Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘bread basket

Israeli Soldiers leading fighting units in Kiev

Has Zionist Israel shot itself in the foot getting closely engaged in the western Ukrain uprising?

First, a short history and potentials of Ukrain. This “independent State” is 600,000 sq.km, vaster than France and a bit smaller than Texas and 45 million strong.

The GDP is about $300 billion and 54% of its land is fertile and used in agriculture. Ukrain has always been the bread basket of Europe and Russia in wheat and corn.

50% of Russia gas and oil destined to western Europe flow in Ukrain.

The latest events have demonstrated that Ukrain has Russia majority in the eastern region and Crimea. Crimea and the States around the Black Sea were occupied by Catherine II Russian troops and snatched from the Othoman Empire territories.

Crimea is 70% Russian and the Russian fleet in the Black Sea is the most powerful navy. The Navy Ukrain chief rallied the Russian fleet. Cremea is now a de-facto a Russian province.

East Ukrain is mostly populated with Russians and a counter uprising is taking place at a large scale.

Second, let’s read what  reported from Kiev in the daily Ha’aretz this Feb. 28, 2014, before I develop further in the notes.

He calls his troops “the Blue Helmets of Maidan,” but brown is the color of the headgear worn by Delta — the nom de guerre of the commander of a Jewish-led militia force that participated in the Ukrainian revolution.

Under his helmet, he also wears a kippah.

‘Delta’, ex-Israeli soldier, headed ‘the Blue Helmets of Maidan’ of 40 men and women – including several IDF veterans – in violent clashes with government forces.

Delta, the nom de guerre of the Jewish commander of a Ukrainian street-fighting unit.

Delta, the nom de guerre of the Jewish commander of a Ukrainian street-fighting unit, is pictured in Kiev earlier this month. Photo by Courtesy

Delta, a Ukraine-born former soldier in the Israel Defense Forces, spoke to JTA Thursday on condition of anonymity.

He explained how he came to use combat skills he acquired in the Shu’alei Shimshon reconnaissance battalion of the Givati infantry brigade to rise through the ranks of Kiev’s street fighters.

He has headed a force of 40 men and women — including several fellow IDF veterans — in violent clashes with government forces.

Several Ukrainian Jews, including Rabbi Moshe Azman, one of the country’s claimants to the title of chief rabbi, confirmed Delta’s identity and role in the still-unfinished revolution.

The “Blue Helmets” nickname, a reference to the UN peacekeeping force, stuck after Delta’s unit last month prevented a mob from torching a building occupied by Ukrainian police, he said. “There were dozens of officers inside, surrounded by 1,200 demonstrators who wanted to burn them alive,” he recalled. “We intervened and negotiated their safe passage.”

The problem, he said, was that the officers would not leave without their guns, citing orders. Delta told JTA his unit reasoned with the mob to allow the officers to leave with their guns. “It would have been a massacre, and that was not an option,” he said.

The Blue Helmets comprise 35 men and women who are not Jewish, and who are led by five ex-IDF soldiers, says Delta, an Orthodox Jew in his late 30s who regularly prays at Azman’s Brodsky Synagogue. He declined to speak about his private life.

Delta, who immigrated to Israel in the 1990s, moved back to Ukraine several years ago and has worked as a businessman. He says he joined the protest movement as a volunteer on November 30, after witnessing violence by government forces against student protesters.

“I saw unarmed civilians with no military background being ground by a well-oiled military machine, and it made my blood boil,” Delta told JTA in Hebrew laced with military jargon.

“I joined them then and there, and I started fighting back the way I learned how, through urban warfare maneuvers. People followed, and I found myself heading a platoon of young men. Kids, really.”

The other ex-IDF infantrymen joined the Blue Helmets later after hearing it was led by a fellow vet, Delta said.

As platoon leader, Delta says he takes orders from activists connected to Svoboda, an ultra-nationalist party that has been frequently accused of anti-Semitism and whose members have been said to have had key positions in organizing the opposition protests.

“I don’t belong [to Svoboda], but I take orders from their team. They know I’m Israeli, Jewish and an ex-IDF soldier. They call me ‘brother,’” he said. “What they’re saying about Svoboda is exaggerated, I know this for a fact. I don’t like them because they’re inconsistent, not because of [any] anti-Semitism issue.”

The commanding position of Svoboda in the revolution is no secret, according to Ariel Cohen, a senior research fellow at the Washington D.C.-based Heritage Foundation think tank.

“The driving force among the so-called white sector in the Maidan are the nationalists, who went against the SWAT teams and snipers who were shooting at them,” Cohen told JTA.

Still, many Jews supported the revolution and actively participated in it.

Earlier this week, an interim government was announced ahead of election scheduled for May, including ministers from several minority groups.

Volodymyr Groysman, a former mayor of the city of Vinnytsia and the newly appointed deputy prime minister for regional policy, is a Jew, Rabbi Azman said.

“There are no signs for concern yet,” said Cohen, “but the West needs to make it clear to Ukraine that how it is seen depends on how minorities are treated.”

On Wednesday, Russian State Duma Chairman Sergey Naryshkin said Moscow was concerned about anti-Semitic declarations by radical groups in Ukraine.

But Delta says the Kremlin is using the anti-Semitism card falsely to delegitimize the Ukrainian revolution, which is distancing Ukraine from Russia’s sphere of influence.

“It’s bullshit. I never saw any expression of anti-Semitism during the protests, and the claims to the contrary were part of the reason I joined the movement. We’re trying to show that Jews care,” he said.

Still, Delta’s reasons for not revealing his name betray his sense of feeling like an outsider. “If I were Ukrainian, I would have been a hero. But for me it’s better to not reveal my name if I want to keep living here in peace and quiet,” he said.

Fellow Jews have criticized him for working with Svoboda. “Some asked me if instead of ‘Shalom’ they should now greet me with a ‘Sieg heil.’ I simply find it laughable,” he said. But he does have frustrations related to being an outsider. “Sometimes I tell myself, ‘What are you doing? This is not your army. This isn’t even your country.’”

He recalls feeling this way during one of the fiercest battles he experienced, which took place last week at Institutskaya Street and left 12 protesters dead. “The snipers began firing rubber bullets at us. I fired back from my rubber-bullet rifle,” Delta said.

“Then they opened live rounds, and my friend caught a bullet in his leg. They shot at us like at a firing range. I wasn’t ready for a last stand. I carried my friend and ordered my troops to fall back. They’re scared kids. I gave them some cash for phone calls and told them to take off their uniform and run away until further instructions. I didn’t want to see anyone else die that day.”

Currently, the Blue Helmets are carrying out police work that include patrols and preventing looting and vandalism in a city of 3 million struggling to climb out of the chaos that engulfed it for the past three months.

But Delta has another, more ambitious, project: He and Azman are organizing the airborne evacuation of seriously wounded protesters — none of them Jewish — for critical operations in Israel.

One of the patients, a 19-year-old woman, was wounded at Institutskaya by a bullet that penetrated her eye and is lodged inside her brain, according to Delta. Azman says he hopes the plane of 17 patients will take off next week, with funding from private donors and with help from Ukraine’s ambassador to Israel.

“The doctor told me that another millimeter to either direction and she would be dead,” Delta said. “And I told him it was the work of Hakadosh Baruch Hu.” (What that means?)

Note 1: Independent Ukrain, after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, was one of the “friendliest” States to Israel. What Israel asked was a demand to be granted quickly and obediently.

West Ukrain has been historically closely tied to Germany and most of them consider themselves Teutons. They rallied Nazi Germany when the troops invaded Russia in late 1942, and they committed the worst atrocities against the Russians and Jews.

Why Israel has sent troops disguised as reservists to lead armed groups during the recent uprising?

And why Israel is now voicing apprehension that the 200,000 Jews in Ukrain might be facing “hate treatments” if a civil war breaks in this part of Ukrain?

Note 2: Can we interpret this uprising in Ukrain as tightly linked to the Syrian uprising?

Is the USA trying to pressure Russia for a few concessions and further compromises in Syria?

In any case, it does not stand to reason that Putin will allow the thousands of Islamic “terrorist” Chechen fighting in Syria to converge to bordering regions of Russia.

Ukrain needed the urgent attention of Merkel of Germany in order to ward off lingering troubles on its backyard. Instead of visiting Israel with 17 members of her government, Merkel should have been visiting Kiev and stayed there until a political resolution was finalized.

Merkel’s staunch strategy that Germany policies should be centered on the USA might have side tracked her from more pragmatic ties with Russia, the historical extension of Germany.

Now Merkel is loaded with a long lasting crisis, as bad as the Euro crisis.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Blog Stats

  • 1,428,654 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 776 other followers

%d bloggers like this: