Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Dubai

 

You may sell your soul for money: As long as you are not a retard

 

And you ask me why I say Arabs are retards…
BTW those are the same people the rest of the world sold their soul to for money…

That includes Americans, Europeans, and Lebanese…

A snippet of an article about Dubai from the Independent:</p><br />
<p>There are three different Dubais, all swirling around each other. There are the expats, there are the Emiratis, headed by Sheikh Mohammed; and then there is the foreign underclass who built the city, and are trapped here. They are hidden in plain view. You see them everywhere, in dirt-caked blue uniforms, being shouted at by their superiors, like a chain gang – but you are trained not to look. It is like a mantra: the Sheikh built the city. The Sheikh built the city. Workers? What workers?<br /><br />
Every evening, the hundreds of thousands of young men who build Dubai are bussed from their sites to a vast concrete wasteland an hour out of town, where they are quarantined away. Until a few years ago they were shuttled back and forth on cattle trucks, but the expats complained this was unsightly, so now they are shunted on small metal buses that function like greenhouses in the desert heat. They sweat like sponges being slowly wrung out.<br /><br />
Sonapur is a rubble-strewn patchwork of miles and miles of identical concrete buildings. Some 300,000 men live piled up here, in a place whose name in Hindi means "City of Gold". In the first camp I stop at – riven with the smell of sewage and sweat – the men huddle around, eager to tell someone, anyone, what is happening to them.<br /><br />
Sahinal Monir, a slim 24-year-old from the deltas of Bangladesh. "To get you here, they tell you Dubai is heaven. Then you get here and realise it is hell," he says. Four years ago, an employment agent arrived in Sahinal's village in Southern Bangladesh. He told the men of the village that there was a place where they could earn 40,000 takka a month (£400) just for working nine-to-five on construction projects. It was a place where they would be given great accommodation, great food, and treated well. All they had to do was pay an up-front fee of 220,000 takka (£2,300) for the work visa – a fee they'd pay off in the first six months, easy. So Sahinal sold his family land, and took out a loan from the local lender, to head to this paradise.<br /><br />
As soon as he arrived at Dubai airport, his passport was taken from him by his construction company. He has not seen it since. He was told brusquely that from now on he would be working 14-hour days in the desert heat – where western tourists are advised not to stay outside for even five minutes in summer, when it hits 55 degrees – for 500 dirhams a month (£90), less than a quarter of the wage he was promised. If you don't like it, the company told him, go home. "But how can I go home? You have my passport, and I have no money for the ticket," he said. "Well, then you'd better get to work," they replied.<br /><br />
Sahinal was in a panic. His family back home – his son, daughter, wife and parents – were waiting for money, excited that their boy had finally made it. But he was going to have to work for more than two years just to pay for the cost of getting here – and all to earn less than he did in Bangladesh.<br /><br />
He shows me his room. It is a tiny, poky, concrete cell with triple-decker bunk-beds, where he lives with 11 other men. All his belongings are piled onto his bunk: three shirts, a spare pair of trousers, and a cellphone. The room stinks, because the lavatories in the corner of the camp – holes in the ground – are backed up with excrement and clouds of black flies. There is no air conditioning or fans, so the heat is "unbearable. You cannot sleep. All you do is sweat and scratch all night." At the height of summer, people sleep on the floor, on the roof, anywhere where they can pray for a moment of breeze.<br /><br />
The water delivered to the camp in huge white containers isn't properly desalinated: it tastes of salt. "It makes us sick, but we have nothing else to drink," he says.<br /><br />
The work is "the worst in the world," he says. "You have to carry 50kg bricks and blocks of cement in the worst heat imaginable ... This heat – it is like nothing else. You sweat so much you can't pee, not for days or weeks. It's like all the liquid comes out through your skin and you stink. You become dizzy and sick but you aren't allowed to stop, except for an hour in the afternoon. You know if you drop anything or slip, you could die. If you take time off sick, your wages are docked, and you are trapped here even longer."<br /><br />
He is currently working on the 67th floor of a shiny new tower, where he builds upwards, into the sky, into the heat. He doesn't know its name. In his four years here, he has never seen the Dubai of tourist-fame, except as he constructs it floor-by-floor.<br /><br />
Is he angry? He is quiet for a long time. "Here, nobody shows their anger. You can't. You get put in jail for a long time, then deported." Last year, some workers went on strike after they were not given their wages for four months. The Dubai police surrounded their camps with razor-wire and water-cannons and blasted them out and back to work.<br /><br />
The "ringleaders" were imprisoned. I try a different question: does Sohinal regret coming? All the men look down, awkwardly. "How can we think about that? We are trapped. If we start to think about regrets..." He lets the sentence trail off. Eventually, another worker breaks the silence by adding: "I miss my country, my family and my land. We can grow food in Bangladesh. Here, nothing grows. Just oil and buildings."<br /><br />
Since the recession hit, they say, the electricity has been cut off in dozens of the camps, and the men have not been paid for months. Their companies have disappeared with their passports and their pay. "We have been robbed of everything. Even if somehow we get back to Bangladesh, the loan sharks will demand we repay our loans immediately, and when we can't, we'll be sent to prison."<br /><br />
This is all supposed to be illegal. Employers are meant to pay on time, never take your passport, give you breaks in the heat – but I met nobody who said it happens. Not one. These men are conned into coming and trapped into staying, with the complicity of the Dubai authorities.<br /><br />
Sahinal could well die out here. A British man who used to work on construction projects told me: "There's a huge number of suicides in the camps and on the construction sites, but they're not reported. They're described as 'accidents'." Even then, their families aren't free: they simply inherit the debts. A Human Rights Watch study found there is a "cover-up of the true extent" of deaths from heat exhaustion, overwork and suicide, but the Indian consulate registered 971 deaths of their nationals in 2005 alone. After this figure was leaked, the consulates were told to stop counting.<br /><br />
At night, in the dusk, I sit in the camp with Sohinal and his friends as they scrape together what they have left to buy a cheap bottle of spirits. They down it in one ferocious gulp. "It helps you to feel numb", Sohinal says through a stinging throat. In the distance, the glistening Dubai skyline he built stands, oblivious.

