Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Ayn Rand

Today offspring are tomorrow monsters; 

            The optimist Biosphere/Earth has its own stabilizing mechanism; it is indifferent to power-avid pessimist man. This unattached earth/biosphere mechanism may burn, suffocate, or drown man and it would not even notice or care for its existence.   

            Through the ages earth/biosphere underwent changes and man either thrived and developed or died consequent to the environmental changes.  All the time, man got curious about his environment and wanted to understand and then uncover the mysteries of that power surrounding him and controlling his life cycle. By the bye, man formulated general laws of nature; then, before he could fathom a tiny portion of the complex mysteries and the multiple interactions among the sparse and conditioned laws this impatient and anxious man endeavored to modify and transform nature to his own wants and restricted interests.

            Man wants to alter earth and the biosphere with the tacit understanding that he will not be affected. Man keeps forgetting, intentionally, that he is what he is because of earth and biosphere. Man can alter earth and biosphere; biosphere will, imperturbably, react at its own pace; the offspring of today are the monsters of tomorrow; if the monster is permitted to exist at all.

            The Western “modern” mind insisted that “the genesis of man (species and child development) is a process of primarily interacting with things; human interactions are a secondary and not a significant factor”.  In fact, most early scientist and researchers lived in their islands of palaces or laboratories with little contact with people.  They were intent on mastering their material environment.  Ayn Rand’s writings incarnated the mentality of the individual attribute of spirit and intelligence. She wrote: “The spirit is an individual attribute. Collective brain does not exist.  Man living in relation to others has no reality.”  Ayn Rand was expressing the prevalent pre-supposition at the turn of the century and she was formulating their radical consequences.

            Jules Verne stories of individualistic heroes and his successors of visionaries, explorers, adventurers, exploiters, and colonial expansionists refused to admit limitations to their intelligence and undertaking power.  They had grand “destiny” to impose and prove: man is born to reign and dominate and not to complain. Something broke then we fix it. Something blocked expansion then we erased it: there are always solutions to difficulties. There are no inherent problems to the enterprising man; as Napoleon said “Impossible is not in my vocabulary”.

            Jules Verne never missed a good shooting spree story at savages; in “Five weeks in balloon” they are shooting at the African negros from the top of a balloon; in “The children of captain Grant” they are shooting at will on Maoris in New Guinea from the top of rocky hills; in “The travel around the world in 80 days” they are killing the Sioux Indians from the doors of moving wagons; in “From Earth to the moon” they are annihilating the Seminole Indians; in “Mathias Sandorf” the savage Senoussis of Libya are exterminated.      

            Colonialism was initiated and undertaken by “democratically” elected government; thus fascism, Nazism, and communism have nothing to do with the spirit of “modernizing” the “barbaric” people. Our current modern man is typified by “Hot Air” Charles Branson; I don’t means his cross Atlantic, Pacific, or around the world balloons and airliners but gases emanating from his ass hole. The Western heroes are children who do not want to be rebuffed from the game: the entire planet is their game land. “When we were children, we were told not to feel afraid or cry: it was shameful. It was a time, and still is pretty much, when growing up meant to vanquish fear; to live in the delusion of the all conquering man.”

            Human intelligence and know how are intrinsically community intelligence. It is the community that initiates man to things and behavior.  Man needs at least 16 years of inter-communal aid and secure before he gets aware of his individuality and begins to revolt and seek a semblance of independence.

            We are at a junction when man is capable of envisioning a limited earth (weight, circumference, volume, and extractable minerals) and limits to the biosphere (thickness, density, and constituents).  There are intersections at several levels of consciousness. We are beginning to comprehend the limitations of technology to containing the power of nature such as tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes, and changing climates; the catastrophic consequences of mastering nuclear energy (Chernobyl is a striking example); the long term problems of gigantic projects such as deviating rivers, and building monster dams.  We realize that our survival is intrinsically linked to the biosphere.  It is a junction of the meeting of man’s brain with the limits of biosphere and our recognition that biosphere is much more complex and that it has indeed engendered our kind of intelligence.

