Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Downtown Beirut

 

Blocking Downtown Beirut From The People

This Is The True #AbouRakhousa objective

This Is Unacceptable

The Lebanese Government has no idea what it’s doing. If you thought it had an inkling before, be certain now that it’s essentially an establishment that only functions on reflexes

Their latest reflex is blocking Downtown Beirut at its main entrance near Le Grey in order to prevent entry to protests to those streets to which not only should they be allowed access, but to which they have a fundamental right.

September 22, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, our government build a big concrete wall near Riyad el Solh square to block protests from having a 1% access – even less – to the Grand Serail.

The Beirut Wall lasted 24 hours at the time before it was brought down.

Every single minister declared that the wall in question was not their doing. Yeah, right. One thing became clear, however, that wall – as irrelevant a barricade as it was – signaled the massive divide between governance and people.

Any political system that wants to self-sustain should not be afraid of its people.

It should be from the people, to the people. Our government is squarely against us.

They beat us, they humiliate us, they rob us of our fundamental rights and still have the audacity to play victim.

That concrete wall was then replaced by massive barbed wires, which are now adorned will all kinds of slogans berating those hiding themselves behind such barricades, cowering away from the people demanding they be held accountable. But even that slide.

On Sunday, the #YouStink movement held a march with several thousand people all the way to Downtown Beirut, at the gates of Nejmeh Square.

The march was to demand access to parliament, to demand fair elections to try and replace the current governing body we have (or so I think).

The protestors were met with riot police adamant about not letting them pass.

(The militia leader Nabih Berry is chairman of the Parliament for 30 years and claims that he is safeguarding his dignity)

The entrance to Nejmeh Square was barricaded, of course, and it still is until this day.

Our government, however, decided to take this a step further yesterday night and block the entirety of Downtown Beirut from all kinds of people, protestors or not, by erecting concrete blocks at its main entrance, near Annahar – Michelle Tueini should be happy – and Le Grey – Nicolas Chammas would be happy too.

Check out the pictures via Abir Ghattas:

A few days ago, Nicolas Chammas – the head of Beirut’s commerce syndicate – was “worried” that the protests taking place in Downtown Beirut now at the hand of protestors he called were “communists,” because clearly only leftists and communists would have an issue with the current establishment, were turning his beloved Downtown area into a cheap market which he dubbed “Abou Rakhoussa.” (Cheap people for poor people)

Little does Mr. Chammas know  that in its current form Downtown Beirut is not only “abou rakhoussa,” it’s cheaper than cheap. As the Lebanese popular saying goes: “bteswa franc b iyyem l ghala”  (worth less than a dollar in utter expensive period. Designed to attract wealthy Gulf Emirs)

And no amount of Hermes, Chanel, Aïshti shops and fancy hotels or restaurants can change that.

They wonder why Downtown Beirut is not popular with the Lebanese populace.

Maybe it has something to do with the fact that the average Lebanese income is nowhere near the one needed for minimum purchase power there?

Or that the area was built by raping the property of common Lebanese folk who were not able to challenge the system back then to give them their right?

Maybe it has something to do with the fact that there’s a security zone every other meter there, or that there’s someone in it that feels threatened every single waking moment of their life so they feel the necessity to draw endless perimeters around their holy being to stay safe from people who just want to have a good time?

Maybe it has something to do with the fact that the entire area is not meant for us but for tourists who are not even coming here anymore because they have much nicer places to go to elsewhere?

Maybe it has something to do with the fact that cheapness is not a measure of how cheap the area is, but how lifeless, dead, horrifying, without charm and character an area actually is?

Downtown Beirut fits those to the letter.

That new barricade they built at its main entrance to keep us out is a disgrace.

They want Downtown Beirut to remain their area, the place where they feel exclusive, the place where they can sit and chastise the average Lebanese about not being “western” enough to care about fancy facades and empty cores, the place where they can make sure the average Lebanese they fear always feels excluded, not-belonging, ostracized and shut out.