A snippet of an article about Dubai from the Independent:

There are three different Dubais, all swirling around each other.

There are the expats, there are the Emiratis, headed by Sheikh Mohammed; and then there is the foreign underclass who built the city, and are trapped here.

They are hidden in plain view. You see them everywhere, in dirt-caked blue uniforms, being shouted at by their superiors, like a chain gang – but you are trained not to look.

It is like a mantra: the Sheikh built the city. The Sheikh built the city. Workers? What workers?

Every evening, the hundreds of thousands of young men who build Dubai are bussed from their sites to a vast concrete wasteland an hour out of town, where they are quarantined away.

Until a few years ago they were shuttled back and forth on cattle trucks, but the expats complained this was unsightly, so now they are shunted on small metal buses that function like greenhouses in the desert heat. They sweat like sponges being slowly wrung out.

Sonapur is a rubble-strewn patchwork of miles and miles of identical concrete buildings. Some 300,000 men live piled up here, in a place whose name in Hindi means “City of Gold“.

In the first camp I stop at – riven with the smell of sewage and sweat – the men huddle around, eager to tell someone, anyone, what is happening to them.

Sahinal Monir, a slim 24-year-old from the deltas of Bangladesh. “To get you here, they tell you Dubai is heaven. Then you get here and realise it is hell,” he says.

Four years ago, an employment agent arrived in Sahinal’s village in Southern Bangladesh. He told the men of the village that there was a place where they could earn 40,000 takka a month (£400) just for working nine-to-five on construction projects.

It was a place where they would be given great accommodation, great food, and treated well.

All they had to do was pay an up-front fee of 220,000 takka (£2,300) for the work visa – a fee they’d pay off in the first six months, easy. So Sahinal sold his family land, and took out a loan from the local lender, to head to this paradise.

As soon as he arrived at Dubai airport, his passport was taken from him by his construction company. He has not seen it since. He was told brusquely that from now on he would be working 14-hour days in the desert heat – where western tourists are advised not to stay outside for even five minutes in summer, when it hits 55 degrees – for 500 dirhams a month (£90), less than a quarter of the wage he was promised.

If you don’t like it, the company told him, go home. “But how can I go home? You have my passport, and I have no money for the ticket,” he said. “Well, then you’d better get to work,” they replied.

Sahinal was in a panic. His family back home – his son, daughter, wife and parents – were waiting for money, excited that their boy had finally made it. But he was going to have to work for more than two years just to pay for the cost of getting here – and all to earn less than he did in Bangladesh.

