Adonis Diaries

Archive for the ‘medicine/medical treatment’ Category

This article was posted in October 2014 by Ricken Patel. Just a reminder of our Covid-19 pandemics and how the world community is fighting it.

Ebola, Covid-19…: Pandemics vs People

Ebola could threaten us all, and the most urgent need to stop it is for volunteers.
If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone. Other volunteers – in health, sanitation, logistics – can help too.
This is a call to serve humanity in the deepest possible way, to accept serious risk for our fellow human beings.

Three weeks ago, hundreds of thousands of us went offline to fight climate change. This week, we’re going offline to help stop Ebola.

The Ebola virus is spiraling out of control. Cases in West Africa are doubling every 2-3 weeks and the latest estimate says that up to 1.4 million people could be infected by mid-January.

Talking about exponential growth is frightening

At that scale, this monster threatens the entire world.

I just read that the UN has only $100,000 in its fund for the Ebola outbreak

Mind you that AIDS harvest over 1.5 million each year (as much as Malaria and Dysentery combined).

Though, malaria is the number one disease followed by dysentery that put heavy burden on the States in Africa and Equatorial countries.

Previous Ebola outbreaks have been repeatedly contained at small numbers. But the scale of this epidemic has swamped the region’s weak health systems.

Liberia has less than 1 doctor for every 100,000 people. Governments are providing funds, but there just aren’t enough medical staff to stem the epidemic.

That’s where we come in.

If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone.

Other volunteers can help too — lab technicians, logisticians, water and sanitation workers, and transport workers. Volunteering means more than time. It means risk.

Health professionals have already died fighting Ebola.

But if there’s any group of people that would consider taking this risk for their fellow human beings, it’s our community.

Great things come from listening to the deepest voices within us.

If you’re a health professional, or have other skills that can help, I ask you to take a moment, listen to the part of you that you most trust, and follow it.

Raising your hand to volunteer is the first step.

You’ll need to get, and provide, a lot of information to ensure you’re well matched to an available position. You will likely need to discuss this decision with your loved ones, and you can withdraw from the process later if you choose to.

For this effort, Avaaz is working with Partners In Health, Save the Children, and International Medical Corps, three of the leading organisations fighting this deadly disease.

We are also consulting with the governments of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, and the World Health Organization.

While there is substantial risk, there are also clear ways to contain that risk. 

Ebola is spread through bodily fluids, so with extreme care, the risk of contracting it can be minimized.

So far, 94 health care workers have died of Ebola in Liberia, but almost all of them have been national health workers, who are far less well equipped than international volunteers. 

With treatment, the chances of surviving the virus are better than 50%.

Many of us, from police to activists to soldiers, have jobs that involve risking our lives for our country.

It’s the most powerful statement we can make about what’s worth living for. Taking this risk to fight Ebola, makes a statement that our fellow human beings, wherever they are, are worth living for:

If Ebola spirals further out of control, it could soon threaten us all. The fact that a weak health care system in a small country can let this monster grow to a size that threatens the world is a powerful statement of just how interdependent we are. But this interdependence is far more than just interests.

We are connected, all of us, in a community of human beings.

All the lies that have divided us – about nation and religion and sexuality – are being torn down, and we are realizing that we really are one people, one tribe. 

That a young mother and her daughter in Liberia fear the same things and love the same things as a young mother and her daughter in Brazil, or the Netherlands.

And in this unfolding understanding, a new world is being born.

Out of the darkest places come our brightest lights.

Out of the depths of the Ebola nightmare, let’s bring the hope of a new world of one people, willing to give, and sacrifice, for each other.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, John, Alice, Danny, and the whole Avaaz team.

Note:  See the video

Fighting Ebola street by street

Good people are all around the globe! Disasters too –

Thanks Ben C. Solomon for this great video about ‪#‎ebola‬ –
Sean Casey makes me think of u and all the great work u and ur colleagues are doing!http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/africa/100000003161313/fighting-ebola-outbreak-street-by-street.html?playlistId=100000003105684&region=video-grid&version=video-grid-headline&contentCollection=Ebola+Outbreak&contentPlacement=0&module=featured-videos&action=click&pgType=Multimedia&eventName=video-grid-click

More information:

Up to 1.4m people could be infected with Ebola by January, CDC warns (The Guardian)
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/sep/23/ebola-cdc-millions-infected-quarantine-africa-epidemi…

Known Cases and Outbreaks of Ebola Virus Disease, in Chronological Order (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/history/chronology.html

Ebola ‘devouring everything in its path’ (Al Jazeera)
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2014/09/ebola-devouring-everything-path-201499161646914388.html

Ebola death rates 70% – WHO study (BBC)
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29327741

Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola (WHO)
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/ebola/25-august-2014/en/

Iraqi Birth Defects: Usage of depleted uranium shells for years

I watched a documentary on the cable ARTE yesterday on the birth defects suffered by babies in Iraq after the US invasion of 2003.

And today Hot Posts is disseminating what Rania Khalek wrote. This is a reblog with minor editing. 

Rania Khalek posted on March 20, 2013 in her blog “Dispatches from the underclass”

The United States may have finished dropping bombs on Iraq, but Iraqi bodies and babies will be dealing with the consequences for generations to come in the form of birth defects, mysterious illnesses and skyrocketing cancer rates.