Nejmeh square is not a property of our politicians. The Grand Serail area is not a property of our politicians. None of the streets in Downtown are their property, but they sure act like it all the time. Beirut is not their city alone; it’s also ours. They’ve robbed it and claimed it enough.

I’d like to see them running tourist-attracting ads now. Come to Beirut, see our state of the art walls and empty streets. We promise you’ll love it; no Lebanese are allowed here.

There’s nothing more disgraceful and despicable than a government that thinks it’s more important than its own people.  You see that barricade they’re building to keep us – the people – out of their exclusive area? It’s not keeping us out, it’s locking them in.

This is the real Abou Rakhousa: an area worth billions, but is being rendered uninhabitable, foreign with total shutting out of anything and everything Lebanese.

The area’s worth is not its buildings and empty streets, but the people. Without us, your billion dollar projects are worth nothing.

This is apartheid, Lebanon-style.

Urgent. Someone pass the lexotanil pills to Nicolas Chammas.

Part 2. Civil war didn’t End yet? This time around…

You have this desolate second largest city in north Lebanon: Tripoli means the Three Cities where three separate quarters were governed by the kings of Byblos (Jubeil), Saida (Sidon) and Tyr (sour) in antiquity. Tripoli is currently ignored by the government, and has been for many decades.

The inhabitants of Tripoli are practically living in the Mamluk period, when the Near-East was ruled from Egypt, 7 centuries ago, and they wear the white “Arabic” jelabiyya, as if they were part of the “Arab” Gulf Emirates, or an extension of Saudi Arabia, without the these head gears igal, just carrying long beards and stuff…

You may read details on Tripoli and how it fared during the 17-year civil war, https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2008/10/22/testimonials-of-a-civil-war-in-lebanon-continue-6/

The adjacent district is the Akkar on the borders with Syria. Akkar is another part of Lebanon totally ignored by the successive governments of this pseudo-State. Most of the soldiers and lower files and ranks are from Akkar, an agricultural area and lacking all kinds of facilities.

The US, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar are pouring in war money and weapons into the northern districts by Syria borders in order to support the armed Syrian insurgents against the Assad regime.  The weapons are shipped to the port of Tripoli and sent from Libya…

And the UN German ships controlling the arrival of ships loaded with weapons, a task assigned by the UN resolution to tighten the embargo on Gaza, has failed in its mission…The latest demonstration of force showed the emergence of heavy weapons in the streets of Tripoli…

The Lebanese  army is doing its best to counter this volatile situation and to control the influx of armed Syrian infiltrators into Lebanon and the exit of armed people from Lebanon into Syria.

Mind you the government has been queasy of extending a forceful and a resolute order to the army to do its jobs.

While fighting was raging in Tripoli, a couple hundred of social platforms connected people gathered in silence on Martyr Square in Downtown Beirut

It looks as a rerun of the conditions of 1968, which resulted in the civil war of 1975.

After Israel occupied all of the West bank, Gaza, and Jerusalem in the preemptive war of 1967, thousands of Palestinians experienced another wave of refugees into Lebanon. In 1968, Lebanon allowed the military wing of the Palestinian Liberation Organization to set bases in the Arcoub region (south-east of Lebanon) and as a self-autonomous area where the Lebanese army would not venture to enter and control.

In 1970, late King Hussein of Jordan crushed the PLO and the armed Palestinians flocked to the Arcoub Safe Zone, and gradually controlled most of South Lebanon.  A year later, the Capital Beirut became the main headquarter for all Palestinian factions. Lebanon was reduced politically to a de-facto Palestinian dictate.

In 1982, Israel invaded Lebanon and entered Beirut and forced the military wings of the PLO to vacate Lebanon.

