Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘civil war

Wild Goose Chase (fiction, Chapter 17)

Posted on November 24, 2008

Artax troops were leisurely wandering in the Mongol steppes heading east and still hoping to link up with the troops of Iskander who was now on the run.  The most common of news, and the most dreaded, reached Artax:  A successful coup d’etat by one of a more “legitimate” cousin of his.  That renegade cousin claimed the title of “Khosro the Magnificent, the eldest Son-God Incarnate”.   

In his guts, Artax foresaw this kind of turn of events and had hypothetically pondered Khosro immediate reactions on receiving such news, supposing that he was not poisoned or murdered before the reversal of fortune.

As long as the troops believed that Artax was the legitimate Monarch, which means his treasure chest was plenty, then there was hope to prioritize His dreams and desires.

Artax was faced with a serious dilemma. Would he resume discovering new lands and new people or focus on his people?  What are the alternatives?  

If he gathered his army and marched on his cousin then he would be obeying a natural reaction from any monarch and the reaction would agree to his traditional troops.

The Monarch was analyzing a typical reaction that was labeled centuries later “Pavlov Reaction”, but which intrinsically was targeted toward animal reactions after extensive training to a certain behavior.

His army would urge him to march on his cousin anyway; otherwise, he might lose the confidence of his officers and soldiers to his legitimacy.  

Artax decides to keep both options.  

He reasoned that the first angry reactions were beneath a wise and forward thinking monarch.  He will then resume the exploration with a much smaller army: These wastelands up North cannot afford a large expedition anyway. 

He will also regain his throne by other means than direct and frontal assault by armies.  He doesn’t desire to mire his country in a textbook civil war.  

He opts to bifurcate south to any region that is flourishing, fertile and close to His Estate Afghanistan, and settle and refill his treasure chest and lay the ground works for a new Constitution and a Bill of Rights for the Persian Empire.  

We didn’t have GPS locators at the time to offer precise coordinates but Artax troops headed toward what is called now Islamabad.

Most probably Artax had named it Azarabad or the City of the Sun God Azar.  Azarabad was on the Indus River and close to impregnable mountain chains with easily defensible passages.

Worst battles between the Christian forces: The army and the Lebanese “Christian” Forces militia of Samir Geagea

Support movement for General Michel Aoun, currently elected as President of the Republic

The issue of the daily Al Balad, May 9, 2005

Testimonials of the civil war in Lebanon

This is the story of a girl who was 13 years old when the movement of General Aoun started after being appointed Prime Minister in interim, after President Amin Gemayel tenure ended without the election of a President in 1988.

All the Muslim Sunni sect leaders, pressured by Syria, refused to form governments. Aoun had to form his own government with the military.

The girl used to participate in the demonstrations in support of Aoun liberation stand against the occupation of the Syrian forces, and joined her schoolmates visiting the Presidential Palace in Baabda. She also drove there accompanied by her aunt and grand dad.

The Dekwani area where she lived was under the control of the “Lebanese Forces”, which was at the time still allied with one of the divided Lebanese army.

She once wrote a poem to General Michel Aoun and drew the Statue of Liberty depicting the territory of Lebanon where the torch stands.

Later, when the Lebanese army faced the trespasses of the “Lebanese Forces” on Red Lines that separated the  militia forces, and the refusal to evict the port of Beirut, people were forced to take refuge in basements.

The children were separated from adults who needed silence to listen to the radios. 

The trapped citizens would go three days without food.  The main ingredient was lemon because it killed the appetite and boxes of Panadol for headaches.

The girl’s grand dad cooked on a blue alcohol flame which took forever for the cooked food to be ready.

General Aoun gave up the fight as the Syrian air force bombed the presidential Palace on October 13, 1990, with the consent of the US, Israel, and Saudi Kingdom.

The citizens heard the General voice on the radio telling them the situation so that ”we save and keep whatever is left in Lebanon”. 

People wept and started burning the General’s cassettes and pictures for fear that the Syrian might indict them.

After October 13, the girl resumed her studies at the all girl school in Fanar where the Syrian troops installed one of their headquarters.  The girls would not go out to play, especially when rumors spread of mass graves in Beit Mery and Deir Kalaa.

The Syrian soldiers used to walk the playgrounds while the students kept to their classes and they celebrated the remembrance of the independence at Independence Day.

The students began throwing leaflets opposing the Syrian occupation from school buses windows when passing Syrian check points; the consequence was school order to shut all school buses windows during the whole trip home.

The supporters of the General had a code car honking and poster were plastered stating “The General will return” from exile in France.

Note 1: I had returned to the US to resume my PhD program. My parents told me peace has come and you decided to leave again? A month later, the worst battles were engaged between the Lebanese Forces and the army under General Aoun.

I had to rely on the Red Cross to get any news of the safety of my parents who had to keep to the lower floor for over 4 months and stacking bags of dirt on entrances and windows. I received my request from the Red cross 2 weeks later: Parents safe.