Al Jazeera’s Dahr Jamail reports that contamination from U.S. weapons, particularly Depleted Uranium (DU) munitions, has led to an Iraqi health crisis of epic proportions.

Children being born with two heads, children born with only one eye, multiple tumors  disfiguring facial and body deformities, and complex nervous system problems…” are just some of the congenital birth defects being linked to military-related pollution.

In certain Iraqi cities, the health consequences are significantly worse than those seen in the aftermath of the atomic bombing of Japan at the end of WWII.

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera])

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera])

The highest rates are in the city of Fallujah, which underwent two massive US bombing campaigns in 2004.

Though the U.S. initially denied it, officials later admitted using white phosphorus (like what Israel used on Gaza).

In addition, U.S. and British forces unleashed an estimated 2,000 tons of depleted uranium ammunition in populated Iraqi cities in 2003.

DU, a chemically toxic heavy metal produced in nuclear waste, is used in weapons due to its ability to pierce through armor.

That’s why the US and UK were among a handful of nations (France and Israel) who in December refused to sign an international agreement to limit its use, insisting DU is not harmful, science be damned.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon’s refusal to release details about where DU munitions were fired has made it difficult to clean up.

Today, 14.7% of Fallujah’s babies are born with a birth defect, 14 times the documented rate in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Fallujah’s babies have also experienced heart defects 13 times the European rate and nervous system defects 33 times that of Europe.

That comes on top of a 12-fold rise in childhood cancer rates since 2004.

The male-to-female birth ratio is now 86 boys for every 100 girls, indicating genetic damage that affects males more than females.

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

(Dr Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

(On a side note, these pictures are rather sanitized compared to other even more difficult to look at images. See here if you can bear it.)

If Fallujah is the Iraqi Hiroshima, then Basra is its Nagasaki counterpart.

According to a study published in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a professional journal based in the southwestern German city of Heidelberg, there was a 7 fold increase in the number of birth defects in Basra between 1994 and 2003.

According to the Heidelberg study, the concentration of lead in the milk teeth of sick children from Basra was almost 3 times as high as comparable values in areas where there was no fighting.

In addition, never before has such a high rate of neural tube defects (“open back”) been recorded in babies as in Basra, and the rate continues to rise. According to the study, the number of hydrocephalus (“water on the brain”) cases among new-born is 6 times as high in Basra as it is in the United States.

These phenomenon are not isolated to Fallujah and Basra. The overall Iraqi cancer rate has also skyrocketed:

Official Iraqi government statistics show that, prior to the outbreak of the First Gulf War in 1991, the rate of cancer cases in Iraq was 40 out of 100,000 people.

By 1995, it had increased to 800 out of 100,000 people, and, by 2005, it had doubled to at least 1,600 out of 100,000 people. Current estimates show the increasing trend continuing.

As Grist’s Susie Cagle points out, “That’s potentially a more than 4,000% increase in the cancer rate, making it more than 500 percent higher than the cancer rate in the U.S.

Dr. Mozghan Savabieasfahani, an environmental toxicologist based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, told Jamail that “These observations collectively suggest an extraordinary public health emergency in Iraq. Such a crisis requires urgent multifaceted international action to prevent further damage to public health.”(

Dr. Samira Alani/Al Jazeera)

Instead, the international community, including the nation most responsible for the health crisis is mostly ignoring the problem.

To make matters worse, Iraq’s healthcare system, which was once the envy of the region, is virtually nonexistent due to the mass exodus of Iraq’s medical doctors since 2003.

According to recent estimates, there are currently fewer than 100 psychiatrists and 20,0000 physicians serving a population of 31 million Iraqis.

Dahr Jamail was on Democracy Now this morning discussing the horrific effects of military-related pollution in Iraq:

Yanar Mohammad, President of the Organization for Women’s Freedom in Iraq was also on Democracy Now and addressed the toxic legacy of birth defects in Iraq. (I interviewed Mohammed for a piece I wrote for Muftah about the deterioration of Iraqi women’s rights since the invasion, which you can read here.

)https://www.youtube.com/embed/5eBgRcgLNW0?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent 

How childhood trauma seriously affects health across a lifetime?

In the mid-’90s, the CDC and Kaiser Permanente discovered an exposure that dramatically increased the risk for 7 out of 10 of the leading causes of death in the United States.

In high doses (of  childhood trauma ), it affects brain development, the immune system, hormonal systems, and even the way our DNA is read and transcribed.

Folks who are exposed in very high doses have triple the lifetime risk of heart disease and lung cancer and a 20-year difference in life expectancy.

And yet, doctors today are not trained in routine screening or treatment. 

The exposure I’m talking about is not a pesticide or a packaging chemical. It’s childhood trauma.

By Nadine Burke Harris

Patsy Z and TEDxSKE shared a link.

What kind of trauma am I talking about here? I’m not talking about failing a test or losing a basketball game. 

I am talking about threats that are so severe or pervasive that they literally get under our skin and change our physiology: things like abuse, neglect, or growing up with a parent who struggles with mental illness or substance dependence.  (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)

For a long time, I viewed these things in the way I was trained to view them, either as a social problem — refer to social services — or as a mental health problem — refer to mental health services.