And you have the same elements who supported the armed Palestinians supporting the armed Syrian insurgents…

And you have the same kind of confused and perturbed weak government proclaiming that its policy is Not to intervene in troubled Syria or to strictly control the influx of armed Syrian insurgents…

Interchange armed Palestinian movements with Syrian armed insurgents, and north Lebanon will become another “Arcoub” of Safe Zone for launching military attacks on Syria instead of Israel…and another civil war will befall Lebanon…

You read on social platforms this slogan:

Implicitly, what the youth are saying:
1. We don’t care what the radical Islamists wants to impose on us: We want them to stay clear from our safe zone neighborhoods in part of Lebanon…
2. We don’t care of the government motto of “staying clear from the troubles in the neighboring States, such as Syria..): All that we want is potable water, electricity, and not meddling in our life-style…
3. We don’t care what regime in Syria will replace the Assad clan…
4. We are so totally apolitical…We are frankly too ignorant in world affairs…we are the vegetarian kind, the doing good for the environment and climate, the youth not meddling in our own internal political affairs, we are the worldwide connected zombies…
And that is the problem: they don’t give a fuck and leave the fuckers decide for them…as if the war will never reach them…
They prefer to wait for the calamity to struck, but they won’t wake up…They are apolitical…and so is war?

Get ready for Thursday Feb. 3 afternoon: Downtown Beirut.  There is a sit in mass popular demonstration until a government is formed. Bring in the tents, sleeping bags, and backpack.  Bring in all your family members:  We will party as a united people: We want a government now!

Lebanon is not Iraq:  We have no foreign troops on our lands.  We don’t have to wait months for every new designated Prime Minister to constitute a government.   Last time, the ex-PM Saad Hariri who was fired two weeks ago lingered 6 months before presenting a government that produced not a single promise.

Maybe the Lebanese are used to function without a government, but this should no longer be the norm.

We have no Israeli, Syrian, US troops, or “multinational coalition forces” to impose peace and security on our land.  The Lebanese Resistance kicked out Israel from the south in 2000  and defeated Israel preemptive incursion in 2006.  The Syrian troops and intelligence services had vacated the land in 2005.  We have no reason to bow and accept this recurring humiliating scenarios of waiting for months for the formation of a government.

We have 19 “recognized religious sects”.  So what!  We have great people in every sect to represent all Lebanese and work consciously for the interest of a democratic and independent Lebanon. Let Mikati PM select 19 hard-working, professional, honest ministers from the various sects.  We don’t need superfluous “Super Ministers” with no ministry to run or jobs to do!  We want a government now.

We don’t want to be waiting for the International Court for Lebanon to present its preliminary indictments in order to form a responsible government.  What is the job of a government except preempting coming calamities? We resent that Lebanon has been under UN mandated power for the last 5 years; we refuse to keep waiting for every events and trouble in the region to be solved before we get on with business.

The Egyptians and Tunisians revolted and got organized without the help and guidance of any political party.  We, the Lebanese, don’t need to be waiting for every feudal and sectarian “leader” to give us any damned green light to get on the march and moving toward serious reforms.  We want a bold and functional government now.

Come down to Downtown Beirut and be counted. Bring in the tents, sleeping bags, and backpack.  Bring in all your family members:  We will party as a united people: We want a government now! We will not leave until a government is formed.  Our lame leaders are not as stupid and mule-minded as Mubarak of Egypt is.  We, the Lebanese, have demonstrated that we can be as determined and united as the great people of Egypt.

Guys, we have a large window of opportunity to send a firm message: “This vicious cycles of spending months catering to every whim of every feudal, sectarian, and cartel party leader is no longer appetizing to our palate.  We are hungry, frustrated, and angrier than a wasp.  Lebanon political structure is to be reformed, and this is as good a time as ever.”

Bring in the tents, sleeping bags, and backpack.  Bring in all your family members:  We will party as a united people: We want a government now!

A State “out of subject matters” (Lebanon), by Dr. Jamil Berry, (November 9, 2008)

I am reading in French “Le Liban, pays hors sujets?” by Dr. Jamil Berry.

This manuscript is 164 pages, funny, tragic, and within the subject matter.  It is a partial autobiography covering 4 years of a Lebanese surgeon who decided to return from France and practice surgery in 1992, just after Lebanon was getting out of 17 years of civil war.

Dr. Berry, of the Moslem Shiaa sect and from south Lebanon of the town of Tebnine, was absent of Lebanon for 22 years and he arrived in 1992 to share in rebuilding of the medical institutions and surgical staff.  He was first confronted with a pseudo Lebanon of what he had in mind.

It is a story of a State where the higher the mark of luxury of the car and the more sumptuous the palaces, the higher the indication of a personality within the State’s affluence. In the same time, this affluence is inversely proportional in the scale of redundancy.

Jamil Berry was 17 year-old when he landed in Bordeaux, France, to join a medical university. Berry’s French is highly classical but he was extremely unfamiliar with the slang of this nation.  He was under the impression that “bagniol” (car) might imply a girl friend. His French friend invited him to a ride in his bagniol which he used to lend to his father, and clients of his father and which bounces nicely. Jamil first refused the ride with “bagniol”; when Jamil’s friend came for breakfast before going out for the ride Jamil asked him “Why your bagniol is not joining us? Do call up your bagniol”. 

The Classical French language is fraught with polysemism (a word might have several meanings) but the slang is much worse because the root of the word has no relationship with the meaning of the other dozen meanings. For example, “pepins” (seeds) might mean seed, umbrella, minor troubles, redundant objects, and others.

The main characteristic of Downtown Beirut was dust, dust and more dust and heavy-duty vehicles removing debris and crashing down crumbling building.  The Lebanese “citizen” was in a period of classifying in his memory the events, images and horrors that he went through and thus was in a haggard state, confused and mighty serene with his unfocused eyes; a young man bumped the rear of a parked car and the profusion of his excuses meant that he was actually looking intently in front of him but still he didn’t see the car!

Dr. Berry received clients in clinics on West and East Beirut but he charged higher fees his Christian patients because they could afford it.

In a month time, he saved $100 and invited his French wife to a restaurant; it turned out that the $100 bill was faked! Once, Dr. Berry applied to the hospital “Hotel Dieu”, fundamentally a French hospital and run by Christian administrators and physicians; his application was denied: the highly professionals are still endemic sectarians and regional.

A year later, Dr. Berry joined a French delegation for the program of twining 4 public hospitals with corresponding hospitals in France for gaining training and experience in running hospitals.

The staff at “Hotel Dieu” was beside itself for having to answer to Dr. Berry in order to receive financial aid.

Many public hospitals applied for the twining program and were denied: the applications were rhetorical and lacked graphs, charts and scientific compactness in contents and presentation.

Every Friday, Jamil practiced a day in his hometown Tebnine at its public hospital that was directed by a Colonel in the Army.  The Colonel was complaining that young people, no more than 35 years old, were dying suddenly. It happened that Israel was bombarded this area for 45 minutes and sucked up all the energy in Dr. Berry.

Jamil told the Colonel that these deaths can be explained and it is related to economy: the people in south Lebanon never have the time to recuperate their energies and one day the high energy deficit reclaims sudden death.

In the summer of 1993, Israel launched a 5-day preemptive war on Lebanon from air and sea and south Lebanon was under heavy fire.  Dr. Berry volunteered to join Tebnine’s hospital.  The Minister of Health took him aside and said “Reflect well. This is a real war. Your patients would not be victims of car accidents”.

The horror was reaching Tebnine in Red Cross ambulances.  At one junction, an Israeli Apache helicopter hovered in a stand still position for 7 minutes in front of their ambulance; each minute was an eternity because Israel shoots on purpose ambulances and then claim “collateral damage” incidents.

Going toward Tyre to unload medicines and board another ambulance, the 28 year-old nurse Carla was sitting beside Jamil: her job during the trip was to shield Dr. Berry with her body from any Israeli rocket. In Tebnine, the veiled nurses kissed and hugged Dr. Berry: customs are out in frightening moments.