Note 2: The Syrian forces remained in Lebanon until 2005, after the assassination of ex-Rafic Hariri PM. The International Court, after 15 years of deliberation, still didn’t extend any convincing decision of “Who assassinated Hariri”. This court ended up stating that Syria was Not behind this assassination. As if we, the Lebanese, didn’t know that the US/Germany and Israel were the planners of this “sophisticated” execution.

Beirut was a Movable Fair before the onset of the civil war in 1975

With a strong currency (1$ worth 2 Lebanese pound) and a low cost of living before the onset of civil war in 1975, Beirut was a movable fair for the common people, those living and commuting to Beirut.

Actually, during most of the civil war period, the  LP remained strong due to the massive reserves of hard currencies of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), from the massive infusion of Gulf Arab States, Saudi Kingdom and Libya…

I recall, while at the university, (1970-75) that I could live for an entire day on barely 2 LP for the cost of Taxis, buses, watching movies, going to theaters, eating and drinking fresh juices and joining daily student demonstrations, marches and sit-in demanding reforms in Lebanon political system.

You may read my memoirs on these wonderful period on https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2019/09/05/movable-fairs-in-beirut-1971-74/

What follows is an article posted by a French woman, a foreigner in 2016, who was overwhelmed by a faked sense of sustainable fair in Beirut. She was taken care of by those 1% “rich” people who kept looting the budget and lived on inherited wealth. Though she was aware of the precarious conditions of this political system and resurgence of violence at any moment.

Beyrouth est une fête

Katherine Pancol. Écrivain

Jean C. El Dahdah shared this link. February 19, 2016

Ça y est! Je reprends goût à la vie! Alors, que vous raconter?

Que le Liban est une bouteille de champagne posée sur un volcan et qu’à Beyrouth, la fête est perpétuelle, frénétique comme une avance que les habitants prennent sur la vie et le prochain conflit…

Les Libanais sont les gens les plus accueillants, les plus affectueux, les plus gais, les plus entreprenants, les plus insouciants, les plus généreux du monde.

La vie, ils l’inventent à chaque minute de peur qu’on ne la leur confisque.

Ils ont cette intuition terrible: la guerre peut surgir n’importe quand, alors vivons pleinement, aimons, dansons, buvons du café noir, du café blanc, fumons de longs narguilés, ouvrons des boutiques, des restaurants, construisons, traînons dans les rues, faisons des carnavals, inventions, célébrons, oublions les feux rouges, l’interdiction de fumer, vivons, vivons, vivons…

Beyrouth est une fête.

Ils ne savent pas d’où le danger va surgir pour leur tomber sur la tête.

Le Liban est une immense boîte à lettres où chaque pays voisin fait passer un message en posant des bombes, en assassinant, en écharpant…

Ce ne sont pas les Libanais qui font la guerre, ce sont les pays autour qui se font la guerre via le Liban. (Le plus souvent Executer par des Libanais)

J’étais allée au Liban une première fois, il y a douze ans. Le pays était alors en pleine reconstruction… après une guerre.

Des gratte-ciel surgissaient au milieu des décombres, des camions déblayaient des tonnes de gravats, les façades étaient criblées de balles, on apercevait, béants au soleil, des bouts de cuisine, de salle de bains, de chambre à coucher, la poussière s’élevait en gros nuages gris qui montaient vers un ciel toujours bleu… et les voitures klaxonnaient, klaxonnaient!

( I returned to Lebanon on Christmas of 2000, and the reconstruction was already over and many people lost their jobs, and the vital Beirut Center was monopolized and changed to accommodate the rich visitors and tourists of the rich “Arabs”. Old Beirut was totally erased, even its memorable specialized and Not expensive Souks)

J’avais déjà été frappée par l’énergie qui vibrait dans l’air. On pouvait la saisir à pleines mains et en faire des éclairs.

Douze ans après (et après bien d’autres guerres!), Beyrouth est toujours debout, les buildings en verre lèchent le ciel, des rues montent et descendent comme à San Francisco délimitant un vieux quartier et des quartiers de luxe, des quartiers d’affaires, des rues du soir, des rues de la nuit, des rues qui grouillent, grouillent.

Tout le monde se mélange à Beyrouth et, semble t-il, dans la bonne humeur…

C’est une impression, je ne suis pas restée assez longtemps, mais je n’ai ressenti aucune tension entre les différentes communautés.

Il y a des femmes en mini-jupes et des femmes voilées, des hommes en djellaba et d’autres en costume cravate et tout le monde vit ensemble.

J’ai couru au Musée de Beyrouth voir les statuettes des guerriers phéniciens…

De longues et minces silhouettes semblables à des Giacometti.

J’ai appris à traverser les rues en étendant le bras, en joignant les mains, en cambrant les reins tel le torero face au noir taureau dans l’arène, en suppliant qu’on ne m’écrase pas!