And then something happened to make me rethink my entire approach.

When I finished my residency, I wanted to go someplace where I felt really needed, someplace where I could make a difference. So I came to work for California Pacific Medical Center, one of the best private hospitals in Northern California.

 Together, we opened a clinic in Bayview-Hunters Point, one of the poorest, most underserved neighborhoods in San Francisco.

Prior to that point, there had been only one pediatrician in all of Bayview to serve more than 10,000 children, so we hung a shingle, and we were able to provide top-quality care regardless of ability to pay. It was so cool.

We targeted the typical health disparities: access to care, immunization rates, asthma hospitalization rates, and we hit all of our numbers. We felt very proud of ourselves.

And I started noticing a disturbing trend. A lot of kids were being referred to me for ADHD, or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, but when I actually did a thorough history and physical, what I found was that for most of my patients, I couldn’t make a diagnosis of ADHD.

Most of the kids I was seeing had experienced such severe trauma that it felt like something else was going on. Somehow I was missing something important.

Before I did my residency, I did a master’s degree in public health, and one of the things that they teach you in public health school is that if you’re a doctor and you see 100 kids that all drink from the same well, and 98 of them develop diarrhea, you can go ahead and write that prescription for dose after dose after dose of antibiotics, or you can walk over and say, “What the hell is in this well?”

So I began reading everything that I could get my hands on about how exposure to adversity affects the developing brains and bodies of children.

And then one day, my colleague walked into my office, and he said, “Dr. Burke, have you seen this?” In his hand was a copy of a research study called the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.

That day changed my clinical practice and ultimately my career.

 The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study is something that everybody needs to know about. It was done by Dr. Vince Felitti at Kaiser and Dr. Bob Anda at the CDC. Together, they asked 17,500 adults about their history of exposure to what they called “adverse childhood experiences,” or ACEs.

Those include physical, emotional, or sexual abuse; physical or emotional neglect; parental mental illness, substance dependence, incarceration; parental separation or divorce; or domestic violence.

For every yes, you would get a point on your ACE score. And then what they did was they correlated these ACE scores against health outcomes. What they found was striking.

Two things:

Number one, ACEs are incredibly common. 67% of the population had at least one ACE, and 12.6%, one in eight, had four or more ACEs.

The second thing that they found was that there was a dose-response relationship between ACEs and health outcomes: the higher your ACE score, the worse your health outcomes.

For a person with an ACE score of four or more, their relative risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was two and a half times that of someone with an ACE score of zero.

For hepatitis, it was also two and a half times. For depression, it was four and a half times.

For suicide tendency, it was 12 times.

A person with an ACE score of 7 or more had triple the lifetime risk of lung cancer and three and a half times the risk of ischemic heart disease, the number one killer in the United States of America.

This makes sense.

Some people looked at this data and they said, “Come on. You have a rough childhood, you’re more likely to drink and smoke and do all these things that are going to ruin your health. This isn’t science. This is just bad behavior.”

It turns out this is exactly where the science comes in.

We now understand better than we ever have before how exposure to early adversity affects the developing brains and bodies of children.

1. It affects areas like the nucleus accumbens, the pleasure and reward center of the brain that is implicated in substance dependence.

2. It inhibits the prefrontal cortex, which is necessary for impulse control and executive function, a critical area for learning.

3. And on MRI scans, we see measurable differences in the amygdala, the brain’s fear response center.

So there are real neurologic reasons why folks exposed to high doses of adversity are more likely to engage in high-risk behavior, and that’s important to know.

But it turns out that even if you don’t engage in any high-risk behavior, you’re still more likely to develop heart disease or cancer. 

The reason for this has to do with the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, the brain’s and body’s stress response system that governs our fight-or-flight response.

How does it work? Well, imagine you’re walking in the forest and you see a bear. Immediately, your hypothalamus sends a signal to your pituitary, which sends a signal to your adrenal gland that says, “Release stress hormones! Adrenaline! Cortisol!” 

And so your heart starts to pound, your pupils dilate, your airways open up, and you are ready to either fight that bear or run from the bear.

That is wonderful if you’re in a forest and there’s a bear. (Laughter) But the problem is what happens when the bear comes home every night, and this system is activated over and over and over again, and it goes from being adaptive, or life-saving, to maladaptive, or health-damaging?

Children are especially sensitive to this repeated stress activation, because their brains and bodies are just developing. 

High doses of adversity not only affect brain structure and function, they affect the developing immune system, developing hormonal systems, and even the way our DNA is read and transcribed.

For me, this information threw my old training out the window, because when we understand the mechanism of a disease, when we know not only which pathways are disrupted, but how, then as doctors, it is our job to use this science for prevention and treatment. That’s what we do.

So in San Francisco, we created the Center for Youth Wellness to prevent, screen and heal the impacts of ACEs and toxic stress.

We started simply with routine screening of every one of our kids at their regular physical, because I know that :

1. if my patient has an ACE score of 4, she’s two and a half times as likely to develop hepatitis or COPD, she’s four and half times as likely to become depressed, and she’s 12 times as likely to attempt to take her own life as my patient with zero ACEs.