The Minister of Health decided to visit two public hospitals in the south after the war.  He brought rhetoric instead of dire needed cash and medicines and equipments! This State is outside the subject matters and their officials and counselors out of subjects.

Then came the full-scale preemptive war of April 12, 1996 when Israel bombarded Lebanon for 15 days and destroyed for nth time all Lebanon’s infrastructures or what was left of them; it culminated in the slaughter in the town of Qana where citizens were taking refuge in a UN compound, 107 died instantly and hundreds would die in later days from injuries. Dr. Berry was in the hospital of Tebnine that accommodated over one thousand refugees; he also witnesses an Israeli F16 rocket 4 times a poor potable water reservoir that served 200, 000 inhabitants of the region!

Dr. Berry expounded on how the 150 private hospitals are blackmailing the government and siphoning $400 millions from the treasury just for reserving “beds” for surgery cases that the public hospitals are equipped to perform and how the powerful lobby of the owners of private hospitals are pressuring the governments from investing in public sanitary institutions and also preventing any accounting, inspections or control.

This manuscript contains many more stories, an open letter to Israel and another to the Lebanese government and political structure.

Two Nights Out in a Row

Friday, May 21, 2004

Four students in the engineering course that I teach “Human Factors in Engineering”,  and who have taken a previous course with me last semester, decided to take me out on a Friday night.

Initially, their intention was to invite me to lunch. I suggested dinner and dancing afterward.

Elie Helou was to pick me up at the Saniour restaurant in Antelias. Hadi Haddad was driving instead: It turned out that Elie had totally wrecked his car last week.

A 3 a.m. accident made him pay a visit, reluctantly, to a public garden in Mansourieh. He forced the fences of the garden.   Elie required hospitalization for concussions and lacerations from the unwarranted Activation of four airbags and the driver’s seat belt as he claimed.

Elie is to cash in eleven thousands dollars from the fully covered car insurance.

I had taught Occupational Safety and Risk Assessment last semester and the risks of car driving were emphasized.  Apparently, this is history from the students’ viewpoints: They still drive drunk because they never get drunk, and besides, it is invariably the other drivers’ fault.

We started at the “L” bar, situated around the corner of the nightlife district of Monot, in Downtown Beirut.

The bar is a long corridor, rather dark, and the smaller segment of the “L” shaped bar might be four times larger than the corridor width.

We started with Almaza beer. The gang ordered three expensive entrees of fancy Italian names: Beef Carpaccio, Tartare de Saumon and Italian Bresaola  

Each entrée contained four slices of transparent meat, in huge large dishes that filled the table.

I joked of which entrée was beef or pork, beside the salmon of course: The pink transparent meat and the rather translucent darker meat.

Hadi was the referee because he is an Italian fan, all the way, from soccer teams, to racing cars, to volleyball teams and to argumenting.

We also ordered a few “plats de resistance” which turned out to be in the same category of lightness as the entrees were.

I learned too, at my expense, that the dish of “Risotto aux legumes croquants” is indeed rice.

Jo Assouad, the fourth student, had smartly dined at home and arrived late.

Then and only then were two bottles of Stolichnaya Russian vodka been ordered.

Not Smirnoff because as Antoine Farjallah ascertained it can cause hangover the morning after.

Two carafes of apple and cranberry juices were ready for the mixing.

Jo mixed and downed two drinks before we finished our second sip.

Antoine has just arrive from an all day beach outing. Well tanned, tired, his asthma relatively in control and still smoking cigarettes.

The vodka was mixed with either apple juice or cranberry juice;  I prefer cranberry juice but had a drink with apple juice at the coaxing of Hadi. I quickly added cranberry juice after two sips.

Hadi offered me a cigarette and I wiped out my own box of Gauloises blondes light.

To our amazement the box was running short but for one lone cigarette.  It turned out that Marlboro full flavor was unanimously king that night.

The “L” was Not up to standard that night:  Customers were supposed to start getting wild and dance by one o’clock, but by then they started leaving.

At 1:30 a.m. we left too and moved to the Music Hall Theater.