Il faut ployer, sautiller, frôler la tôle, feinter et passer… pour rejoindre des trottoirs qui font office de garde-meubles, garages, dernier salon où l’on cause.

J’ai compris que les feux rouges sont faits pour être brûlés (Not to abide by the color), sauf les “importants” où l’on consent à s’arrêter, les cigarettes à griller dans tous les restaurants et la vitesse à être constamment dépassée…

J’ai bu du café turc sur la Corniche au bord de la mer. On était en novembre, il faisait 28′  et la mer me chatouillait les pieds.

J’ai marché dans les rues avec Rachid El Daïf, un auteur libanais qui a écrit un très bon roman paru chez Actes Sud, “Qu’elle aille au diable, Meryl Streep!”, et nous sommes allés nous poser dans les jardins du café Al Rawda…

J’ai parlé avec Tania, éditrice, qui se bat pour sauver les vieilles maisons de Beyrouth de la convoitise des spéculateurs immobiliers, avec Katya qui peint, j’ai déjeuné au People avec Dédy, un ami tombé dans les livres quand il était petit, dîné avec Émile, librairie chez Virgin, j’ai été invitée partout, partout et chaque fois, reçue les bras grands ouverts et la gourmandise aux lèvres.

Les Libanais sont curieux, raffinés, cosmopolites.

Ils commencent une phrase en arabe, la truffent de mots anglais et français, parlent avec les cheveux, les mains, les yeux

Le soir de mon arrivée, j’ai dîné à la même table avec des Libanais de toutes familles: des chrétiens, des musulmans, des chiites, des sunnites, des maronites, des druzes, des catholiques, des orthodoxes, des riches, des pauvres, des bons vivants, des austères, des grands, des petits, et ils parlaient tous sans s’écharper.

De la Palestine et d’Israël, des USA et de l’Arabie Saoudite et pas une minute, ils n’en sont venus aux mains! J’imaginais le même dîner en France…

Je suis allée avec Dédy à Saïda visiter un vieux palais, le palais Debbané, niché en plein souk, une ancienne maison familiale où une pièce entière est dévolue à de gigantesques volières disposées de chaque coté et j’ai imaginé des concerts d’oiseaux en stéréo!

Nous avons visité le musée du savon Audi, toujours dans le souk, une résidence magnifique où l’on déroule pour vous toute l’histoire de la fabrication du savon… et un caravansérail, construit par des Français au moment des Croisades.

Sur la terrasse d’un restaurant face au Château des Croisés qui s’avance dans la mer, j’ai pensé à Joséphine et au XII ème siècle! Elle me racontait des histoires de Croisés qui ont fait souche, de Croisés qui ont péri, de Croisés qui ont pillé, de Croisés qui ont construit et je l’écoutais, ébahie.

Toutes les notes que j’avais prises pour les recherches de Joséphine revenaient et se mélangeaient aux images de Saïda et de la forteresse…

Au retour, nous nous sommes arrêtés dans une orangeraie et une femme a pressé des oranges, des pamplemousses, des mandarines et des citrons rien que pour nous. Il y avait des jouets d’enfants répandus sous une tonnelle, du linge qui séchait, des figues ventrues, un vieux jardinier, des arbres ployaient sous les fruits, des rigoles irriguaient le pied des arbres… Le temps s’est arrêté.

On se parlait avec les mains, avec les yeux et c’était délicieux…

Vous avez compris, j’ai aimé le Liban. Beaucoup, beaucoup.

C’est un pays de lumière où la vie pétille et chante… une belle leçon de courage et de bonne humeur!

Note: You were a visitor Katheirne and from a western country to boot it. Don’t be fooled by the sincerity and welcoming attitudes. In any case, you didn’t stay long enough to discover the precarity of most Lebanese. The Lebanese have changed for the worst in all aspects, but Not in their sectarian identity and zeal for their feudal/sectarian leaders.

Tidbits #45

Civil war underway in the US due to lingering indignity and latent racism. On May 25, George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, begging for his life with a police officer’s kneeling on his neck. On March 13, EMT Breonna Taylor was shot to death by police officers who burst into the wrong apartment. In February, jogger Ahmaud Arbery was killed by two vigilantes.

Unfortunately, car pollution are exactly the emissions that are likely to rebound after lockdown orders are lifted. (Though who will return to air transport, except those private airplanes of the elite classes?)

The Navajo nation has the highest Covid-19 infection and death rates of any group in the US, as the federal government fails to provide them with adequate information and resources. Young adults in the community have taken it upon themselves to launch information campaigns to try to protect their elders, who carry the most language and cultural knowledge, Mona Gable reports for STAT.

Most of what we grow in this country (corn, soybeans…) is not food exactly, but rather feed for animals and the building blocks from which fast food, snacks, soda, and all the other wonders of food processing, such as high-fructose corn syrup, are manufactured.

Before the Covid-19 pandemics: The White House releases its $4.8 trillion budget proposal expected to seek cuts to social safety net programs and foreign aid, while also requesting $2 billion in new funding for border-wall construction.

Sadiq Khan, mayor of London ordered a review of the city’s landmarks. A commission will look into statues, street names, and plaques that reflect Britain’s violent colonial expansion.It is an uncomfortable truth that our nation and city owes a large part of its wealth to its role in the slave trade,” he said.

An underestimate, due to the way that government statistical agencies collect data,.  Data show that blacks in the US have 10 times less wealth, are 20% more likely to be unemployed, and make 78% as much in weekly wages as whites.

Major surveys all exclude the more than two million Americans who are incarcerated and 90% of inmates are men. Since black Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than whites, and twice as likely as Hispanics, this has the effect of making it appear that African Americans are better off financially than they really are.

Is it a matter of perception on Loneliness? Some people need extended periods of time alone to recharge, others would rather give themselves electric shocks than spend a few minutes with their thoughts.

“If you don’t spend a dime, free entry, drinks, and dinners… and you got a lot of money and you spend a lot…that’s power. It signal recognition of a person’s social worth”. Thus, only the common people have to pay for the VIP clan?

How many years must a slave toil, be humiliated and degraded before a colonial power sinks in the gutter?

Mama. I can’t breath…Last words of George Floyd before he suffocated

These are the last words of George Floyd, a 46-year-old man who died as a US police officer pinned him down, kneeling on his neck for 7 minutes, until he suffocated:

“It’s my face man
I didn’t do nothing serious man
please
please
please I can’t breathe
please man
please somebody
please man
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
please
(inaudible)
man can’t breathe, my face
just get up
I can’t breathe
please (inaudible)
I can’t breathe sh*t
I will
I can’t move
mama
mama
I can’t
my knee
my nuts
I’m through
I’m through
I’m claustrophobic
my stomach hurt
my neck hurts
everything hurts
some water or something
please
please
I can’t breathe officer
don’t kill me
they gon’ kill me man
come on man
I cannot breathe
I cannot breathe
they gon’ kill me
they gon’ kill me
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
please sir
please
please
please I can’t breathe”

Then his eyes shut and the pleas stop. George Floyd was pronounced dead shortly after.

Right now, we have a choice. This can just be one more tragic death at the hands of US police — or the moment for change.

Note 1: George didn’t commit anything wrong. He just asked a girl to put a leash on her dog. The girl called the police…

Note 2: This time around, it is civil war until the entire Trump administration resign and an early election is decided.

How happy are those who were “saved” from a civil war?

Note: Re-edit of “Very happy I am; very lucky, indeed! (January 5, 2009)”

Note:  This article is extracted from the epilogue of “Thus Spoken the Killer” by Nasri Sayegh; the epilogue is entitled “Fuck it

Very happy the individual who emerges from a civil war with a simple insult on barricades; who received just a slap, a box, or a vengeful wait on barricades.

Very happy who escaped a civil war and was robbed a bundle of bread or his car trunk was vandalized.

Very happy whose wife’s body was just checked by fretful fingers, who was threatened to be beaten but was spared a beating, or by death or by kidnapping but these threats never materialized.

Very happy who was warned to vacate his house and obeyed gladly.

Very happy who was just fired from a job on confessional basis but survived a civil war.

Terribly lucky that you were kidnapped or made prisoner and returned safe and sound to your family.

Terribly lucky who you were estimated on any value for prisoner exchange, or because you were utterly worthless to waste a bullet in your head.

Terribly lucky that a bomb went off or a car explosion and it spared you of shrapnel.

Awfully lucky that you kept your property intact by bribing the appropriate leader.

Awfully lucky that only one of the members of your family was injured.

How lucky you were that a family lived in your vacated property and kept it decently maintained.

How lucky that you were out with your family when a missile hit your home.

How lucky that you found someone to whisk you out of a dangerous zone or you were a foreign national and were shipped out safely with your compatriots in identity paper.

You should have been grateful that you were allowed to be handed the body of a relative and that you managed to give him a proper burial.

How courageous you were when you demanded to know the name of the killer.

You must have been one of the rare courageous men to have just asked that you personal rights for freedom be respected, that embezzlements by militias are not part of human rights.

Thank your “God” that you escaped alive with an intact passport and a current visa, or valuable document to your properties, of cherished photos and souvenirs of those who died to safeguard “freedom, honor, and self autonomy”.

You have to be thankful a thousand times that you survived to re-experience another civil war as a meek sheep.

(Fuck it all; there are no grounds to be happy or thankful to have survived a civil war, where no party even won the war! No victor!)

And all the militia/mafia “leaders” returned to rule Lebanon for 30 years after this war ended

In Context: Lebanon civil war didn’t end yet

Note: Re-edit of  2012 article “Civil war didn’t End yet? This time around…Part 2”

You have this desolate second largest city in north Lebanon: Tripoli means the Three Cities where three separate quarters were governed by the kings of Byblos (Jubeil), Saida (Sidon) and Tyr (sour) in antiquity.

Tripoli is currently ignored by the government, and has been for many decades.

The inhabitants of Tripoli are practically living in the Mamluk period, when the Near-East was ruled from Egypt, 7 centuries ago, and they wear the white “Arabic” jelabiyya, as if they were part of the “Arab” Gulf Emirates, or an extension of Saudi kingdom, without the these headgears (3igal), just carrying long beards and stuff…

You may read details on Tripoli and how it fared during the 17-year civil war, https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2008/10/22/testimonials-of-a-civil-war-in-lebanon-continue-6/

The adjacent province is the Akkar on the borders with Syria.

Akkar is another part of Lebanon totally ignored by the successive governments of this pseudo-State. Most of the soldiers and lower files and ranks are from Akkar, an agricultural area and lacking all kinds of facilities.

The US, Saudi kingdom, and Qatar are pouring in war money and weapons into the northern districts by Syria borders in order to support the armed Syrian insurgents against the Assad regime.  The weapons are shipped to the port of Tripoli and sent from Libya…

And the UN German ships controlling the arrival of ships loaded with weapons, a task assigned by the UN resolution to tighten the embargo on Gaza, has failed in its mission…The latest demonstration of force showed the emergence of heavy weapons in the streets of Tripoli…

The Lebanese  army is doing its best to counter this volatile situation and to control the influx of armed Syrian infiltrators into Lebanon and the exit of armed people from Lebanon into Syria.

Mind you the government has been queasy of extending a forceful and a resolute order to the army to do its jobs.

While fighting was raging in Tripoli, a couple hundred of social platforms connected people gathered in silence on Martyr Square in Downtown Beirut

It looks as a rerun of the conditions of 1968, which resulted in the civil war of 1975.

After Israel occupied all of the West Bank, Gaza, and Jerusalem in the preemptive war of 1967, thousands of Palestinians experienced another wave of refugees into Lebanon.

In 1968, Lebanon allowed the military wing of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) to set bases in the Arcoub region (south-east of Lebanon) and as a self-autonomous area where the Lebanese army would Not venture to enter and control.

In 1970, late King Hussein of Jordan crushed the PLO and the armed Palestinians flocked to the Arcoub Safe Zone, and gradually controlled most of South Lebanon.

A year later, the Capital Beirut became the main headquarter for all Palestinian factions. Lebanon was politically reduced to a de-facto Palestinian dictate.

In 1982, Israel invaded Lebanon and entered Beirut and forced the military wings of the PLO to vacate Lebanon.

And you have the same elements who sided with the armed Palestinians supporting the armed Syrian insurgents…

And you have the same kind of confused and perturbed weak government proclaiming that its policy is Not to intervene in troubled Syria or to strictly control the influx of armed Syrian insurgents…

Interchange armed Palestinian movements with Syrian armed insurgents, and north Lebanon will become another “Arcoub” of Safe Zone for launching military attacks on Syria instead of Israel…and another civil war will befall Lebanon…

Implicitly, what the youth are saying:
1. We don’t care what the radical Islamists wants to impose on us: We want them to stay clear from our safe zone neighborhoods in part of Lebanon…
2. We don’t care of the government motto of “staying clear from the troubles in the neighboring States, such as Syria..: All that we want is potable water, electricity, and not meddling in our life-style…
3. We don’t care what regime in Syria will replace the Assad clan…
4. We are so totally apolitical…We are frankly too ignorant in world affairs…we are the vegetarian kind, the doing good for the environment and climate, the youth not meddling in our own internal political affairs, we are the worldwide connected zombies…
And that is the problem: they don’t give a fuck and leave the fuckers decide for them…as if the war will never reach them…
They prefer to wait for the calamity to struck, but they won’t wake up…They are apolitical…and so is war?

Lebanon Civil War (1975-1990) not Ended yet? And conditions getting worse?

After the war ended without any military victory for any side, the militia/mafia “leaders” ruled the country, and are still behind the current “power”

Note 1: Repost of 2012 article “Civil war not Ended yet? This time around…No more Blemish. Part 3”
Note 2: This report does Not cover the current worsening situation in Lebanon. Total deficit in all branches: government budget, banks, Central Bank, No outside influx of fresh money, No productive economy… And this Coronavirus…
Note 3: You may read this link to comprehending the context of the problem: https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2012/05/26/part-2-civil-war-didnt-end-yet-this-time-around/

Two campaigns were carried out on social platforms to get the Lebanese engaged against the waves of internal instability that are reminiscent of the mechanisms of previous civil wars.

The first campaign, followed by marches in England, was under the banner “Silence means consent. Shout: NO TO CIVIL WAR, NO TO SECTARIANISM”.  The petition to sign said:

“We are Lebanese citizens who want a peaceful, stable and secular Lebanon. We are not connected to any political party or sectarian group”.

In light of the worrying recent events in Lebanon, we believe that time has come for the “silent majority” in Lebanon to speak up and shout: “NO TO CIVIL WAR, NO TO SECTARIANISM”.