2. I know that when she’s in my exam room.

For our patients who do screen positive, we have a multidisciplinary treatment team that works to reduce the dose of adversity and treat symptoms using best practices, including home visits, care coordination, mental health care, nutrition, holistic interventions, and yes, medication when necessary.

But we also educate parents about the impacts of ACEs and toxic stress the same way you would for covering electrical outlets, or lead poisoning, and we tailor the care of our asthmatics and our diabetics in a way that recognizes that they may need more aggressive treatment, given the changes to their hormonal and immune systems.

So the other thing that happens when you understand this science is that you want to shout it from the rooftops, because this isn’t just an issue for kids in Bayview.

I figured the minute that everybody else heard about this, it would be routine screening, multi-disciplinary treatment teams, and it would be a race to the most effective clinical treatment protocols.

Yeah. That did not happen. And that was a huge learning for me.

What I had thought of as simply best clinical practice I now understand to be a movement.

In the words of Dr. Robert Block, the former President of the American Academy of Pediatrics, “Adverse childhood experiences are the single greatest unaddressed public health threat facing our nation today.”

And for a lot of people, that’s a terrifying prospect. The scope and scale of the problem seems so large that it feels overwhelming to think about how we might approach it.

But for me, that’s actually where the hopes lies, because when we have the right framework, when we recognize this to be a public health crisis, then we can begin to use the right tool kit to come up with solutions.

From tobacco to lead poisoning to HIV/AIDS, the United States actually has quite a strong track record with addressing public health problems, but replicating those successes with ACEs and toxic stress is going to take determination and commitment, and when I look at what our nation’s response has been so far, I wonder, why haven’t we taken this more seriously?

At first I thought that we marginalized the issue because it doesn’t apply to us. That’s an issue for those kids in those neighborhoods. Which is weird, because the data doesn’t bear that out.

The original ACEs study was done in a population that was 70 percent Caucasian, 70% college-educated.

But then, the more I talked to folks, I’m beginning to think that maybe I had it completely backwards. If I were to ask how many people in this room grew up with a family member who suffered from mental illness, I bet a few hands would go up.

And then if I were to ask how many folks had a parent who maybe drank too much, or who really believed that if you spare the rod, you spoil the child, I bet a few more hands would go up.

Even in this room, this is an issue that touches many of us, and I am beginning to believe that we marginalize the issue because it does apply to us. Maybe it’s easier to see in other zip codes because we don’t want to look at it. We’d rather be sick.

 Fortunately, scientific advances and, frankly, economic realities make that option less viable every day. The science is clear: Early adversity dramatically affects health across a lifetime.

Today, we are beginning to understand how to interrupt the progression from early adversity to disease and early death, and 30 years.

From now, the child who has a high ACE score and whose behavioral symptoms go unrecognized, whose asthma management is not connected, and who goes on to develop high blood pressure and early heart disease or cancer will be just as anomalous as a six-month mortality from HIV/AIDS.

People will look at that situation and say, “What the heck happened there?” This is treatable. This is beatable. The single most important thing that we need today is the courage to look this problem in the face and say, this is real and this is all of us. I believe that

Is it the less information the better in critical split-second decision cases?

ER of Cook County Hospital (Chicago) on West Harriston Street, close to downtown, was built at the turn of last century.

I was home of the world’s first blood bank, cobalt-beam therapy, surgeons attaching severed fingers, famous trauma center for gangs’ gunshot wounds and injuries…and most famous for the TV series ER, and George Clooney

In the mid 90’s. the ER welcomed 250,000 patients a year, mostly homeless and health non-insured patients…

Smart patients would come the first thing in the morning to the ER and pack a lunch and a dinner.  Long lines crowded the walls of the cavernous corridors…

There were no air-conditioners: During the summer heat waves, the heat index inside the hospital reached 120 degrees. 

An administrator didn’t last 8 seconds in the middle of one of the wards.

There were no private rooms and patients were separated by plywood dividers.

There were no cafeteria or private phones: The single public phone was at the end of the hall.

One bathroom served all that crowd of patients.

There was a single light switch: You wanted to light a room and the entire hospital had to light up…

The big air fans, the radios and TV that patients brought with them (to keep company), the nurses’ bell buzzing non-stop and no free nurses around… rendered the ER a crazy place to treat emergency cases

Asthma cases were numerous: Chicago was the world worst in patients suffering from asthma…

Protocols had to be created to efficiently treat asthma cases, chest pain cases, homeless patients…

About 30 patients a day converged to the ER complaining of chest pains (potential heart attack worries) and there were only 20 beds in two wards for these cases.

It cost $2,000 a night per bed for serious intensive care, and about $1,000 for the lesser care (nurses instead of cardiologists tending to the chest pain patient…)

A third ward was created as observation unit for half a day patients.  

Was there any rational protocol to decide in which ward the chest-pain patient should be allocated to?

It was the attending physician call, and most of the decisions were wrong, except for the most obvious heart attack cases…

In the 70’s, cardiologist Lee Goldman borrowed the statistical rules of a group of mathematicians for telling apart subatomic particles. Goldman fed a computer data of hundreds of files of heart attack cases and crunched the numbers into a “predictive equation” or model.

