Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Charles Corm

Illustrious and immortal personalities: The Phoenician masters…

Masters in architecture, engineering, cosmology, astronomy, philosophy, literature, history writing, agriculture, viticulture, food preservation, textile, dying…

1. Mochos the Sidonian, the geographer who wrote “Sacred Annals”.

Poseidonius believed that the concept of Atoms originated with Mochus

The Greek geographer Strabo (1st century AD) wrote:

“The Sidonians are skilled in beautiful arts, philosophy, sciences, astronomy, arithmetic… These sciences have come to the Greek and Egytians from the Phoenicians…”

2. Sanchuniaton of Berytus (Beirut)  wrote “Phoenicia History” and is credited as the “Father of History“, centuries before Herodotus

3. Pythagoras mother was Phoenician and she sailed from the island of Samus to Lebanon Afka Temple in order for her son to receive the lustral consecration (baptized according to the rite that is still performed in Lebanon).

4. At least 11 tragic plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides have subject matter and characters featuring Phoenician connection and references. These plays appeal to the loftiest and noblest virtues of the soul.

5. Clitomachus-Asdrubal (called Hasdrubal of Carthage) chaired Plato Academy in Athens

6. Philodemus of Gadara wrote “On Music”

7. Porphyrius of Tyre  wrote “Treatise on the soul” and the commentaries on “The Dialogue of Plato“.  He was for Plotinus, Aristotle and Homer what Plato Plato was to Socrates.

8. The French Combes-Dounou (1802) translated the 43 essays of Maximus of Tyre (70-130 AD)

9. Herrenius Philo of Byblos wrote “On cities and their famous men”,  “On Books”, and “History of Adrian”

10. Appolonius of Tyre (60 BC) is the stoic philosopher who provided a “Tabulated account of the philosophers of the school of Zeno and their books”

11. Mago of Carthage wrote the masterful 28 volumes on agriculture “Treatise on Agriculture” and considered by the Romans as the “Father of Agriculture”

12. Longinus wrote “On the Sublime”

13. Nonnus wrote “Dionysiaca”

14. Melodious Romanos is considered the “Pindar of rhythmic poetry”

15. Nemesianus of Carthage wrote “Nautica”

16. Lucius Apuleinus of Madaura (125-180 AD) wrote fables in “Psyche” and “The Golden Ass”

17. Thales of Miletus was born and raised in one of Phoenicia city-State on the coast of current Turkey.

18. The Phoenicians built the city-State of Thebes in Greece, 3 centuries before Athens existed. This famous city generated the illustrious Amphion, Hesiod, Corinna, Pindar, Epaminondas, Plutarch

19. Three out of the 7 Greek Wise-men were Phoenicians, and among them was Thales of Miletus.

The Pre-Homeric poetry was discovered in Ras Shamra (ancient city of Ugarit). Cyrus Gordon wrote in 1929:

“The greatest literature discovered since deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs and Mesopotamian cuneiform…”

Actually, the mythical stories in Homers’s work were Phoenician stories in how they discovered the seas and oceans

Note: Read “6,000 years of peaceful contribution to mankind” by late Charles Corm

Masters in Agriculture, Wine and Beer making, Food preservation, Textile, Dying, paper production… The Phoenicians

It is reported that Marcus Porcius Cato the Elder, after visiting Carthage and returning to Rome with the most exquisite and delightful crops of the orchards in Carthage, he exclaimed with raging indignation:

“Carthage is back to its former glory and power. I am of the opinion that Carthage must be destroyed…”

And Carthage was sacked in 149 BC, let burn for 17 days, and perishing 50,000 inhabitants…

The Roman senate ordered to retrieve from the ruins the 28 volumes of Mago masterful “Treatise on Agriculture”.

This treatise of the “Father of Agriculture” was translated into Latin. The Phoenicians considered agriculture as a precise science.

The Roman scholar Silanus translated the chief parts of the volumes.

St. Augustine, who spoke the still living Punic tongue in the 4th century AC, wrote: “On the word of many scholars, there was a great deal of virtue and wisdom in the Punic books…”

Even in the 20th century, many illustrious chemists did their best to decode the Phoenician purple color  and their dying processes and failed.

The Phoenician textile industry was traded in every corner of the world, and silk, and cotton were common elements in the fabrics…

Papyrus and paper are derivation of the Phoenician term babir, and the City-State of Byblos, renowned for book production gave birth to  Bible, bibliotheca, bibliography…

The Roman Strabo wrote:

“In Sidon and Tyre, one could learn astronomy and arithmetic, which are necessary for navigation… And one could also study all branches of philosophy…”

Paul Valery wrote in “Architecture, 1923”: “This audacious Phoenician ceaselessly agitated the Ocean…

When archaeologists and paleontologists … claim that mankind civilization has the Near East as its hotbed, they mean:

“The Phoenician and Chaldean immigrated everywhere around the world and traded their goods, language, alphabet, industries… and left their imprint of high level civilization to future generations of mankind…”

Note 1:  Colonized the Americas? https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/evidences-the-phoenicians-colonized-the-americas-and-new-zealand-part-3/

Note 2: Inspired from “6,000 years of peaceful contribution to mankind” by late Charles Corm 

Baalbek: The most majestic Temple of all times

The Temple of Baalbek in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon was built more than 1,500 years before the City-State of Rome was constructed, and over 1,000 years before the City-State of Athens emerged.

Andre Geiger maintains that “Both the Acropolis in Athens and the Coliseum in Rome, combined, pale in comparison with the majesty and splendor of Baalbek…”

The Temple of Baalbek is one of mankind history of the loftiest acts and achievement, and it was built by the Canaanites and Phoenician engineering ingenuity and spiritual life-style.

The platform upon which sits the monument is 400-meter-long, 300-m-wide, and 20 meters high.

The Trilithon (the 3 foundation stones)  rise 7 meters, and each stone measuring 4 m-high and 19 m-long. Of the remaining 48 columns that make up the grand temple’s peristyle, the last 6 standing columns feature 19 m high drums, with 3 m-high capitals and a 5-m-high architrave.

Thus, if we add the 20 m-high platform to the 29 m-high of the column, we get  a total of 49 m-high sight.

The colossal square stone, referred to as the “pregnant lady” has the dimensions: 21.5 m by 4 m by 5 m-thick.  This smooth stone totals 433 cubic-meter and weight more than 1,000 metric ton. It requires the strength of 40,000 men to move this stone.

The overall plan of its infrastructure, its architectural scope, the scale of its design and the cyclopean size of the body, especially in the major segments of the foundations, attest to the Phoenician ingenuity.to a religious architectural style, referred to as “Semite”.

It is the same style of the Temple of Eryx in west Sicily, and the same style of the small Temple of Solomon and the Great Mosque in Damascus.

The main features are outdoor courtyards, open-air inner courtyards, side sections reserved for sacrificial rites, purification rituals, covered walkways, special aisles for the faithful, and a “holy of hollies” ensconced in a hidden recess of the sanctuary, reserved for the cult’s dignitaries and initiates.

The inner layout and discrete functionality, the basic floor-plans… are intimately related

It is reported that Solomon commissioned the Phoenicians to build on the site of Baalbek a private shrine, set slightly apart from the main temple.  This shrine was dedicated in the Song of Songs “Come with me from Lebanon, my bride, come with me from my favorite Lebanon…”

It is not plausible that the Romans decided to build the most majestic of monuments at the confine of its empire, thousands of miles from Rome. It is like France building Versailles in Ouagadougou (Africa) or in the Huran province in south Syria.

The Roman Emperor who restored Baalbek in the mid 3rd century AD was from Syria by origin. And it happened that Rome was planning its biggest celebration of the millennium of its founding.

In order to feel free from wars for this celebration, the Roman emperor made a deal with Persia and paid yearly tax. And the Best monuments in the Empire were restored and refurbished. And Baalbek was the Jewel monument, closest to Persia.

This splendid and spectacular work must have taken decades to finish. It is the culmination of a long-term joint venture, a peace treaty, signed by rich empires, who kept their words, and the monument was a clause in the treaty in order to worship the same Gods, and respect the customs and traditions…

Note 1: All temples in antiquity, including the temples in Greece and Rome emulated the Phoenician style. The Greek and Romans also copied the open-air amphitheaters and race tracks of the Phoenician city-states. The race track in Tyre is a living witness, and dating back to 200 BC, when it was no longer a mighty city.