Joanna Choukeir Hojeily was with Cedric Choukeir.

We call for:

• An “arm free” Lebanon

• A new law prohibiting the purchase or use of arms by civilians under any circumstances

• Civil peace to be guaranteed and reinforced by the government, the army and the security forces

• Unbiased and “non-sectarian” media coverage of the events as they unfold

• The prosecution of every individual who has directly or indirectly participated in the clashes and violent events of this past week in Lebanon

• Political leaders to seriously and actively stop arming their partisans and work towards containing the tension

• The civil society in Lebanon to take urgent action by lobbying, raising awareness, actively engaging in conflict prevention and starting peace initiatives targeting “at risk neighbourhoods

• Friends and family members of individuals involved in the violence to deter their loved ones from taking part in future clashes

Remember, silence means consent… so speak up!

The second campaign “Lebanon must have a War Free Zone…”
The two campaigns demonstrate the excellent intention of the majority of Lebanese to avoid another civil war and their serious engagement to confront the dark forces.
That is not enough:
The professional dark forces are receiving the strong signal that the peaceful and secular communities in Lebanon are not aware of the mechanisms for starting a civil war and how to effectively prevent a planned civil war.
The slogan asking for a War Free Zone for the secular Lebanese is hilarious: As if the UN job is to allocate a region within Lebanon for those Lebanese who want to stay clear from the consequences of a civil war, instead of immigrating to better pastures…
The professional dark forces are trained using a textbook on “How to Start and sustain a civil war”.
The key tactic in fomenting a civil war is to ease the youth into “shameful” activities, unaware of the gravity in participating in these activities, and cow the youth into silence, during the war, and years after the war has ended.
Many die, feeling pretty reluctant into divulging how they participated in the slaughter-hood and crimes against humanity.
My dad told me how at the beginning of the civil war in 1975, the local militia (the Kataeb, Phalanges) forced him and many other local middle-age men to carry old and non functional rifles, just to walk the streets at night in order to recognize “foreign elements” not from the village…
My dad and his team used to hide when a car or a truck, loaded with loot from the port of Beirut, showed up: They preferred not to recognize the people or to be recognized…
Many youth, frankly opposed to the local militia ideology, were hoarded into military training camps: The peer pressure was enough to sending these youth into participating actively in the civil war.  The blemish projected by family members and friends for getting military training  was another factor into keeping the silence…
As the youth is immersed into this madhouse of ugly activities of humiliating people, getting used to drugs, and the feeling of illusory power…things get out of hand.
After the war, many militia fighters got nostalgic: They were no longer “cared for” and the feeling that everything was available and handy had vanished, and they had to fend for their daily survival…
It is about time that the “anti-war” in Lebanon start doing their due diligence in amassing materials on how civil wars start, are carried out, and who are those dark professionals returning to Lebanon, and naming names, and quickly getting mobilized against the slightest sectarian and feudal innuendo…
Best of all, get communities to meet, face to face, and let this human connection shred the myths of the sectarian leaders and clerics they weaved against ”illusory enemies” to maintain their hold of the chattel…
 The US is sending the strong signal that it intends on pressuring Lebanon into policies that are against the Lebanese interest, otherwise, another round of civil disturbances is on the burners…
For example:
1. Maura Connelly, US ambassador to Lebanon, was seen having lunch in Zahleh with engineer Richard Jraissati, former “Lebanese Forces” foreign contacts during the civil war. Is the US blatantly sending the strong message that the planning for another round of civil war in Lebanon has reached the preparation stage?
2. The “Bagman” Jeffrey Feltman, former US ambassador to Lebanon and soon to be transferred to the UN as assistant to foreign affairs policies position , visits frequently Lebanon. The visits precede by a few days the “US warning its citizens not to travel to Lebanon”.
Feltman programs the destabilization of a country he was supposed to protect and insure its stability.
Feltman accompanies the visits of Zionist US Senators and Congressmen, like Joseph Lieberman who pay visits to North Lebanon in order to establish a Free Zone for the Syrian armed insurgents to start a civil war in Syria from a safe zone in Lebanon…
3. I am just finishing reading the column of Sarkis Naoum in the daily Al Nahar, who is conducting interviews with US politicians and policy makers.
Naoum wrote that the US is studying and analyzing every single piece of intelligence on Lebanese banking transactions with the Syrian regime, its business leaders, and with Iran and Hezbollah…If this is not a hot preparation to fomenting a civil war, what is it?
The worst part is that our Prime Minister Mikati divulged to the US representative a list of Syrian businessmen…Why? Mikati wanted to know if these businessmen (he is dealing with) are on a blacklist! The US is glad to investigate more names it didn’t have…
While the Lebanese are very worried of the resurgence of any civil war that never ended, Seth Sherwood posted on May 13 “The Urbanist’s Beirut: Contemporary art, notorious nightclubs, and Frenchified cafés…”

La Plage Beach Club on the Corniche Beirut.