Four key risk factors emerged as the most critical telltale of a real heart attack case:

1. ECG (the ancient electrocardiogram graph) showing acute ischemia

2. unstable angina pain

3, fluid in the lungs

4. systolic blood pressure under 100…

decision tree was fine-tuned to decide on serious cases. For example:

1. ECG is normal but at least two key risk factors are positive

2. ECG is abnormal with at leat one risk factor positive…

These kinds of decision trees… (The early artificial programs)

The trouble was that physicians insisted on letting discriminating factors muddle their decisions. For example, statistics had shown that “normally” females do not suffer heart attack until old age, and thus a young female might be sent home (and die the same night) more often than middle-aged black or older white males patients…

Brendan Reilly, chairman of the hospital department of Medicine, decided to try Goldman decision tree.  Physicians were to try the tree and their own instincts for a period.  The results were overwhelmingly in favor of the Goldman algorithm…

It turned out that, if the physician was not bombarded with dozens of pieces of intelligence and just followed the decision tree, he was better off in the allocation to ward process…

For example, a nurse should record all the necessary information of the patients (smoker, age, gender, overweight, job stress, physical activities, high blood pressure, blood sugar content, family history for heart attacks, sweating tendencies, prior heart surgeries,…), but the attending physician must receive quickly the results of the 4 key risk factors to decide on…

Basically, the physician could allocate the patient to the proper ward without even seeing the individual and be influenced by extraneous pieces of intelligence that are not serious today, but could be potential hazards later on or even tomorrow…

Mind you that in order to save on medical malpractice suits, physicians and nurses treating a patient must Not send the patient any signals that can be captured as “contempt”, like feeling invisible and insignificant  https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2012/07/26/what-type-of-hated-surgeons-gets-harassed-with-legal-malpractice-suits/

Many factors are potential predictors for heart attack cases, but they are minor today, for quick decisions…

No need to overwhelm with irrelevant information at critical time.  Analytic reasoning and snap judgment are neither good or bad: Either method is bad at the inappropriate circumstances.

In the “battle field” the less the information coming in, the less the communication streams and the better the rapid cognition decisions of field commanders…

All you need to know is the “forecast” and not the numbers of temperature, wind speed, barometric pressure…

Note: post inspired from a chapter in “Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell

10 – Eye Exercises – Increase The Power of Your Optic Muscles

From allaboutcf.  July 29, 2020

The eyes contain lots of small muscles, and there is no doubt that eye workouts can do little damage to your eyes, but can they really be of benefit?

Dr William Bates, developed a series of eye exercises at the beginning of the century to enhance vision without turning to lenses or surgery.

Dr Bates felt that many eye problems had their origin in stress, stress and laziness of the eye and he thought that because of these causes, the eyes could be treated without correction such as lenses, eyeglasses or perhaps surgical treatment.

Dr Bates’ theory focused on the concept that the muscles of the eye became fixed on a scene triggering stress to the eyes. Dr Bates felt that the eyes could be re-trained to relax and improve the link between the optic nerves and the brain.

Many people around the globe have claimed enhancements simply put sight, long sight, astigmatism, squints and lazy eyes utilizing these techniques.

Even children are able to practice the workouts and individuals with normal vision might improve concentration, reading abilities and co-ordination by following the regimens suggested by Dr Bates.

In essence, you can expect to perform some basic exercises for about half an hour a day

These can include a few of the following:-.

‘Palming.’.
To rest and relax your eyes, sit easily in front of a table, resting your elbows on a stack of cushions high enough to bring your palms quickly to your eyes without stooping forward or looking up. Close your eyes and cover them with your cupped palms to omit light, avoiding pressure on the sockets.

– ‘Swinging.’.
Unwind and keep the eyes mobile. Blinking cleans and lubricates the eyes, which is especially important if you invest a lot of time in front of a computer.

Select a colour and look out for it throughout the day. When you see it, be conscious of the colour rather than the kind.

See Plainly Approach.
==================.

The See Plainly Method is another popular series of exercises and training to help with vision correction. To the Bates’ technique, you are required to do 30 minutes of eye works out a day to enhance and boost the flexibility of the eye’s muscles.

This would usually involve making the eye change it’s focus from near to far. One easy method of doing this would be to hold a little item in your hand and slowly move it away from your face, making sure that your eye follows the things and maintains focus upon it.

One exercise which is referred to as “tromboning” has you hold a small object again, starting at arm’s length. Then you need to breath in and move the object slowly more detailed to your face, until it touches your nose. You are then required to breath out, taking a look at the item as you again move it away from your face.

Hence the idea of “Tromboning”.

The See Clearly Method also utilizes a variety of methods which are targeted at speeding up progress or enhancement.

There is a technique referred to as the “blur reading” technique, which asks you to turn a magazine upside-down at a range where the words are not distinct. Then, you are expected to choose one word and focus your attention around it, to see if you can determine any of the letters.

Skeptics? Not in relation to physical fact. Circumcision Not cutting it?

Circumcision has endured because of tradition, not because of rationale nor medical benefit.

Nor has it ever been successful as an anti-masturbatory measure, which is why it gained prominence in the West 150 years ago.

When a custom remains after its original intent has vanished, it has morphed into a ritual.

And ritual is one of the kinder words to describe removing highly-innervated tissue from the most vulnerable members of our species, without any benefit in return.

