Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘daily habits

How can photos change the world? Is that why our daily habits keep changing?

In my industry, we believe that images can change the world.

Okay, we’re naive, we’re bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. The truth is that we know that the images themselves don’t change the world, but we’re also aware that, since the beginning of photography, images have provoked reactions in people, and those reactions have caused change to happen.

0:32 So let’s begin with a group of images. I’d be extremely surprised if you didn’t recognize many or most of them. They’re best described as iconic: so iconic, perhaps, they’re cliches. In fact, they’re so well-known that you might even recognize them in a slightly or somewhat different form.

 

0:56 But I think we’re looking for something more. We’re looking for something more. We’re looking for images that shine an uncompromising light on crucial issues, images that transcend borders, that transcend religions, images that provoke us to step up and do something — in other words, to act.

Well, this image you’ve all seen. It changed our view of the physical world. We had never seen our planet from this perspective before. Many people credit a lot of the birth of the environmental movement to our seeing the planet like this for the first time — its smallness, its fragility.

1:33 Forty years later, this group, more than most, are well aware of the destructive power that our species can wield over our environment.

And at last, we appear to be doing something about it. This destructive power takes many different forms. For example, these images taken by Brent Stirton in the Congo. These gorillas were murdered, some would even say crucified, and unsurprisingly, they sparked international outrage. Most recently, we’ve been tragically reminded of the destructive power of nature itself with the recent earthquake in Haiti. (And Nepal and…)

2:08 Well, I think what is far worse is man’s destructive power over man. Samuel Pisar, an Auschwitz survivor, said, and I’ll quote him, “The many genocides in this century teaches us that nature, even in its cruelest moments, is benign in comparison with man, when he loses his moral compass and his reason.”

2:29 There’s another kind of crucifixion. The horrifying images from Abu Ghraib as well as the images from Guantanamo had a profound impact. The publication of those images, as opposed to the images themselves, caused a government to change its policies.

Some would argue that it is those images that did more to fuel the insurgency in Iraq than virtually any other single act. Furthermore, those images forever removed the so-called moral high ground of the occupying forces.

2:58 Let’s go back a little. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Vietnam War was basically shown in America’s living rooms day in, day out. News photos brought people face to face with the victims of the war: a little girl burned by napalm, a student killed by the National Guard at Kent State University in Ohio during a protest. In fact, these images became the voices of protest themselves.

3:22 Now, images have power to shed light of understanding on suspicion, ignorance, and in particular — I’ve given a lot of talks on this but I’ll just show one image — the issue of HIV/AIDS.

In the 1980s, the stigmatization of people with the disease was an enormous barrier to even discussing or addressing it. A simple act, in 1987, of the most famous woman in the world, the Princess of Wales, touching an HIV/AIDS infected baby did a great deal, especially in Europe, to stop that. She, better than most, knew the power of an image.

3:57 So when we are confronted by a powerful image, we all have a choice: We can look away, or we can address the image. Thankfully, when these photos appeared in The Guardian in 1998, they put a lot of focus and attention and, in the end, a lot of money towards the Sudan famine relief efforts.

Did the images change the world? No, but they had a major impact. Images often push us to question our core beliefs and our responsibilities to each other. We all saw those images after Katrina, and I think for millions of people they had a very strong impact. And I think it’s very unlikely that they were far from the minds of Americans when they went to vote in November 2008.

4:37 Unfortunately, some very important images are deemed too graphic or disturbing for us to see them. I’ll show you one photo here, and it’s a photo by Eugene Richards of an Iraq War veteran from an extraordinary piece of work, which has never been published, called War Is Personal.

But images don’t need to be graphic in order to remind us of the tragedy of war. John Moore set up this photo at Arlington Cemetery. After all the tense moments of conflict in all the conflict zones of the world, there’s one photograph from a much quieter place that haunts me still, much more than the others.

5:13 Ansel Adams said, and I’m going to disagree with him, “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” In my view, it’s not the photographer who makes the photo, it’s you. We bring to each image our own values, our own belief systems, and as a result of that, the image resonates with us.

My company has 70 million images. I have one image in my office. Here it is. I hope that the next time you see an image that sparks something in you, you’ll better understand why, and I know that speaking to this audience, you’ll definitely do something about it.

Patsy Z and TEDxSKE shared a link.
Photographs do more than document history — they make it.
At TED University, Jonathan Klein of Getty Images shows some of the most iconic, and talks about what happens when a generation sees an image so powerful it can’t look away –…
ted.com|By Jonathan Klein

Comfort Zone: Nemesis to mankind’s peace of mind…

Comfort Zone is what people are ready to commit anything to retain it, a while longer…

People kill people

People hurt people, humiliate people, antagonize people… to hang on to their comfort zone, a while longer…

And people have experienced many times that comfort zone never lasts: Economic conditions change, you get fired, transferred, calamities hit your comfort zone, destroy your cozy home, disturb your daily habits...

Comfort zone is synonymous with refusing to change daily habits, seasonal habits…

People oppose nomadic life-style to settled people in comfortable zones. Wrong!

A nomad also has his comfort zones, and live according to a set of daily habits, eating certain food…

Imagine a nomadic tribe moving to the well-worn summer location and discovering this sign “Do not trespass“.

Maybe the State has decided that the summer location for the tribe is better used for target range shooting, digging oil wells, a power plant or establishing a new urban center…

Do you think that the first reaction of the nomad is “Oh well, I’ll move to the adjacent district… the grass is greener and it is more isolated for my women and kids…”

No!. The nomad will reclaim is entitled right that years of habits and customs made it unreasonable to change his summer location…

This particular summer location is his comfort zone that his pre-programmed brain expected

It is this pre-programmed brain on daily habits that physically ache and turn someone into an angry person, ready to “snatch” his right, any which way he can…

People oppose comfort zone with homelessness. Wrong!

Even a homeless person has his comfort zone, his daily habits, his corner in a street, his “clients”, the places he goes to piss, wash his face, restaurant he patronizes…

Do you think when the policeman chases a homeless out from his location, the reaction will be “Oh well. No sweat. I’ll just move to the adjacent street…”

This homeless, depending on how long has remained in this particular location, will commit a lot of mischief and demonstrate plenty of determination and stubbornness to retain and return to his “favorite” comfort zone.

In the mind of many, comfort zone is associated with a cozy home, contented family surrounding... That’s not necessarily the case.

Many people consider home a place to run away from: Their comfort zone is out of home.

Actually, many mid-age people find the shed the ideal location for peace of mind.

Many persons are constantly traveling: Their comfort zones are particular franchise hotels, restaurants, selected airlines

You have a person who got finally bored of his urban setting and feels that he has to make a change and move on. If he goes to the suburb, his brain initial reaction is to find similar facilities that the mental system was used to. The person will be driving around selecting the right supermarket, the covered swimming pool, the running track… all the facilities that matched his previous comfort zone.

The person might decide to move to a more natural setting, like in a forest, on the assumption of living like a natural savage. Do you think that he starts cutting his own fire wood, gathering what the land produces…? Most probably, the person will get behind the wheel and drive for miles in search of facilities his mental model ached to find what matched the previous comfort zone.

People will not return and settle in “nature” voluntarily.

If many people are forced to be transferred to an isolated land, you see shacks sprouting as shops in order to satisfy the habits of urban facilities.

Comfort zone precedes mankind urbanization.

Comfort zone is a mechanism that the brain seeks in order to facilitate the navigation of mankind in a new environment, to getting used to a new setting, and allowing the unconscious to decide after the daily habits are nailed down.

Disturbing comfort zone is the root of mankind aggressive behavior.

We don’t consciously seek a comfort zone: this tendency comes naturally, a pre-programmed behavior that the brain requires in order to function smoothly and automatically. Our system wants to rearrange a zone to match what it was used to evolve within.

Training and practice to shed this comfort zone behavior is not feasible.

As your senses get used to an environment and you move around without consciously noticing location and the crowd… that means you have already settled in a comfort zone. Basically, a couple of days is generally good enough to get in automatic motion around the new environment…

The best remedy is to begin enjoying doing the daily maintenance tasks in your home: sweeping, mopping, doing dishes, cooking...

As you move to a new location, get on the daily house chores since your system was trained to perform on a daily basis. This habit might fool the brain for a period, until it gets used to the new environment…

Colonial powers systematically disturbed the comfort zone of the indigenous people around the world.

In the name of their people, the colonial powers abused the indigenous people so that the elite classes amass more wealth and accumulate more power.

In the name of their people who didn’t ask for that kinds of higher standards of living… millions of indigenous people were humiliated and enslaved for centuries


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

December 2020
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