He shows me his room. It is a tiny, poky, concrete cell with triple-decker bunk-beds, where he lives with 11 other men. All his belongings are piled onto his bunk: three shirts, a spare pair of trousers, and a cellphone. The room stinks, because the lavatories in the corner of the camp – holes in the ground – are backed up with excrement and clouds of black flies. There is no air conditioning or fans, so the heat is “unbearable. You cannot sleep.

All you do is sweat and scratch all night.” At the height of summer, people sleep on the floor, on the roof, anywhere where they can pray for a moment of breeze.

The water delivered to the camp in huge white containers isn’t properly desalinated: it tastes of salt. “It makes us sick, but we have nothing else to drink,” he says.

The work is “the worst in the world,” he says. “You have to carry 50kg bricks and blocks of cement in the worst heat imaginable … This heat – it is like nothing else. You sweat so much you can’t pee, not for days or weeks. It’s like all the liquid comes out through your skin and you stink. You become dizzy and sick but you aren’t allowed to stop, except for an hour in the afternoon.

You know if you drop anything or slip, you could die.

If you take time off sick, your wages are docked, and you are trapped here even longer.”
He is currently working on the 67th floor of a shiny new tower, where he builds upwards, into the sky, into the heat. He doesn’t know its name.

In his four years here, he has never seen the Dubai of tourist-fame, except as he constructs it floor-by-floor.
Is he angry? He is quiet for a long time. “Here, nobody shows their anger. You can’t. You get put in jail for a long time, then deported.”

Last year, some workers went on strike after they were not given their wages for four months. The Dubai police surrounded their camps with razor-wire and water-cannons and blasted them out and back to work.
The “ringleaders” were imprisoned.

I try a different question: does Sohinal regret coming? All the men look down, awkwardly. “How can we think about that? We are trapped. If we start to think about regrets…” He lets the sentence trail off. Eventually, another worker breaks the silence by adding: “I miss my country, my family and my land. We can grow food in Bangladesh. Here, nothing grows. Just oil and buildings.”

Since the recession hit, they say, the electricity has been cut off in dozens of the camps, and the men have not been paid for months. Their companies have disappeared with their passports and their pay. “We have been robbed of everything. Even if somehow we get back to Bangladesh, the loan sharks will demand we repay our loans immediately, and when we can’t, we’ll be sent to prison.”

This is all supposed to be illegal.

Employers are meant to pay on time, never take your passport, give you breaks in the heat – but I met nobody who said it happens. Not one. These men are conned into coming and trapped into staying, with the complicity of the Dubai authorities.
Sahinal could well die out here.

A British man who used to work on construction projects told me: “There’s a huge number of suicides in the camps and on the construction sites, but they’re not reported. They’re described as ‘accidents’.”

Even then, their families aren’t free: they simply inherit the debts.

A Human Rights Watch study found there is a “cover-up of the true extent” of deaths from heat exhaustion, overwork and suicide, but the Indian consulate registered 971 deaths of their nationals in 2005 alone.

After this figure was leaked, the consulates were told to stop counting.
At night, in the dusk, I sit in the camp with Sohinal and his friends as they scrape together what they have left to buy a cheap bottle of spirits. They down it in one ferocious gulp.

“It helps you to feel numb”, Sohinal says through a stinging throat. In the distance, the glistening Dubai skyline he built stands, oblivious.

“Thank you Beirut”. For what ya 7abibteh? Don’t mention it…

 published in the Huff Post World this April 28, 2013

“Before I left for my trip to Lebanon this December, my 84-year-old neighbor told me about the fantastic nightlife in Beirut.  She had visited the city after World War II, while her husband was stationed in Europe.  She told me about Beirut’s unique blend of European sophistication and liberal leanings in an Arab milieu.  Just about 150 miles from Cyprus on the Mediterranean, Beirut served as a gateway to the Middle East.

Flash forward to today.

A generation of Lebanese disenfranchised by 15 years of civil war, a technical state of war with Israel, the presence of the Hezbollah in Lebanon and the war in Syria have contributed to the decline of Beirut as a safe, reliable point of entry into the Middle East.  As a result, the soul of Beirut’s Western-leaning temperament was mimicked in Disney-esque style by the city of Dubai. And it’s a crying shame.