Initially, the gang planned to spend the night there but failed to secure tickets on time for the show.

We ended up at the Music Hall Theater after the show was over and danced till 2:30 a.m.

The Music Hall used to be a movie theater at the Starco district. It was redesigned to accommodate diners too.

The place was packed. The low tables were cleared up to dance on top of them.

Our table, occupied by student colleagues was not cleared yet, but a few students were dancing on top of it amid the drinks and empty glasses.

Fady Tarcha, an ex-student of mine was already standing drunk on the table. He was wildly surprised to see me. He still managed to hint on the low grade that he received last semester.

Joumana, whose name I finally recalled after several corrections due to temporary memory lapses, was fun and natural to dancing with but Tina was more reserved.

They had unobtrusive and friendly boyfriends.  It turned out that Tina was Jo’s girlfriend:  They cuddled and slow danced on any variety of music.

The singer and showman, Tony Hanna, sang a few of his medleys, carrying his traditional stick, long and bushy moustaches and long hair tied in pony tail.

I finished my night watching the movie “Gandhi” till 5:30 a.m.

Note: The role of opposition and allied political parties to the government have been reversed shortly after this article.

Big Rodents Leading the Assault for Mother Freedom (March 1, 2005)

In the last two weeks, since the assassination of former Lebanon Prime Minister Rafic Hariri on February 14, a milestone achievement was won in Lebanon.

Every night, thousands were converging to Downtown Beirut to mourn at the tomb of Prime Minister Hariri in the Place of Martyrs.  Every Monday, thousands were gathering there to demonstrate and protest.  The Lebanese people want to know who assassinated Hariri, nine of his bodyguards and counselors, ten bystanders and about a hundred civilian injured in a road blast.

The people want effective, impartial and speedy investigation in the matter.  The political leaders of the opposition refuse to do political business as usual until the perpetrators are divulged.  The people refuse to do business or are forced to shut down their stores. In fact, Lebanon is becoming a poor country and much so lately and no refreshing indications are pointing to any economical recovery. The people are duplicating the Ukrainian example by constant presence and persistent political pressures.

This Monday, February 30th, the students from various universities slept overnight in Downtown Beirut in order to circumvent the order of the Minister of the Interior, Suleiman Frangieh, to ban any demonstrations and gathering the next morning. By day break, they peacefully forced the lines of the Army units barring entrances to Beirut and flocked by the thousands to encircle the Chamber of Deputies.  The Chamber was summoned to ask the Cabinet one question: “Who assassinated Hariri?”

After the interrogation in the Chamber of Deputies, the current Prime Minister, Omar Karame, was to submit to a vote of confidence. The main slogan was: “We want our freedom, self determination and independence from the Syrian tutelage”.  A few of the corollary slogans were: “Syrian troops out of Lebanon”, “Syrian intelligence services out of Lebanon”, “Down with the Lebanese heads of intelligence services and all security agencies”, “The resignation of the shadow government” and “Bachar Assad is nominee” which means that the Syrian President should be next to go.  The only flag raised was the Lebanese flag which helped mollify the orders of the Lebanese army and internal security units to disperse demonstrators and provided a common denominator to all political factions.

The morning session of the House of Representatives saw many deputies taking full advantage of this climate of freedom and popular support.  They delivered speeches that crossed all the red lines in political discourse, euphemisms in coded words and taboos statements since 1991.  They were about to divulge details about the perfidies, machinations, threats and mafia dealings among the Syrian and Lebanese biggest rodents of the public funds.  The evening session climaxed by the resignation speech of the prime minister along with his whole Cabinet members.  It was rumored that he was the last one among the powerful ministers to be conveyed the order for the resignation of the government.

The main question now is: “What next?” The opposition is demanding a neutral government to prepare a free election for the House of Representative in mid April. Who ever heard of any neutral government?  How any neutral government can function if indeed the real and de facto government is in the hands of the security and intelligence forces?  The only option for the opposition forces in order to secure its credibility is the pressuring of the President of the Republic, General Emile Lahoud, to step down.

It is clear to all Lebanese that the security and stability of Lebanon is based on a free, democratic and stable Syria.  Until that development happens, Lebanon is in for a dangerous and very uncertain phase in its political life regardless of the vocal supports from the United States, France, the United Nations, Egypt or even Saudi Arabia.

This is a very exiting moment that we are experiencing but the nagging question remains: Lebanon was suffering many infamies and the same humiliations for many years under the same and current deputies, political leaders and ministers who are now in the opposition but used to be part and parcel of the same régime for many years before they were removed from the current government. In fact, our House of Representatives itself, elected by the Lebanese, was indeed assassinated several times in grotesque circumstances. Under the two Hariri governments which included many of the current opposition leaders several human rights laws were enacted and rescinded the next day by the same deputies by orders from Syria. For example, the procedures for legally arresting citizens are a case in point.  Not only freedom was banished but self determination was blatantly and ignominiously trampled without major protests.

Isn’t a tangible act for freedom more important than a general notion of freedom?

Isn’t a heroic stand for self determination of the highest power in the land more important than a general concept of self determination? Since when did political leaders attempt to rationally explain complicated matters to their supporters in order to show their strengths? All they had to do was to galvanize their supporters under the banners of freedom, self determination and independence from Syria in order to gather as many demonstrators as today.

So, what gives that the same leaders are so much more conscious about freedom and self determination after the assassination of a former prime minister? In fact, several months earlier, a failed attempt at the life of an opposition deputy was perpetrated; His body guard died and the deputy was in serious health conditions. Why no major demonstrations for investigating the attempted assassination were called for and political pressures not activated?

It seems that a dozen of big rodents who were devouring large holes in the cheese of our public funds and who were left out in the cold were relying on Hariri’s funding of the opposition to refill the shortages in their resources. Now that the alternative funding was assassinated the options were limited and drastic. If a political leader (zaim) is faced with the two alternatives of choosing between physical threats on his life or the cutting of funding, I have no doubts that the latter option is by far the less dangerous and less damaging to his life.

I agree with Deputy Walid Jumblatt, a leader of the minority Druze sect and speaking for the opposition, that the new generation of Lebanese youth who did not experience the long and protracted civil war has dreams that do not match the views of the traditional political parties and their leaders. The new generation does not want to be associated with the infamies and atrocities committed by their predecessors.  They care less for the sectarian rationales and little minded behaviors that drove their predecessors to eliminate one another and crawl safely into their own stuffy and narrow cantons.

The social and political climates are different and the instinct of survival of the new generation is forcing issues that the traditional local and regional powers prefer to be dormant as long as possible. The new generation is ready to accept any foreign support and aid in order to bypass this stagnant environment that is killing any opportunities for progress and self development.  The perception of the new generation is that if the old guards of Lebanon political system, including the opposition, are left to decide for its status then priorities will not change that much.  For now, freedom, self determination and independence, why not?  Next, what are the dreams and objectives of the new generation?  Would they like to have civil marriage enacted as the law of the land?  Would they like to have greater job openings and affordable lodging in order to gain the first step toward independence? Are they claiming decentralization of the administration?  Are they seeking to abolish all kinds of discrimination on the basis of origins, sects, sex, race and physical handicaps in jobs, education, and government functions?

The old guard would like to have quickly an inefficient neutral government to perpetrate the status quo.  They would like to have, pronto, a huge piece of the pie now and fast.  They are used to always have a piece of the pie regardless of the shape, form and content of the government.  Would the new generation fall in the trap again, like the previous generations, for quick relief in the political system with no pain and hard sacrifices or a new spirit is born that is not ready to take dictates from the conventional political leaders? The new generation has to organize itself and decide for themselves what they want and what should be the next steps from this critical impasse that can decide the future of Lebanon in the coming two decades.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

August 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Blog Stats

  • 1,405,294 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 756 other followers

%d bloggers like this: