managed to survive for so long? For what purpose?”

You guys love your tedious and consistent jobs, and are Not willing to stop on my order.

Don’t count on me to give you any hint that your retirement might be sooner than expected.

Many years ago, I learned never to promise anything to anyone, and I stuck with this decision. Those exploiters of your candid spirit.

I don’t recall asking consciously of you guys to promise me anything. And you never demanded any promises from my part, Not consciously.

You guys did doggedly what you do best and consistently, total loyalty from totally skilled professionals, to a totally mindless creature.

I think I have taken good care of you guys lately, except the lungs: Still a smoker, for reasons that makes no sense, so far.

You guys have been doing a great job, a well done job.

You guys got used to slave for a stupid creature like me, a person who kept refusing to thank you for your tireless toil, and blaming you for my reckless behaviors in my youth, for your failures.

You allowed me to survive for so long, against all odds, and I still can’t figure out how should I share your mysterious working with others.

Never mind, all you guys need is a simple gratitude to consciously care for you and let your work diligently and delaying your retirement.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

August 2021
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