            We are harassed with the dictum “Science is neutral; experiments are unbiased”. One of the urgent tasks of the United Nations is to investigate how science and research are financed or funded.  Everything has a political direction and I contend that sciences, research, and technologies are primarily driven by deep pocket political interest groups.  We can no longer keep fighting those biased and politically oriented “research” results instead of focusing on the reality of earth/biosphere degradations.

Note: read my follow up post “The illusion of knowing…”

Today offspring are tomorrow monsters; (September 18, 2009)

 

            The optimist Biosphere/Earth has its own stabilizing mechanism; it is indifferent to power-avid pessimist man. This unattached earth/biosphere mechanism may burn, suffocate, or drown man and it would not even notice or care for its existence.   

            Through the ages earth/biosphere underwent changes and man either thrived and developed or died consequent to the environmental changes.  All the time, man got curious about his environment and wanted to understand and then uncover the mysteries of that power surrounding him and controlling his life cycle. By the bye, man formulated general laws of nature; then, before he could fathom a tiny portion of the complex mysteries and the multiple interactions among the sparse and conditioned laws this impatient and anxious man endeavored to modify and transform nature to his own wants and restricted interests.

            Man wants to alter earth and the biosphere with the tacit understanding that he will not be affected. Man keeps forgetting, intentionally, that he is what he is because of earth and biosphere. Man can alter earth and biosphere; biosphere will, imperturbably, react at its own pace; the offspring of today are the monsters of tomorrow; if the monster is permitted to exist at all.

            The Western “modern” mind insisted that “the genesis of man (species and child development) is a process of primarily interacting with things; human interactions are a secondary and not a significant factor”.  In fact, most early scientist and researchers lived in their islands of palaces or laboratories with little contact with people.  They were intent on mastering their material environment.  Ayn Rand’s writings incarnated the mentality of the individual attribute of spirit and intelligence. She wrote: “The spirit is an individual attribute. Collective brain does not exist.  Man living in relation to others has no reality.”  Ayn Rand was expressing the prevalent pre-supposition at the turn of the century and she was formulating their radical consequences.

            Jules Verne stories of individualistic heroes and his successors of visionaries, explorers, adventurers, exploiters, and colonial expansionists refused to admit limitations to their intelligence and undertaking power.  They had grand “destiny” to impose and prove: man is born to reign and dominate and not to complain. Something broke then we fix it. Something blocked expansion then we erased it: there are always solutions to difficulties. There are no inherent problems to the enterprising man; as Napoleon said “Impossible is not in my vocabulary”.

            Jules Verne never missed a good shooting spree story at savages; in “Five weeks in balloon” they are shooting at the African negros from the top of a balloon; in “The children of captain Grant” they are shooting at will on Maoris in New Guinea from the top of rocky hills; in “The travel around the world in 80 days” they are killing the Sioux Indians from the doors of moving wagons; in “From Earth to the moon” they are annihilating the Seminole Indians; in “Mathias Sandorf” the savage Senoussis of Libya are exterminated.     

            Colonialism was initiated and undertaken by “democratically” elected government; thus fascism, Nazism, and communism have nothing to do with the spirit of “modernizing” the “barbaric” people. Our current modern man is typified by “Hot Air” Charles Branson; I don’t means his cross Atlantic, Pacific, or around the world balloons and airliners but gases emanating from his ass hole. The Western heroes are children who do not want to be rebuffed from the game: the entire planet is their game land. “When we were children, we were told not to feel afraid or cry: it was shameful. It was a time, and still is pretty much, when growing up meant to vanquish fear; to live in the delusion of the all conquering man.”

            Human intelligence and know how are intrinsically community intelligence. It is the community that initiates man to things and behavior.  Man needs at least 16 years of inter-communal aid and secure before he gets aware of his individuality and begins to revolt and seek a semblance of independence.