It’s sad because Dubai is now viewed as the preeminent, “culturally westernized?” city in the region.

Dubai, as an urban personification of the West, is the spoiled little boy who has to have the biggest piece of candy. It’s a place with Texas-inspired adoration for the new, big and sparkly; a town with a New Yorker’s greed to have more.  Cops drive in Lamborghinis.  Visitors party at nightclubs imported from Las Vegas, Amsterdam and… Beirut.

Yes, “Music Hall,” Beirut’s hippest nightclub, just opened this January in Dubai. And although Condé Nast travelers ranked Dubai’s hotels and resorts as the best in the Middle East, Beirut was listed as the best city. In fact, the quaint but touristy town of Byblos in Lebanon was ranked ahead of Dubai.  The city’s pitiful score in the category of “culture” is what dragged it down in the rankings.

Why should Americans care?

Because the continued chaos of the Middle East has frightened us away from visiting this pivotal region of the world.   Like it or not, Americans are part of one global family.

We need to know our brothers and sisters. Places like Lebanon, not Dubai, should serve as stepping stone to help us appreciate and experience some of what the Middle East has to offer. Putting the region’s current military strife aside, what do Americans miss by traveling to Dubai instead of Lebanon?

The resiliency of Beirut, a city that’s been destroyed and rebuilt 7 times.

A place that’s been infused with an independent streak since Constantine turned the Roman Empire Christian, yet many still flocked to the pagan outpost of Baalbek to celebrate the gods of Jupiter and Bacchus.  Yes, Bacchus.  Because wine was first cultivated in the Beqaa Valley.

Over a thousand years before Dubai is mentioned in historical record, the Phoenicians were trading shiploads of wine with Carthage. It’s a country where you can ski in the morning and be on the beach in the afternoon. And that’s right, the food and the nightlife are incredible.

Americans have the power to wield our military might on whomever we deem as terrorists, or friends of terrorists, or factions who might help terrorists. We’ve agreed that the War on Terror is a boundary-less fight; we’re no longer fighting nations, but radical sects.

Yet the presence of the Hezbollah in Lebanon has seemingly damned the entire nation as a country riddled with terrorists. It’s a double standard, applied to one of our closest ally’s enemies.

Yes, the Hezbollah has perpetrated horrible crimes against Americans, and their radical destructive approach is unacceptable. To the Lebanese, they are an accepted political party, holding 14 of the 128 seats in Lebanon’s Parliament. They wield a fair amount of power for a variety of reasons.

Lebanon’s parliament operates in a delicate tension as its seats are pre-determined based on religious affiliation. However, the composition of those seats doesn’t match the religious distribution of the populace.  The infighting this construct creates enables other players, like the Hezbollah, more latitude than might be expected.

Importantly though, the Hezbollah provides support for a selected component of the Lebanese population in a way its government cannot. And their radical message is also, for whatever dark reason, attracting members. Without a stronger Lebanese government, supported by a more robust economy, power in factions such as this will continue to grow.

Lebanon needs our help. The majority of the Lebanese would prefer to stay out of the Syrian war next door, but the madness is seeping across its borders.

Lebanon has yet to fully recover from its own civil war, and may very well be drawn into this one. This will only make it harder for Lebanon to build up the economic power it needs to reestablish its presence in the Levant.

Rather than invest in another rock star-themed restaurant in Dubai, I challenge an American coalition to help build a national railroad in Lebanon. This basic infrastructure will open the country to trade and tourism, and alleviate the miserable traffic that hampers the country’s efficiency. A stronger economy will empower the government.

The government’s renewed strength can help control radical factions which seek to bring harm to members of our global society. Lebanon can reassert itself as a welcoming place for Americans. And Americans can learn to become citizens of the world, not just of our country

Note: If not for Hezbollah resistance against Israel preemptive wars on Lebanon in 2006, Lebanon would have disappeared from the political map.

Refrain of naming your establishment Lebanon: Civil War will break out…

The Pan-Arabia Enquirer published a humoristic fiction story under Civil war breaks out across Lebanon Island

The beach resort of The World development off the coast of Dubai,and the island of Lebanon being one of them, where the scene of sectarian violence erupted.

DUBAI: Just two weeks after it was opened as a luxurious beach club, the island of Lebanon, part of The World development project off the coast of Dubai, one of the Arab Gulf Emirates, has erupted into civil war.