The relic rests in the same vein as coming-of-age rituals and other practices that involve cutting, slicing, burning, and flogging.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, one in 500 boys experience acute complications from circumcision. Even a 0.2% risk is Not acceptable when there is no chance of reward.

Still it endures because, to most Westerners, that’s the way it’s always been. But the appeal to tradition is a logical fallacy that, were it rigidly adhered to, would have us still with slavery and without women’s suffrage. 

Imagine if circumcision had never been practiced and someone proposed we begin fondling and mutilating the infant genitals. The collective response would be revulsion.  Yet the practice continues today because, well, just because.

Reasons include ensuring the infant conform to religious norms or so that they will look like their father.

But faith should be a personal choice and if a father was missing three fingers, no one would suggest lopping off the digits to ensure familial uniformity.

A third reason proponents give is because they think it looks unappealing. But that’s only because they are used to seeing circumcised penises.  Were every male intact, proponents would see circumcised members as the freaky outcasts. 

Parents deciding to circumcise their sons is distinct from having them vaccinated or given Vitamin K boosters, as these have identifiable benefits.

Chopping off someone else’s body part would mean prison time under any other circumstance, but exception made for the most vulnerable victim.

In a depressing display of bipartisanship, the practice remains prevalent among persons of all political leanings.

Conservatives still go for the religion and tradition angles, which is to be expected.

Harder to comprehend is the tepid response from liberals, who should be demanding bodily autonomy over the most defenseless of our species.

It has been pointed out that  we should never make Junior hug an aunt just because she’s visiting for Christmas if the child doesn’t wish too. Yet, somehow this mindset does not extend to control over the most private part.

With no medical benefit, circumcision is a solution in need of a problem.  Proponents sometimes cite hygiene, but this is no more logical that lopping off our ears to prevent dirt from accumulating within.

One seemingly more valid reason is the chance of reducing HIV infection.

But this is an untruth and based on studies that make such basic mistakes as assuming all transmission was due to heterosexual sex. Also, if the studies were correct, and the practice provided STD protection, there would be a wide difference in infection rates between the circumcised and intact. 

Note: I can speak from personal experience.

I decided for circumcision when I was 26 after a painful unachieved sexual encounter. I had never masturbated and was still physically a “virgin”.

When I checked with a female physician, she transferred me to a male physician, and for a good reason. The physician “recovered” my swollen penis and taught me how to retract and recover. I was to get it down by doing this exercise 3 times a day. And I reasoned that getting circumcised would same me from this tedious exercise.

Sure I suffered for 2 weeks of pain and inconvenience, but I am glad for taking this decision

And I am wondering: If I were circumcised, would I have masturbated much early on?

If were circumcised, wouldn’t I be bold enough to try sexual encounter much earlier?

And I feel circumcision is actually necessary for a normal growing up of males, and more hygienic too.

Many children had to be circumcised because they lacked the necessary training to clean their penis when taking showers.

How can a layperson differentiate between Alzheimer and other more confusing loss of memories?

Maybe it is Not Alzheimer, but the memory confusion maybe worse to everyone concerned

Are you afraid of having Alzheimer’s?

Or Someone close to be afflicted with Alzheimer?

Those who really suffer from a memory disease, like in Alzheimer, they do Not realize what is happening or that they forgot to do something or forgot a name…

Probably your perception of memory loss is Not due to Alzheimer’s?

If anyone is aware of his memory problems, he doesn’t have Alzheimer’s.

It often happens in people aged 60 and over that they complain that their memory is lacking: Like the information is still in the brain, but it is the ” Processor ” that is missing., or failing to function properly.. It is labeled “temporary oblivion“.

My memory difficulties with names of persons and objects and fruits and vegetables… is worrying me.

The instances that I am excited and talkative, I feel that I can be a stand up comic and all words are fluent and coming quickly.

My mother condition is much worse: She cannot form an entire sentence and she get terribly frustrated and start to cry.

Yes, mother is aware of the deteriorating condition of her memory.

Lately, the TV has become a live and living scenes: People on TV are actually talking to her, and any procession on TV is converging to her house. And she get busy arranging coffee cups… waiting for the arrival of the visitors.

Mother confuses names: her own daughter receives the name of her late oldest sister. Many times she calls me Georges, the name of my late father.

 Elie Bashour posted this following article on July 27, 2018 and I am re-editing it.

”There are times when I speak, I can stop and don’t know what I was talking about…
I was afraid it was a start of Alzheimer’s… but today, reading this article, I’m reassured.”

In the following analysis, French Professor Bruno Dubois Director of the institute of memory and Alzheimer’s disease (Imma) at mercy-Salpêtrière – Paris Hospitals / addresses the subject in a rather reassuring way:

”If anyone is aware of his memory problems, he doesn’t have Alzheimer’s. ” “

1. I forget family names…
2. I don’t remember where I tidied up some things…

Half of the people aged 60 and over present some symptoms that are rather due to age than to disease.

The most common cases are:
– Oblivion of a person’s name,
– the fact that we went to a room in the house and never remember why we were going…
– a white memory for a movie title or an actor, an actress,
– a waste of time looking where we left his glasses or keys…

After 60 years most people have such difficulty.

This indicates that this is not a disease but rather a characteristic due to the passage of the years…

Many people are concerned about these omissions and the importance of the following statement:

” those who are aware of these omissions have no serious problem of memory.

Professor Bruno Dubois, director of Imma, reassures the majority of people concerned by their omissions:

” the more you complain about memory loss, the less likely it is you suffer from a memory disease. ” ”

– Now a little neurological test.
Only use your eyes!

1-find the c in the table below!

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Oco
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

2-if you already found the c, then find the 6 in the table below.

99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
69999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999

3-now find the n in the table below. Careful, it’s a little harder!

Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmnmm
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

If you pass these three tests without problems:

– you can cancel your annual visit to the neurologist.
– your brain is in perfect shape!
– you’re far from having any relationship with Alzheimer’s.

So, circulate. Be reassure…

And why am I not reassured?

The consequences are as bad. Better Not know what’s going around me.

Are these the Covid-19 recommendations from Maryland University?

Most probably, we are set to live with the Covid-19 for a long time.

We have got to learn and train our daily habits to survive this pandemics without major health degradation.

Wear a mask made of 3 layers of different fabrics in enclosed environment

Frequently wash your hands with soap and Not with bacteria disinfectant liquids, as you touch objects

Learn to keep the distance of 2 meters, even inside your home

Frequently enjoy clean air outside spaces and let your system be contact with all kinds of outside bacteria to increase your immune system.

Fortifying your immune system is Not a cure for catching this virus

No, the visus does Not attach to your shoes, but learn to walk barefoot inside your home

Your skin is the best defense against all kinds of viruses and bacterias

بيان من عيادة الأمراض المعدية في جامعة ميريلاند الأمريكية:

1. قد نضطر إلى العيش مع C19 لشهور أو سنوات، دعونا لا ننكره أو نذعر، دعونا نتعلم كيف نتعايش مع هذه الحقيقة.

2. لا يمكنك تدمير فيروسات C19 التي اخترقت جدران الخلايا، حتى لو شربت غالونات من الماء الساخن؛ فقط ستذهب إلى الحمام كثيرا.

3. غسل اليدين والمحافظة على مسافة جسدية بطول مترين ( 2 m) هي أفضل طريقة لحمايتك.

4. إذا لم يكن لديك مريض C19 في المنزل ، فلا حاجة لتطهير الأسطح في منزلك.

5. البضائع المعبأة ومضخات الغاز وعربات التسوق وأجهزة الصراف الآلي لا تسبب العدوى، فقط اغسل يديك، وعش حياتك كالمعتاد.

6. إن C19 ليست عدوى غذائية، تترافق مع قطرات من العدوى مثل الانفلونزا، لا يوجد خطر واضح لانتقال C19 عن طريق طلب الطعام.

7. يمكن أن تفقد حاسة الشم مع الكثير من الحساسية والالتهابات الفيروسية، هذه ليست دائما أعراض تدل على إصابة بفيروس C19.

8. بمجرد أن تكون في المنزل لا تحتاج إلى تغيير ملابسك على وجه السرعة والاستحمام، الطهارة فضيلة، ولكن هوس الخوف ليس كذلك!

9. فيروس C19 لا يعلق في الهواء. هذه عدوى تنفسية تتطلب اتصالًا وثيقًا.

10. الهواء نظيف يمكنك المشي في الحدائق (فقط حافظ على مسافة الحماية المناسبة).

11. يكفي استخدام الصابون العادي ضد C19 ، وليس الصابون المضاد للبكتيريا.

12. لا داعي للقلق بشأن طلبات الطعام الخاصة بك، ولكن يمكنك تسخينها في الميكروويف، إذا كنت ترغب في ذلك.

13. فرصة إحضار C19 إلى المنزل مع أحذيتك غير صحيحة. أنا أعمل ضد الفيروسات منذُ 20 عامًا – فالعدوى لا تنتشر بهذه الطريقة!

14. لا يمكنك القضاء على الفيروس بأخذ الخل وعصير قصب السكر والزنجبيل! هذه لرفع مستوى الحصانة وليست علاجا.

15. ارتداء الكمامة لفترات طويلة يتعارض مع مستويات التنفس والأكسجين. ارتديه فقط في الأماكن المزدحمة.

16. ارتداء القفازات هو أيضا فكرة سيئة. يمكن أن يتراكم الفيروس في القفاز وينتقل بسهولة إذا لمست وجهك. الأفضل أن تغسل يديك بانتظام.

17- المناعة تضعف إلى حد كبير من خلال البقاء دائماً في بيئة معقمة. حتى إذا كنت تأكل أطعمة تعزز المناعة ،

يرجى الخروج من منزلك بانتظام إلى أي حديقة / شاطئ، فالمناعة تزيد من خلال التعرض للأمراض، وليس عن طريق الجلوس في المنزل وتناول الأطعمة المقلية / الحارة / والسكريات.

The right to end your terminally miserable life out of constant pains?

Feasting on Gore (Written in 1999)

1.   X-rays don’t hurt: no pain.

Chemo is different: You lose your mane.

Cancer, hospital appointment, hospital confinement, terminal.

Convicted criminal, prison, delayed execution, terminus.

2.   Dressed in apron, back naked, abandoned, and forgotten;

Robbed of your money, robbed of dignity, and robbed of life.

A case study you are, for all to learn from experiments.

The more cases the better the knowledge.

3.   You lived; lived enough.

Let others learn and live, a while longer.

The “right to live folks” need to hang the Kevorkian’s,

Every single one of them:

Those who aid the terminally ill to die with his own choice.

4.   Pain, constant pains, no end in sight, no cure.

Wait till the healthy, spineless soul of the “right to live” maniacs

Needs a Kevorkian,

But will be surrounded with pale faces feasting on gore.

5.   I have the power to predict the end.  I know the odds:

You either die instantly or you live,

In the mind of all you know,

half-man. Abandoned.

6.   You may listen to the pillars of moral characters,

You may nod to the Talking Heads:  They talk well.

I have decided on my destiny.

It shall be quick.

Drug Research Contracts: Keeping Pharmaceutical companies out of reach from procsecution?

An article published in the NYT in November 29, 2004

“Of the 12 studies for (the church of Pfizer), all 5 of the reports claiming positive results, meaning the drug worked without worrisome side effects, that were submitted for possible regulatory approval were published.

The 7 other studies were inconclusive or negative, which can mean that the drug failed to work or that the test failed because of its design.

(Two of the studies were never submitted to the Food and Drug Administration to support an application for the drug’s approval.)”

“In her Zoloft study, Dr. Wagner acknowledged that she had received “research support” over the years from several drug manufacturers including Pfizer, which paid $80,000 to the Galveston center in connection with the Zoloft test.

But she did not state that she also received sizable payments from the company for work she did related to the study.”

Dr. Karen Dineen Wagner of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Published in November 29, 2004 under “Contracts Keep Drug Research Out of Reach”

(Page 3 of 5)

Dr. Wagner, vice chairwoman of the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Galveston center, declined to be interviewed for this article but did reply to some questions in writing. Officials of the Galveston center insisted that the industry money she received did not affect her work.

A Researcher’s Role

It was hardly surprising that many manufacturers of popular antidepressants already approved for use in adults would turn to an established researcher like Dr. Wagner to test them in young patients.

In the late 1990’s, she was one of a small number of researchers with experience in testing drugs intended to treat children with problems like attention deficit disorder and bipolar disorder.

Over the last decade, Dr. Wagner has led or worked on some 20 studies published in medical journals, and the government has financed some of her work.

She has also attracted a large number of including those aimed at testing whether antidepressants approved for use in adults were safe and effective in children and adolescents.

Dr. Wagner’s role varied in 12 industry-sponsored trials in which antidepressants were tested against placebos for depression or other problems. On three of them, including a Zoloft trial, she was a lead investigator, working with company researchers to plan, analyze and write results up for publication.

On the others, her duties were limited to overseeing test patients at her clinic.

Of the 12 studies, all five of the reports claiming positive results, meaning the drug worked without worrisome side effects, that were submitted for possible regulatory approval were published. The seven other studies were inconclusive or negative, which can mean that the drug failed to work or that the test failed because of its design. (Two of them were never submitted to the Food and Drug Administration to support an application for the drug’s approval.)

Because many of the antidepressant studies were unpublished, many doctors never heard about the results.

Their findings were typically disclosed in limited settings, like talks at meetings of medical specialists or on a poster displayed in a room with dozens of other posters, which is a typical way of disseminating research results at professional conferences.

Several researchers who worked on the pediatric antidepressant trials said that in many cases they had little incentive to submit ambiguous or failed trials to medical journals because they thought the papers would be rejected by journal editors.

One of those researchers, Dr. Neal Ryan, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, said there has typically been little publishing interest in studies with inconclusive findings or those that failed to work because of study design, a type sometimes referred to as a negative study.

“No one gets famous from publishing negative studies,” Dr. Ryan said.

In response to a question, Dr. Wagner wrote that in all the cases where she was the lead investigator, test results had been or would soon be published or presented at medical meetings.

It was her study of Zoloft for childhood depression, financed by Pfizer, that attracted the most attention and criticism. Results were published last summer in The Journal of the American Medical Association as the debate on pediatric antidepressant use was rising; the study concluded that the drug effectively treated depression.

The finding received widespread publicity in newspapers, including The New York Times.

“This study is both clinically and statistically significant,” Dr. Wagner said last year. “The medication was effective.”

But some academic researchers said that the difference in improvement that the study found between young depressed patients taking Zoloft and similar patients who received a placebo – 10 percentage points – was not substantial.

Asked about complaints about the trial, Dr. Wagner referred to a statement in The Journal of the American Medical Association in which she responded last year to critical letters.

In that statement, Dr. Wagner said she believed that the 10 percentage point difference was “clinically meaningful.”

A Possible Conflict (of interest?)

In her Zoloft study, Dr. Wagner acknowledged that she had received “research support” over the years from several drug manufacturers including Pfizer, which paid $80,000 to the Galveston center in connection with the Zoloft test. But she did not state that she also received sizable payments from the company for work she did related to the study.

Note: Dr. Karen Dineen Wagner participated in more than a dozen industry-financed pediatric trials of antidepressants and other types of drugs from 1998 to 2001.

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