            We are at a junction when man is capable of envisioning a limited earth (weight, circumference, volume, and extractable minerals) and limits to the biosphere (thickness, density, and constituents).  There are intersections at several levels of consciousness. We are beginning to comprehend the limitations of technology to containing the power of nature such as tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes, and changing climates; the catastrophic consequences of mastering nuclear energy (Chernobyl is a striking example); the long term problems of gigantic projects such as deviating rivers, and building monster dams.  We realize that our survival is intrinsically linked to the biosphere.  It is a junction of the meeting of man’s brain with the limits of biosphere and our recognition that biosphere is much more complex and that it has indeed engendered our kind of intelligence.

            We are harassed with the dictum “Science is neutral; experiments are unbiased”. One of the urgent tasks of the United Nations is to investigate how science and research are financed or funded.  Everything has a political direction and I contend that sciences, research, and technologies are primarily driven by deep pocket political interest groups.  We can no longer keep fighting those biased and politically oriented “research” results instead of focusing on the reality of earth/biosphere degradations.

“We the Living” by Ayn Rand (Written on July, 24, 2004)

Ayn Rand immigrated from Russia to the United States in 1926. She was barely able to speak the English language, but mastered it in the next twelve years.

Ayn Rand is an author with a definite philosophy: A quote from her early play ‘Ideal’, the cry of the movie star Kay Gonda:

“I want my glory real! I want to know that there is someone, somewhere, who wants it too! Or else, what is the use of seeing it, and working, and burning oneself for an impossible vision?  A spirit, too, needs fuel. It can run dry.”

Rand elaborates her viewpoint: “I believe that the worst curse on mankind is the ability to consider ideals as something quite abstract;

Ideals detached from one’s everyday life. This applies to the hypocrites who tolerate a complete break between convictions and their lives, and still believe that they have convictions. Either their ideals or their lives are worthless-and usually both”.

 Ayn Rand has her own writing style:

Her style consists in integrating the facts and their meaning, whether she is describing physical nature, human action, or the hidden emotion. The description starts by re-creating the concrete reality, then we are offered some preliminary abstractions. We accept the account and we see its inner logic. We are given some vivid images to help keeping the reality concrete and to developing the meaning further. Finally, after this buildup, we are given a single abstraction which unites facts, preliminary abstraction and images.

Consider, for example, a paragraph which describes Vesta Dunning on the screen:

“She had not learned the proper camera angles,

She had not learned the correct screen makeup;

Her mouth was too large, her cheeks too gaunt,

Her hair uncombed, her movements too jerky and angular.

She was like nothing ever seen in a film before.

She was a contradiction to all standards; she was awkward, crude, shocking,

She was like a breath of fresh air.  The studio had expected her to be hated;

She was suddenly worshiped by the public.

She was not pretty, nor gracious, nor gentle, nor sweet;

She played the part of a young girl, not as a tubercular flower but as a steel knife.

A reviewer said that she was a cross between a medieval page-boy and a gun moll.

She achieved the incredible:

She was the first women who ever allowed herself to make strength attractive on the screen”.

 Miss Rand wrote only one detective play:

She would never give the central action in a story of hers to anyone but the hero.

Thus, it was pointless writing more than one detective story.

 I read a selection from Ayn Rand unpublished fiction and edited by Leonard Peikoff.

From 1926 to 1929 there are 4 novellas:

“The husband I bought”, “Good copy”, “Escort” and “Her second career”.

During the depression from 1931 to 1934, Miss Rand worked in the studio office

Of the RKO wardrobe department and learned the movie business.

She produced in these early thirties:

“Red pawn”, excerpts from “We the living” and the play “Ideal”.

Late thirties, from 1938 to 1942, established her as a professional writer with her famous ‘The Fountainhead’.

The play “Think twice” and two unpublished excerpts from “The Fountainhead

“Vesta Dunning” and “Roark and Cameron” are from this era.

That Miss Rand decided that these two chapters were redundant

Because the characters were close replicates of her other heroes in “The Fountainhead”.

In “The husband I bought”, Irene, a young and beautiful girl, falls in love with a gorgeous and young businessman Henry Stafford.

Henry’s business got bankrupt and Irene liquidated all her properties to pay his debts.

They got married and lived four wonderful years self sufficient with their love.

Henry falls in love with an enigmatic divorced lady, elegant and more beautiful than her.

Henry is miserable because of his gratitude to his wife.

The wife faked cheating him to release him from any link with her.

Irene relocates to an undisclosed place and lives miserably

Longing to see Henry again but not meeting him.

Irene’s only goal in life was her love to Henry.

That gratitude can generate a debilitating life and is the nemesis to freedom is a recurring theme in her works.

‘Escort’ is about a gorgeous husband who work as an escort to rich ladies who need company going out.

For three years she was convinced that he worked night shifts as a shipping clerk.

For three years he never took her out dancing or for seeing a movie because he is starkly recognized in all clubs, dancing places and movie theaters.

One night, his wife calls an escort agency to have an honest night out. Her husband is handed his own address to pick up the customer.

 Ayn Rand despised Hollywood’s movies trite values

That she described as “Incommunicable vulgarity of spirit”.

She singled out an inner mental practice

Or default as the basic cause for Hollywood undiscriminating taste.

 The hero of ‘Her second career’ is a famous script writer who described the business in such terms:

“There’s no one in this business with an honest idea of what’s good and what’s bad.

There’s no one who’s not scared green of having such an idea for himself”.

 They’re all sitting around waiting for someone to tell them; begging someone to tell them.  Anyone, just so they won’t have to take the awful responsibility of judging and valuing on their own.

So merit doesn’t exist here”.

The story describes the hardships of a most famous movie star who accepts the challenge of the famous script writer to start over her movie career.

Nobody ever recognizes her in her attempts of securing even the part of an extra.

As a face saving gesture, the script writer forces the producer to give her the part of the second feminine lead in the next film.

She gave the best of her personality and experience in that film

The story ends with a reviewer stating that the film was a stupendous achievement;

But “we would like to remark in passing on a small annoyance in a perfect evening.

We are speaking of the second feminine lead.

It’s one of those innocent, insipid little things with nothing but a sweet smile

And a pretty face.  She reminds us of some star or other, but her weak,

Colorless portrayal f the country maiden shows the disadvantages of a good part in the hand of an inexperienced amateur”.

‘Red Pawn’ is about an American lady who volunteered to be the concubine of the commander of a prison (Kareyev, known as The Beast) on Strastnoy Island in the northern arctic region of the Soviet Union; an island that was a former monastery for Russian monks before the revolution.

“The civil war in Russia had given Kareyev contempt of death.  Peace gave him Strastnoy Island and contempt for life” said Miss Rand.

The prisoners are not locked in cells because there is no way for any escape.

Provisions are sent to the island twice a year.

A British merchant has arranged for Joan or (her original name of Francis)

To go to the island in order to secure the evasion of her Russian husband Michael.

The tall Beast in his forties falls in love with Francis and starts to enjoy life and the luxury attached to the inklings of Francis.

She learns to love him dearly and more than her husband.

Finally, Kareyev agrees to flee the island with Michael and Francis.

The militia catches up with them.  Her husband is seriously injured.

When Francis is asked who is her husband she points at the commander.

Kareyev is sent back to the prison to be executed as an evaded prisoner.

Francis and Michael will be helped by the British merchant to be shipped out of Russia.

Book reviews:  Of controversial manuscripts? Posted in 2008

Many of the books that I have reviewed were written prior to 2008, before I discovered wordpress.com, and they might be categorized as controversial.  

It is not my job to fall into that trap of judging what is fine to read.  I simply reviews,  summarizes, and add my comments of what I have read that express deep feeling and personal reflections.  

I always give my “expert” opinions anyway:  It is your right to express your opinion.

There are books that I had to publish several posts on particular chapters, simply because topics are interesting and need further development.

1) “Life after Life” by Dr. Raymond Moody, (written in June 7, 2004)

2) “A Priest among “Les Loubards”” by Guy Gilbert, (written in July 22, 2004)

3) “We the Living” by Ayn Rand, (written in July, 24, 2004)

4) “Prophesies of End of Timeby Paco Rabanne, (November 15, 2004)

5) “Alexander the Great”, (November 20, 2004)

6) “The Lexus and the Olive Tree” by Thomas Friedman (July 28, 2006)

7) “Season of Migration to the North” by Tayeb Saleh, (August 10, 2006)

8) “The Princes of the Crazy Years” by Gilbert Gilleminault and Philippe Bernert.

9) “Carlos Ghosn: Citoyen du Monde” by Philippe Ries, (Septembre 27, 2006)

10) “Abbo”by Nabil Al Milhem, (November 23, 2006)

11) “Human Types; Essence and the Enneagram” by Suzan Zannos, (December 6, 2006)

12) “One hundred fallacies on the Middle East (ME)” by Fred Haliday, (March 2, 2007)

13) “Origins” by Amin Maaluf, February 15, 2007

14) “Imagined Masculinity” edited by Mai Ghoussoub and Emma Sinclair-Webb

15) “Post-modernism: the Arabs in a video snapshot” by Mai Ghoussoub,( March 4, 2007)

16) “The Joke” by Milan Kundera, (March 22, 2007)

17) “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury, March 28, 2007

18)  “Biography” of In3am Ra3d, April 7, 2007

19)  “Al-Walid Bin Talal”, April 4, 2007

20) “The Gardens of Light” by Amin Maaluf, April 19, 2007

21) “Two old women” by Velma Wallis, May 1, 2007

22) “I heard the owl call my name” by Margaret Craven, May 3, 2007

23) “A woman of independent means” by Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, May 6, 2007

24) “The Gospel according to Pilate” by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, May 9, 2007

25) “Les innovations du XXI siecle qui vont changer notre vie” by Eric de Riedmatten.

26) “Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom, July 3, 2007

27) “Liban: le salut par la culture” by Phares Zoghbi, August 19, 2007

28) “Finding Joy” by Charlote Davis Kasl, August 22, 2007

29) “Tadjoura” by Jean Francois Deniau, Septembre 6, 2007

30) “How to dance forever” by Daniel Nagrin, September 8, 2007

31.  “The Second sex” by Simone de Beauvoir, (September 21, 2007)

32.  “A short history of nearly everything” by Bill Bryson, (September 25, 2007)

33.  “The God of mirrors” by Robert Reilly, (October 1st, 2007)

34.  “The tipping point” by Malcom Gladwell, (October 9, 2007)

35.  “The social structure of Lebanon: democracy or servitude?” by Safia Saadeh

October 15, 2007

36. “Fallaci interviews Fallaci and Apocalypse”, by Oriana Falaci (November 8, 2007)

37. “Aicha la bien-aime du Prophet” by Genevieve Chauvel (November 19, 2007)

38.  “Tess of the D’Uberville” Thomas Hardy, (December 19, 2007)

39. “Le livre des saviors” edited by Constantin von Barloewen (December 22, 2007)

40.  Gandhi’s non-violent resistance guidelines (February 21, 2008)

41. “The Da Vinci Code” by Dan Brown (March 12, 2008)

42. “La reine de Palmyre” by Denise Brahimi (March 26, 2007)

43. “Culture et resistance” by Edward W. Said (April 18, 2008)

44. “L’Avorton de Dieu; une vie de Saint Paul” by Alain Decaux (April 23, 2008)

45.  “Down and out in Paris and London” by George Orwell (July 14, 2008)

46. “Why the Arab World is not free?” by Moustapha Safouan (July 21, 2008)

47.  “Igino Giordani” by Jean-Marie Wallet and Tommaso Sorgi (August 5, 2008)

48.  “Building a durable World” in “Science et Vie” magazine special issue of June 2008 (August 10, 2008)


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