Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Coaching

Managing is more than processes and procedures; it’s people.

Successful managers bring out the best in others.: Management and leadership are about coaching around performance.” John Baldoni

By Dan Rockwell?

My conversation with author, speaker, and executive coach, John Baldoni, covered everything from what’s wrong with leadership to the good side of office politics. John has an amazing breadth of experience and expertise.

Manager as coach:

Coaching rises to the top of leadership skills in organizations that value participation rather than command and control.

Coaching is about long-term relationships.” John Baldoni

John suggests manager-coaches begin with three questions:

  1. What does my employee want? Uncover motivation. Do they want development, promotion, opportunity? All employees strive for recognition.
  2. What is stopping my employee from achieving her objectives? Everyone has blind spots and behaviors that hold them back.
  3. What can I do to help my employee become more successful? Sometimes you’ll challenge. Other times, you’ll be a cheerleader.

Coaching Tips for managers:

  1. Coaches don’t do the work for others.
  2. Schedule regular sessions.
  3. Stay performance focused.
  4. Deal with one challenge at a time.
  5. Keep the tone positive and conversational.
  6. Assess the process. How are you doing as a coach? How is the person doing?
  7. Demonstrate belief in employees.
  8. Evaluate.

 “Leaders who coach are those who treat their employees as individuals and regard them as contributors” John Baldoni

What makes managers successful coaches?

 What is challenging about coaching?

This post is a combination of my conversation with John and his new book, The Leader’s Pocket Guide.s

Circumstances don’t determine the atmosphere and tone of organizations, leaders do.

Look around your office or leadership team. Is the tone positive or negative? Now, look at yourself. How are you perceived?

Organizations reflect leadership.

Thursday, I reconnected with Shirzad Chamine, author of, Positive Intelligence. He reminded me that our “Sage” is a joyful, curious, explorer. I started thinking about fearful versus confident leadership.

Fearful vs. Confident:

Fearful leaders withdraw, limit, control, manipulate, and pressure others. Fearful leaders respond to challenges, opportunities, and problems pessimistically.

Confidence fuels optimism; fear fuels pessimism.

Tough circumstances test everyone, especially leaders. Hand-wringers set negative tones. On the other hand, denying tough times never inspires.

Optimism:

Leadership-optimism isn’t pretending everything’s okay. Confident leaders connect, inspire, and unleash. They explore with curiosity.

Inspirational leaders face tough times
with curiosity, exploration, joy, and confidence.

Realistic:

Leadership-attitude won’t solve tough times. It is, however, the way leaders establish tone and atmosphere in collaborative environments during challenging situations. Positive environments are built on positive attitudes, speech, and behaviors.

(Check out Soren Kaplan’s book, Leapfrogging, for more on optimism.)

What’s the difference between foolish and realistic optimism?

How can leaders set positive tones in organizations?

Essential questions to a satisfactory living

During conversations with my coach, Bob Hancox, he asks, “Would you like to be coached?” When I say yes, I know I’ll hear a series of skillful questions.

Rene Petrin says, “Mentoring is a transformational relationship. Build the relationship – the outcomes will follow. Building relationships is about trust.” Petrin adds, “Skilled mentors ask great questions.

By Dan Rockwell?

Coaching vs. mentoring:

  1. What do you understand about this situation?
  2. What have you done?
  3. What has worked?
  4. What hasn’t worked?
  5. What forces are at work?
  6. What are the potential consequences?
  7. Who does this impact?
  8. What are the obstacles?

Distinctions between coaching and mentoring help us discuss individual features and techniques but they overlap.

Questions – essential to success:

Regardless of definitions, coaches and mentors ask great questions.

Great questions such as:

  1. Open windows.
  2. Challenge assumptions.
  3. Destabilize.
  4. Move toward clarity.
  5. Aren’t agenda driven.

Three types of mentoring questions:

Petrin suggests mentors First to explore. Second, ask questions that seek solutions. Third, ask process questions that evaluate mentor-mentee dynamics and explore what’s been learned (Is that a kind of infusing an experimental mind process of thinking?)

Powerful Questions:

Petrin suggests mentors ask things like:

  1. What do you understand about this situation?
  2. What have you done?
  3. What has worked?
  4. What hasn’t worked?
  5. What forces are at work?
  6. What are the potential consequences?
  7. Who does this impact?
  8. What are the obstacles?

I’ve found either/or thinkers come up with two options.

I like repeating their options and asking, “What’s the third option?

Resources:

Rene Petrin’s resources.

Bob Hancox co-authored, “Coaching for Engagement.” It’s filled with great questions.

Facebook contributors provided their suggestions for great questions on 8/2/2012.

What questions aid the coaching/mentoring process?

What are the  components of great questions?

The Seven Powers of Powerful Questions

Questions are the most powerful statements you make.

  1. Questions expose. Your questions tell me who you are.
  2. Questions invite thought. Answers end thought.
  3. Questions enlighten.“It is not the answer that enlightens, but the question,” Decouvertes.
  4. Questions overcome resistance. People naturally question statements. On the other hand, ask an honest question and people lean in.
  5. Questions enable ownership. When I tell you the answer, I own it. If you arrive at the answer, you own it.
  6. Questions reveal what matters. Ask about what you care about.
  7. Questions establish focus.

More on focus:

When I started riding motorcycles, I learned they drifted in the direction I looked. A dangerous thing if you like to look around.

Focus establishes direction.

What you persistently ask about gets done.

Illustration:

An organization that believes in relationship before opportunity could ask their employees for the names of the people they met that day.

Questions express values.

 

Big question:

During a recent conversation with Scott Cochrane, Executive Director of the Leadership Center Willow Creek Canada, I heard a question that sent chills up my spine.

Scott went to a meeting and asked this compelling, outward facing question, “What do you need to see for our country to change?” I feel purpose behind his words.

Good but not great questions:

  1. Declining companies asking, “How can we stop our decline?”
  2. Failing leaders asking, “How can we better lead?
  3. Inefficient organizations asking, “How can we increase efficiencies?”
  4. Financially strapped businesses asking, “How can we make more money?”

If you or your organization is falling short, you may be asking questions that fall short. Ask questions with purpose.

Try asking the most valuable of all questions: “How can we best bring value to those we serve?” for example.

You won’t get the right answer until you ask the right question.

Follow Scott Cochrane on twitter: @WScottCochrane

What are the great questions leaders ask?


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

April 2020
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