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Posts Tagged ‘charts

Posters And Charts That Graphic Designers Will Relate To

Rana Abou Rjeily shared a link of  

Katy Cowan <katy@creativeboom.com>

Note: After so many years of posting this article, the supposed author of this shared link is asking me to remove it, for no reasons whatsoever. If you have liked this link, tell me if it is appropriate to remote it. It is also your right to give me your feedback
We at DS come across a lot of memes, comics and artworks that offer a hilarious look into the life and mind of a graphic designer.
So we thought, why not collate a digitalsynopsis.com

Who knows, it might even drive some sense into an unreasonable client and make him/her change his/her attitude?

1.

How would you like your graphic design? Pick two - fast, cheap, great or free (venn diagram)

2.

The Designer Vs The Client

3.

Designer Vs Regular People

4.

The Creative Process = Work Begins > Procrastination > Panic > Crying > Deadline

5.

Life of a graphic designer - what everyone thinks I do

6.

Every time you stretch a font, somewhere, a designer cries.

7.

Walked into a very expensive restaurant, sat down, was handed a menu. Comic Sans. Got up and left. Life is hard.

8.

Everything looks official with tiny leaves around it. False, it only works if you use a good serif font.

9.

Things aren't always #000000 and #FFFFFF

10.

How to piss off your designer friends and give them a migraine.

11.

Don't use that tone with me (Pantone)

12.

What kind of a client do you want?

13.

Yo Momma is a shitty designer

14.

Keming - The result of improper kerning

15.

I shot the serif

16.

This is for using comic sans

17.

I'm very font of you because you're just my type.

18.

If you're having font problems I feel bad for you son, I got 99 fonts but Comic Sans ain't one.

19.

When you can select all the feathers of a morning sparrow without missing a single one, only then will you be able to be a true Photoshop master.

20.

There is always someone willing to do it cheaper

21.

I like my coffee how I like my type: Black

22.

My next tattoo will be "Helvetica" written in Arial. When a woman corrects me on it, I will marry her.

23.

Corporate Graphic Design Guide

24.

Graphic designer parking only. Violators will be Photoshopped.

25.

You can't just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.

26.

Please keep the door closed - Please don't use Comic Sans. We're a Fortune 500 company, not a lemonade stand.

27.

What's thrilling about graphic design?

If we had to pick three, it would be tough, but no. 6, 22 and 26 would be our favourites. What about you? Share this post with a fellow designer and voice your views in the comments below.

Article 33

 “How to tell long and good stories from human factors graphs?”

If we concentrate on a graph we might generate a long story that span many disciplines and furnish us with a wealth of information and knowledge that pages of words cannot convey. A graph might open the gate for dozen of questions that are the foundation of scientific, experimental, and critical thinking.  Suppose that we are comparing the efficiency in energy consumption between walking bare feet or wearing shoes that weight 1.3 Kg.  Considering the walking speed as the other independent variable along with the type and weight of shoes then we observe that the curves show that we are consuming less energy at low speed, then both curves decreasing to a minimum consumption of 0.2 KJ/Nm and intersecting at around 80 meter/min and then increasing as walking speed increases.

This graph is telling us that casual walking consumes less energy per unit walking effort than fast walking and that at a cut off speed of 80 meter/min the energy consumption is equal for both foot wares.  Some people might jump to the conclusion that this cut-off speed can be generalized to all foot wears but more experiments are necessarily needed to verify this initial hypothesis.  Another piece of information is that after the cut-off speed it is more economical energy wise to walk barefoot. Basically, this graph is saying that the more weight you add to your lower limbs the more energy you should expect to spend, a fact that is not an earth shattering observation. Biomechanics tells us that the structure of our body is not geared toward saving on our muscular effort but to increasing our range and speed of movements.  Most of our muscles are connected to the bones of our limbs and their respective joints in manners they have to exert great effort and many fold the weight of our body members to overcome any of our limb’s mass.  Usually, the tendons of our muscles are inserted to the limb bones close to the joints and thus the muscles have to exert a huge effort to overcome the moment of the bone and flesh weight in order to effect a movement. Any extra mass to our limbs will tax our muscles to produce many folds the additional weight.

There is a caveat however; if you wrapped a weight of 1.3 kg around your ankles and walked bare feet you would consume more energy than without the added weight but the curve would be parallel to the previous curve and not increasing more steeply than walking with shoes weighting 1.3 Kg.  Consequently, the variation in the behavior of the graphs result from a combination of added weight and lesser static coefficient of friction exerted by the shoes on the walking surface than the bare foot..

Thus, what this graph does not mention is the static coefficient of friction between the footwear and the ground and which is the most important variable and in this case can concatenate many independent and control variables such as the materials of the footwear and the type of ground into a unique independent variable of coefficient of friction.  The higher the coefficient of friction the easier it is to move and progress and thus walking faster for the same amount of effort invested.  It is not that important to generate muscle force if the reaction force on the surface cannot be produced to move a person in the right direction; for example, it is extremely difficult to move on slippery surfaces no matter how much muscular effort we generate.  Apparently, the shape and skin texture of our foot provide a better and more efficient coefficient of friction than many foot wears.

However, the most important fact of this simple experiment is showing us the behavior of the curves and offering additional hypotheses for other studies.

What this graph is not telling us is the best story of all and which can excite the mind into further investigation. For example, what kind of earth materials are we walking on; sands, asphalt, rough terrains, slippery roads or grassy fields?  Does the sample of bare feet walkers include aboriginals used in walking bare feet, city dwellers, and people from the province?  Does the sample groups people according to the softness of their feet skins or the size of feet?

May be the shape of the curves are the same for females as well but it would be curious to find out the magnitude of variations compared to males.  It is clear that a simple and lousy graph delved us into the problems of experimentation and raised enough questions to attend to various fields of knowledge.

In the final analysis, the question is how relevant is this experiment practically?  How far can a modern man walk bare feet?  Does any economy in energy compensate for the ache, pain and injuries suffered by walking bare feet?  Would athletes be allowed to compete bare feet if it is proven to increase performance and break new records?  Does anyone care of walking barefoot in order to save a few kilo Joules?

The theme of this article is that you can venture into many fields of knowledge just by focusing your attention on graphs and tables and permitting your mind to navigate into uncharted waters through queries and critical thinking.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

September 2020
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