(Photo: Paul Blackmore)

“While much of the Arab world has been blown apart by social upheaval, mass violence, and political turmoil, Beirut has been kicking back quietly on its Mediterranean perch, happy and astonished to be a spectator for once. (Even the New York Times recently hailed it a ­“haven amid turmoil.”)

By day, buzzing scooters and battered old Mercedes taxis honk their way along palm-lined boulevards, unimpeded by demonstrations.

By night, their occupants stroll on the seaside Corniche, smoke water pipes in cafés, and indulge in the Lebanese capital’s legendary nightlife. But of course all is not rosy.

Neighboring Syria remains a battleground. While there is a vibrant gay subculture, homosexual activity is technically illegal, and travelers with Israeli stamps in their passports can still be arrested and detained.

Tensions among rival ­politico-religious factions, some heavily armed, simmer under the surface.

But a relative calm in recent years has prompted a development boom.

Indeed, the razing of historical buildings to create luxury shopping malls has led some to decry the “Dubai-ification” of downtown Beirut. 

And a parallel blossoming in art, fashion, and gastronomy, propelling the famously bullet-riddled city to emerge as the Arab world’s creative center…”

For today, Lebanon needs urgently to prosecute the last phase of the unfinished civil war: Lebanon wants a Victor in order to establish a modern State.
 
For today, Lebanon needs urgently to prosecute the last phase of the unfinished civil war: After 65 years of a pseudo independence and pseudo State, and the impossibility of regular and gradual reforms for our political/social system, there will be a definite victor, this time around.
This time around the Lebanese want to securing a central State, engaged on the side of the people, the citizens.

And the Lebanese banks responded to the government attacks: All decisions were taken by the State institutions

رد مصرفي عنيـف علــى اتهامات الحكومـــة:*

طفح الكيل ولينتظروا منا ما يضع النقاط على الحروف!*

المركزية- تعتبر جهات مصرفية في مجالسها الخاصة، وفي اجتماعاتها المغلقة أن الكيل بدأ يطفح من حملات السياسيين الرسميين والحزبيين ومن الإعلام الدائر في فلكهم على خلفية تشويه صورة القطاع المصرفي واتهامه بإخفاء الأرقام والتلاعب بها،

في حين أن الحقيقة تكمن في أن الحكومة ووزارة المال هي التي تقوم بذلك بغطاء من مجلس النواب وتحاول الإفلات من محاسبة الناس والرأي العام باتهام القطاع المصرفي بشقيه مصرف لبنان والمصارف التجارية زوراً!

ويتساءل مرجع مصرفي عبر “المركزية”: “أيجوز للحكومة ومجلس النواب اللذين يضعان الموازنات ويقرانها بدون قطع حساب أن يوجها أصابع الاتهام الى المصارف التي تنشر موازناتها السنوية وتدفع على أساسها الضرائب للدولة اللبنانية، وتخضع لرقابة الجهات الرسمية كما للمساهمين والجمعيات العمومية؟

وهل يجوز لمن يخفي الأرقام الحقيقية للعجز في موازانات الدولة اللبنانية من خلال ألاعيب تأجيل الدفع وعدم إدراج الكثير من القروض التي حصلت عليها الدولة من الدول والصناديق ومستحقاتها في الموازنات أن يتهم القطاع المصرفي بعدم الشفافية والتلاعب بالأرقام وإخفائها”؟

ويتابع المرجع المصرفي: “ألا يخجل السياسيون من أسئلتهم المشبوهة حول حقيقة أرقام القطاع المصرفي وهم لغاية الآن لم يتمكنوا من حصر كلفة سلسلة الرتب والرواتب التي أقروها قبل سنتين بالتهور والشعبوية على سبيل رشوة الناخبين ومن إعطاء رقم صحيح وثابت لكلفة هذه السلسلة وما ترتبه على الدولة سنويا وانعكاساتها على المديين المتوسط والبعيد بالنسبة الى حجم الرواتب التقاعدية وتعويضات نهاية الخدمة، على رغم مرور أكثر من سنتين على أقرارهم سلسلة الرتب والرواتب”؟

وعن اتهام المصارف بالتواطوء مع مصرف لبنان لتأمين الديون المطلوبة للدولة على حساب المودعين بفوائد مرتفعة،

يسأل المرجع : “إذا كانت المصارف “متآمرة” مع المصرف المركزي لغايات تجارية وربحية كما يقولون، فما دخل المصارف بسندات الخزينة التي اشتراها الصندوق الوطني للضمان الاجتماعي لتمويل عجز الخزينة،

وهل أن القيمين على الصندوق ومرجعياتهم السياسية مستثنون في هذه الحالة من التهمة التي يوجهونها زورا الى المصارف؟

وهل المصارف اكتتبت في سندات الخزينة سرا وتهريبا أم بناء على قوانين أصدرها مجلس النواب بناء على طلب الحكومة.

وهل المصارف والمودعون هم الوحيدون الذين استفادوا من الفوائد المرتفعة؟

ألم تستفد الدولة من الضرائب على الفوائد؟

وكم تبلغ قيمة الأموال التي جبتها الدولة من هذه الضرائب علماً أن الضريبة التي جبتها الدولة اللبنانية من أرباح المصارف من الهندسات المالية بلغت لوحدها 800 مليون دولار”؟

ويمضي المرجع في تفنيد الحملة على المصارف بالقول: “يتهمنا بعض السياسيين والحزبيين زورا بتبديد أموال المودعين، علما أن هذه الأموال معروفة وجهة التوظيف والاستثمار في القطاعين العام والخاص بكل دقة،

ولكن هل بإمكانهم أن يشرحوا لنا وللبنانيين أين وظفوا هم وكيف صرفوا أموال سندات الخزينة وأموال الضرائب والرسوم والعائدات التي جبوها بالمليارات من الشعب اللبناني؟

وأذا سلمنا جدلا بأن اتهاماتهم صحيحة للمصارف ومصرف لبنان بتبديد اموال المودعين من خلال توظيفها في سندات الخزينة، فإن السؤال البديهي هو أين بددت الدولة أموال المودعين والمصارف الذين استثمروا في سندات الخزينة، فسندات الخزينة موجودة بيد من اشتراها

لكن أين هي الأموال التي أخذتها الدولة؟ وهل تُسأل المصارف في هذه الحالة عن تبديد الإيداعات أم الدولة؟”

ويضيف المرجع المصرفي: “يطالبون المصارف بأن تأتي بأموال أصحابها، وبأموال المستثمرين اللبنانيين والعرب والأجانب فيها من الخارج لتأمين السيولة بحجة الحفاظ على أموال المودعين وحقوقهم، وهي محفوظة ومضمونة بالنسبة الى المصارف،

ولكن هل يمكن لأحد من المسؤولين السياسيين في الدولة أن يجيبنا من أين سيأتون هم بالأموال لسداد تعويضات نهاية الخدمة وحقوق المستشفيات والمتعهدين والمضمونين في الصناديق الضامنة للدولة اللبنانية”؟

ويتابع: “إضطرت المصارف تحت ضغط حالة عدم الاستقرار السياسي والأمني والإقتصادي الذي تتحمل مسؤوليته الحكومة أن تتخذ إجراءات موقتة لتنظيم سحب الأموال النقدية،

لكنها لم تتوقف يوما عن تلبية ما يمكن تلبيته من حاجات المودعين وتأمين حقوقهم ولو بالحد الأدنى الممكن والمتاح، فهل يحق للحكومة والسياسيين الذين يعملون على اتخاذ قرار بالتخلف كليا عن الدفع للدائنين الداخليين والخارجيين أن يأخذوا على المصارف التقنين في مواجهة الهجمة على السحوبات وتخفيض قيمة الأموال النقدية المسحوبة”؟

ويسأل: “بأي منطق تريد الحكومة التخلف عن دفع سندات الخزينة عنوة وقبل التفاوض وتنظيم الجدولة مع الدائنين، علما أن 80 بالمئة من دين الدولة اللبنانية هو دين داخلي، وهي في الوقت ذاته تتهم المصارف بحجب الأموال عن المودعين؟

من أين تأتي المصارف بكامل الأموال الموظفة في سندات الخزينة إذا تخلفت الدولة عن الدفع؟

وماذا عن سندات الخزينة التي اشتراها اللبنانيون مباشرة من الدولة؟

ألا تحاسب الدولة على عدم تسديدها؟ وألا يعتبر ذلك سرقة لأموال الناس مشابهة لسرقة أموال المصارف؟ ومنذ متى، وبأي منطق أو قانون تحاسب ضحية المتخلف عن الدفع ويُبرأ المتخلف”؟

ويخلص المرجع المصرفي الى التأكيد بأن المفلس هو الدولة اللبنانية وليست المصارف ولا الشعب اللبناني!

وبالتالي فالمفلس المبذر الذي تصرّف بأموال المصارف والناس هو من يجب أن يكون في قفص الاتهام والمحاسبة والمحاكمة وليس ضحاياه.

ومع ذلك فالمصارف مستعدة لتحمل كامل مسؤولياتها، ولكن هل تتحمل الحكومة والسياسيون مسؤولياتهم الأخلاقية والأدبية والمعنوية قبل القانونية؟

ويختم:”طفح الكيل أو يكاد من الكذب والتزوير والتجني والافتراء! ومن الآن وصاعداً لن نسكت على هذه الحملات… ولينتظروا منا ما يعجبهم وما يضع النقاط على الحروف”!

Note: Political system of civil war militia/mafia “leaders, Central Bank, banking system, and parliament controlled by the chief of all mafias  coalition Nabih Berry, and the Hariri clan controlled Lebanon since 1992.

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

February 2021
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728

Blog Stats

  • 1,462,019 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 802 other followers

%d bloggers like this: