Adonis Diaries

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Masters in Mining and Metallurgy: The Phoenicians

The Island of Malta (Maleth for refuge and haven), across Libya, was reserved by the Phoenicians as one of their principle locations to save their goods in period of wars and increased sea pirate attacks.  The people in Malta made good use of the miles of underground corridors dug by the Phoenicians in order to protect themselves from the bombs dropped on them by Italy during WWII. Those ancient corridors served the Phoenicians as warehouses for their precious goods and valuable minerals.

Cape Sounion in southern Greece has endless underground galleries, similar to those in Malta.

At the single location in Salaber (Asturias) underground excavation attained a space of 4 million cubic-meter, with a base reaching deep under sea level…

According to Franz Carl Movers, a 12-kilometer channel was dug up along this desert and arid site in order to flood and wash the ore of minerals.

In Albameda, near Oviedo in north Portugal, 3 aqueducts were dug up on a hillside to provide water to the Phoenician metal plant.

The Phoenicians excavated 4,200 meters of a network of tunnels to mine precious stones in the Amazon city of Maranon in Brazil.

Adrian Paillette, an engineer scholar, commented:

“The Phoenician’s metal=works demonstrated a very high and advanced level of metallurgical expertise and artistry that the Romans and the Arabs never reached at the height of their civilizations…”

The name of the Pyrenees mountains is derived from pyretta or fire, and it is due to the multiple forest fires started by the Phoenicians explorer in order to extensively exploit the silver ore.

The water tower to feed Tyr with water had sources in underground waterways. The water soared 5 meters above the level of the water source and the tower was 20 meters in diameter. The incoming water was roaring and surging to easily power multiple large mills.

The roads of Tyre and Carthage were paved at the very early stages of their founding.

The Phoenician cement outperformed current “Portland cement“. Even after 4,000 years, the aqueducts of Paleo-Tyre, remnant of what can be seen in Ras el Ain, is still standing, indestructible, and sturdier than sheer rock.

Mind you that Tyre is derived from Tzuur, the Rock.

As Paul Valery wrote in the “Architect, 1923”:

This audacious Phoenician ceaselessly agitated the Ocean…”

Note: From “6,000 years of peaceful contribution to mankind” by late Charles Corm


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

November 2020
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