Note 2: “6,000 years of peaceful contribution to mankind” by late Charles Corm

Note 3: The Phoenicians built the City-State of Thebes in Greece, capital of Boeotia 300 years before Athens emerged as a city. Alexander destroyed Thebes because it refused to acknowledge him king of Greece. It is reported that Alexander ordered that the house of Dionysus is left intact. Why? During a visit of Alexander to Athens, he approached this philosopher who lived in a barrel and asked him “How can I be of help?”. The philosopher replied “Just step aside. Your shadow is blocking my sun”

6,000 years of Peaceful Contribution to Mankind” by late Charles Corm

In 1934, the US Jesuit priests Ewing and Doberty discovered the Jeita Grotto in Lebanon. And 20 meters deep in the rubble, they found a skeleton of a 10 year-old that they christened Egbert. The features of the skeleton, of 50,000 years ago, had the same modern physical features of current mankind.

6,000 years ago, as the neighboring civilizations built houses out of clay bricks and mud blocks, the people in Byblos used stones, excavated from quarry hard rock.

The stones house was held by 7 stone pillars: 3 pillars embedded in the stonewall on each side, and the 7th pillar installed smack in the middle, acting as buttress to the 6 pillars by means of wooden beans… Thus, this dictum of “The 7 pillars of wisdom

The French archeologists Dunant and Pierson explain this usage of the 7 pillars of wisdom as a symbolic example of perfection.

The Phoenicians discovered the North Star, which the Greeks christened “The Phoenician”

1. The maritime periplus of Hanno:

This Carthage admiral (500 BC) explored the western coast of Africa and reached Cameroon, and established 300 colonies or trading posts.

Hanno loaded 6 galleys of 500 mariners each and crossed the Straits of Gibraltar, moved beyond Senegal, Liberia, Nigeria and up to Cameroon. The volcano of Mount Cameroon, the only active volcano along this coast line, was in eruption and the fumes formed a “Chariot” shape. Hanno called it “Kamour Ayoun” or (Chariot of the Gods).

This expedition met with gorillas and they named them “N’Ghoril” or the “hairy man”

A few of the colonies were Tangiers, Agadir, Acra, Arambys, Cerne, Roxo, Noun, Gytte

Names such as Hani (Hani Baal), Hanoun, Hnein and Honein refer to Hanno

2. The maritime periplus of Himilco:

Himilco set out from Carthage around 500 BC and reached England, Ireland (Holy Island), and the Baltic Sea

The Isles of Scilly (south England) is still called Cassiterides (from Kasdir or Tin, where Carthage mined the tin mineral)

Carthage also profited from the “murex” seashells in Neabra-in-Castle and established the purple dye industry. Historian Will Durant argues that “The Phoenicians were nothing if not the Britons of antiquity…”

The German archeologist Heinrich Schliemann (1822-1890) stressed that the Phoenicians’ amber necklaces found in Tirynsian tombs were genuine and authentic amber of Baltic provenance.

Actually, many Baltic cities in Medieval period made their fortune trading amber that conferred initial magnetic shudder named “electrum”

3. The maritime periplus of Necho around the Cape of Good Hope

Pharaoh Necho II (610-595) dispatched a Phoenician expedition from the Red Sea, down the Indian Ocean, and around Africa continent, and back to Egypt through the Mediterranean Sea.

The sailors claimed they had the sun on their right side in one portion of the periplus instead of the left side.

(The southern stretch of Africa reaches below the Equator before the sun rises back to the left toward the Gulf of Guinea on the Atlantic Ocean).

They circumnavigated the African continent, thousand of years before the Portuguese and Spanish mariners

Victor Berard (1864-1931) argued that the “Odyssee” of Homer was based on a traditional Phoenician periplus

As the Chaldean reached the Americas from the East (through the Pacific Ocean), the Phoenician landed in South and North America westward through the Atlantic Ocean, thousands of years before the European colonialists.

The Phoenician reached Americas in two directions:

1. The distance from Cape Verde (west Africa) to the eastern tip of Brazil is much shorter from Tyr to the Straights of Gibraltar or from Carthage to Cameroon. The vessels floated adrift, taking advantage of trade winds blowing in an oblique direction around the tropic.

2. From Portugal to the Gulf of Mexico, the Gulf Stream drifted the vessels.

There are similarities in the customs, rituals and solar/cosmic cults… among the Phoenician and Aztecs, Mayas, and Incas civilizations

Traces of Phoenician 22 alphabetical letter characters were identified in Brazil, Mexico, Urugway, and the USA (the Susquehanna Stones…

The next posts will provide additional proofs from Venezuela, Brazil, Polynesia, New Zealand, Tahiti, Hawaii, Samoa and the Bering Strait

A few of the cities that the Phoenicians established along the eastern coastline of the Mediterranean Sea:

1. On current Syria: Ras Shamra, Gabala, Paltos, Balaneae, Antaradus, Aradus, Maratus..

2. On current Palestine coast: Ace, Ptolemais, Gaba, Dora, Paneas (Caesarea of Philippi)…,

3. Inland of Syria: Apamea

Note: Part 1 https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/09/24/the-most-ancient-and-intrepid-mariners-the-chaldean-of-the-near-east/

The most ancient and intrepid mariners: The Chaldean of the Near East

The Chaldeans are the people who inhabited the Near East region of current Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine.

Their civilization is traced for 6,000 years as people who first settled in City-States and roamed the rivers and seas.

They are mostly known as establishing several empires in Iraq such as Ur, Akkad, and Babylon… and establishing trade outposts (turned City-States) along the coast of the Arabic/Persia Gulf, Persia, India, and the Far East.

The Delta of Basra, where the mighty two rivers of Tigres and Euphrates meet, was their starting adventure in trading with neighboring countries

Several renowned archeologists confirm that the Chaldean mariners reached America (North and South) from two main directions.

1. The first route was along the Pacific Polynesian Islands and New Zealand all the way to Peru… (Prof. A.H. Keane)

2. The second route was through the Bering Strait at a point between Alaska and Kamchatka Peninsulas (Archeologist Hume Bolden)

The descendents of the Chaldeans on the western sea shores are the Phoenicians, extending their streak of City-States from Acre, Tyr, Sidon, Byblos,  Tripoli, Arwad, Ugarit, Izmir… all the way along the Turkish sea-shore and on to the Black Sea.

The Phoenicians were the master of all the Mediterranean Sea for 12 centuries and built 70 trading outposts or cities along the shores and traded in the Black Sea.

1, In Tripoli they had Sabratha and Lepis Magna

2. In Tunisia: Utica (Old city), Carthage (Kart Hadasht or New City), and Hadrumete

3. In Algeria: Rachgoun, Circa, Hippone

4. In Morocco: Lixus, and Mogador

5. In Spain: Cadiz (tin mine city) Cerrodel del Villar, Toscano, Charreras, Malaga and Adra

6. In France: Massalia (Marseille)

7. In Sardegna: Tharros, Sulcis and Nora

8. In Sicily: Motye

9. In Crete: Tarsus and Tekke

10. Cyprus

11. Malta…

The French President Georges Bidault delivered this keynote address to the UNESCO General Assembly”

“The Phoenicians have set the example and given a valuable lesson on how to go beyond the Mediterranean Sea basin… Thanks to them, the sea has ceased to be the abyss and was rendered a roadway…

Thanks to the Phoenicians, inquiry, discovery, industry, and progress have become accessible and feasible…”

Short description of the maritime periplus of the mariners Hanno (around Africa), Ophir, Himilco (Amber of the Baltic), and Necho (Cape of Good Hope)… will be posted in a follow-up article.

It is to be noted that the other branch of the Chaldeans were the Canaanites who settled inland and built the city-states of Askelon, Jerusalem, Damascus, Hama ,Mari, and Aleppo… along with many cities on the Euphrates and Al Assy Orontes Rivers.

As the Chaldean reached the Americas from the East (through the Pacific Ocean), the Phoenician landed in South and North America westward through the Atlantic Ocean, thousands of years before the European colonialists. Read part 2  https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/10/02/6000-years-of-peaceful-contribution-to-mankind-by-late-charles-corm/

Note 1:  One of the sources  “6,000 years of peaceful contributions to mankind” by Charles Corm

Note 2: Zenon or Zeno, founder of the Stoic philosophy https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2011/07/17/phoenicia-who-is-zenon-of-kition/

I am a public figure; (Jan. 22, 2010)

Consider this situation: I died.  Years later, hundreds of readers are still patronizing my Adonis49 blog every day; as if I am alive and going strong.  How that for a whiff of eternity?

Lebanese author Charles Corm in 1949: “Once your writing goes into print then your moral liberty is restricted: it entered the domain of others’ moral values and you have to take responsibility of what you published”.

Thus, there is a difference between writing for your own pleasure and publishing.  Publishing your work carries a public function that you are doomed to shoulder.

There is no such thing as publishing for “Art sake”: if you have to publish, at least have a political position that has germinated since every thought, idea, or action disseminated to the public connote a political undertone.

There is always an implicit mission that permeates the published work.

An abbot wrote in 1771 “We have got to steadfastly refrain from writing.  If we have to write then it better be worthier than silence”.

The need to commune with the reader presumes a good level of honesty and a will to care. The ultimate mission is to communicate personal struggles;.

For example, how you overcame shortcomings, the attempts and challenges that obstructed your journey to personal discoveries, and the many ways to succumb to our frailties and limitations: there is an implicit purpose to express and describe the journey since we don’t need to reach the goal as long as we are on the journey’s track.

Are there messages from the past that we have short-cut subconsciously in our frenzied strife to advance in the future?

Many say that we write for “ a moment of eternity”.  If that is true then what you wrote was the honest final confession.

How come your final confession keeps succeeding for years to come?  Are you an immortal sinner?

Communicate heart and courage in what you publish.

Convey the urge to proceed in discovering your nature; otherwise, why the bother?

If you are not an “expert” in the subject matter then try not to extend resolutions: leave it to the reader to reflect on the “problematic”.

First, if your solution is meant to flatter the reader then you are necessarily a demagogue and your credibility will be tarnished.

Second, if you mean to provoke the reader into reflecting on the problem then you better be cognizant on the varied leverages and facts; communicate the facts and several alternative resolutions and let the reader decide on his own.

Do you want effect? Then, let your title expresses the intended affects; then, structure your article and learn to write well.

Victor Hugo said: “Light is in the book”.  Let reading lights your path.

Do you publish on WordPress? Then, you are a public figure; (Jan. 22, 2010)

            “Once your writing goes into print then your moral liberty is restricted: it entered the domain of others’ moral values and you have to take responsibility of what you published” wrote the Lebanese author Charles Corm in 1949.  Thus, there is a difference between writing for your own pleasure and publishing.  Publishing your work carries a public function that you are doomed to shoulder. There is no such thing as publishing for “Art sake”: if you have to publish then, at least, have a political position that has germinated since every thought, idea, or action disseminated to the public connote a political undertone. There is always an implicit mission that permeates the published work.

            An abbot wrote in 1771 “We have got to steadfastly refrain from writing.  If we have to write then it better be worthier than silence”.  The need to commune with the reader presumes a good level of honesty and a will to care. The ultimate mission is to communicate personal struggles; how you overcame shortcomings, the attempts and challenges that obstructed your journey to personal discoveries, and the many ways to succumb to our frailties and limitations: there is an implicit purpose to express and describe the journey since we don’t need to reach the goal as long as we are on the journey’s track.

            Are there messages from the past that we shortcutted subconsciously in our frenzied strife to advance in the future?  Many say that we write for “a moment of eternity”.  If that is true then what you wrote was the honest final confession.  How come your final confession keeps succeeding for years to come?  Are you an immortal sinner?  If you cannot communicate heart and courage in what you publish and how you proceed to discover your nature then why the bother?

If you are not an “expert” in the subject matter then try not to extend resolutions: leave it to the reader to reflect on the “problematic”.  First, if your solution is meant to flatter the reader then you are necessarily a demagogue and your credibility will be tarnished.  Second, if you mean to provoke the reader into reflecting on the problem then you better be cognizant on the varied leverages and facts; communicate the facts and several alterative resolutions and let the reader decide on his own. Do you want effect? The, let your title expresses the intended effect; then, structure your article and learn to write well.

            Victor Hugo said: “Light is in the book”.  Let reading lights your path.


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