Gunfire on the island was heard from mainland Dubai yesterday afternoon, and by the evening there had been reports of fierce street battles amid the island’s five-star facilities.

While journalists have been kept at bay from the island through its inflated membership fees, various messages received from Lebanon’s resident workers suggest that sectarian violence was sparked after an incident by the pool on Saturday morning regarding a sun-lounger and a club sandwich.

Within hours, this had spread to other parts off the exclusive resort, with various opposing factions taking control of different ‘zones’ and the central grassy area designated ‘no man’s land’, kept under watchful eye by snipers camped out in the changing rooms.

“There’s are two full bottles of Chateau Neuf du Pape 1978 and a Dom Perignon sitting on the bar counter, but nobody wants to get them for fear of getting shot. It’s such a waste,” one member who managed to escape from the island told The Pan-Arabia Enquirer.

Various countries have said they are now considering sending emergency transportation to the island to rescue those caught in the middle of the escalating violence, and the UN Security Council is to meet tomorrow to discuss the situation.

At least one member is expected to use their veto vote to ensure nothing happens.

Government officials in Israel yesterday said they were “deeply concerned” with the possibility of groups loyal to Hezbollah using the island as a launch pad for attacks to the neighbouring island that could or could not be Israel, depending on who you ask.

“We’ve sent troops to Lebanon before and we’re not afraid to do it again, albeit on a slightly smaller scale and in a completely different place,” fantastic Israeli president Benjamin Netanyahu told reporters.

Further complications are likely to emerge with refugees escaping violence on the island of Syria expected to descend upon Lebanon in the coming days.

Note: I jumped at the link on facebook sent by Reine Azzi

States Blackmails: Elected by multinational money?  (Apr. 19, 2010)

            Frequently, politics of governments, especially in election campaign periods, is to blow sands and divert the attention of citizens from the nasty important issues in order to cover up huge financial wastes in forms of aids to multinationals that contributed to finance election campaigns.

Two examples might shed lights to the direct connections among issues meant to sidetrack citizens and the critical problems that affected societies.

            After the latest financial crash, President Sarkozy of France bailed out the French financial institutions with over 20 billions dollars with no return whatsoever to the French treasury; not even a share of the French State in these institutions. The social security was in deficit of over 22 billions dollars and the French citizens were asked to tighten their belt along with reduced health care benefits, welfare systems, and retirement rights.  The government of Sarkozy tried to obscure this striking blunder by bringing up the irrelevant issue of Moslem women wearing veils in schools and public administrations.

To put things in perspective, only 400 Moslem women among all the Moslem communities in France wore veils.  The French voters were not duped by this political gimmick and defeated hands down the party of Sarkozy in the latest municipal election.

            The same process occurred in 1988 in the USA. Vice President Bush Senior was campaigning for the Presidency to replace Ronald Reagan.  Bush Senior had extended 500 billions dollars to the saving and loans financial institutions with no return to the Federal treasury. Thus, Bush Senior took out the skeleton of “patriotism” from the closet as his campaign slogan; mainly, banning the burning of the US flags.  

To put this slogan in perspective, only seven flags were burned that year in all the USA.  Since the saving and loans had contributed massively to re-elections of 90% of the members of the House of Representatives, then this House supported the slogan of the campaign. The Supreme Court intervened and cancelled this faked and unlawful act that abridged the liberty of expression of the US citizens.

The objective political observer can discover very high correlations linking faked campaign issues and huge highway robbery of financially aiding multinationals.

            Sarkozy was defeated in the municipal election for another very serious trampling of France dignity, honor, and sovereignty. The ultra Zionist Sarkozy made it his policy to tone down all Israel’s attempts at dishonoring the status of France.  For example, in 2009 two incidents in Israel were covered up; the director of French cultural center in Naplouse (Palestine) was beaten badly by Israeli soldiers; one soldiers said “I can kill you”.  

The other incident happened in Gaza during Israel slaughter war there.  Soldiers barged in the residence of the French consul and stole expensive and luxury items. In 2008, the consulate of France in Jerusalem was detained 17 hours in abject conditions. In 2009, French Foreign Affairs Bernard Kouchner met Israel’s racist Foreign Affairs Lieberman and then turned a blind eye to the new construction phase of 900 apartments in Jerusalem.  This year, Kouchner bowed down to the demand of Israel not to visit Gaza. Palestinian students in Gaza with scholarships to studying in France were denied passports to leave this sad enclave.

            Sarkozy lied to the French people in 2008 when Israel invaded Gaza claiming that Israel was reacting to Hamas missiles; facts from the Israeli Foreign Affairs documents stated that Hamas had respected the deal and no missile had fallen in Israel till November when Israel launched her savage pre-emptive war on Gaza.  Sarkozy is leading the file of Western hawks encouraging bombing of Iran. Before Iran, Israel used to demand pre-requisites of bombing Egypt and then Iraq before resuming any negotiations with the Palestinians.

            Gaza is suffering the worst economical blockades.  French Ambassador to Israel Christophe Bigot stated: “Gaza is receiving foodstuff through tunnels: saying there is blocus of Gaza is a strong term”.  The demolished hospital in Gaza that France had extended assistance to rebuild and that Israel agreed to facilitate the task is still undone: Israel has blocked the arrival of the necessary materials.  

Lately, Sarkozy is defying the European Union laws prohibiting imports of products from Israel colonies in the West Bank; he went as far as prosecuting any French company abiding by the EU laws and instructing judges to crackdown on law abiding French enterprises.  Britain reacted mildly by discrediting the Israeli military attaché in London after the blunder of the Mossad’s assassination of a Hamas leader in Dubai using European forged passports, including French passports; France Sarkozy didn’t make any waves of that incident.

The Third Republic of Lebanon: The Tayyar of Michel Aoun (June 1, 2009)

 

            The formal and extensive visits of Michel Aoun to Iran and then to Syria had three purposes.  First, it was symbolic of “breaking bread and sharing salt” which meant that confidence is established and hidden agendas will be stated clearly among friends. The second purpose was to focus attention on the ethnic and religious minorities so that Iran and Syria would exercise more leverage to preserving the persecuted minorities in Iraq. The third purpose was to exposing the draft program of the Third Republic that need to be instituted in Lebanon in order to relieve Iran and Syria from constant worries on the potential political and strategic orientation of Lebanon; thus, relying on Iran and Syria to exercise their influence toward stabilizing an environment of security and peace within Lebanon.

            General and Deputy Aoun had absorbed the various failures of other Christian Lebanese leaders for establishing a lasting stable political system that would save Lebanon of recurring civil wars.  A unified Christian front in Lebanon is not enough to bringing peace and security; this fact Michel Aoun experienced when he was appointed Prime Minister in 1988 and ended in his exile to France.  The most striking recent experiment was the tenure of ex-President Emile Lahoud.

            Lahoud intended to eradicate corruption in the State while maintaining strategic relations with Syria and supporting the Lebanese resistance in the south against Israel’s occupation.  Lahoud failed in his attempts for reforms of the social and political system because he had no civilian political movement and had no previous communication with the deputies in the Parliament.  Lahoud managed to press forward on the corruption front in the first 3 years until Syria realized that the reforms were going too far and driving its Lebanese political supporters to frantic seizures. The incarcerated officials indicted with corruption and stealing the treasury were released from prison and Rafic Hariri returned as Prime Minister to resume his service and real estate economy based on heavy borrowing.

As Syria was under pressure in 2005 to withdraw its troops then it decided to extend the tenure of Lahoud another 3 years.  The UN resolution 1559 for Syria withdrawal, the Lebanese army to expand to the southern borders, and Hezbollah to turn over its heavy artillery to the army pointed to a dramatic clash which culminated in the assassination of Rafic Hariri.  External interventions bolstered the internal confessional forces to side track reforms and forced the Presidency into a defensive corner; thus, not only clipping any remnant of official power but eliminating the role of the Presidency and the Christian necessity for a stable Lebanon among its religious affiliations.

 

What is the Third Republic and what is its strategy? First, the new Republic will bolster the rights, duties, and responsibilities of the President of the Republic and reduce the exclusive privileges of the Prime Minister to administering several “black boxes” such as emergency funds, development and construction council, repatriation of Lebanese refugees’ box, and disaster box that should be returned to the relevant ministries.  These reforms do not require any amendments to the Taef Constitution.

 

Second, the Third Republic wants to desist on reducing the economy of Lebanon to the service sector that it can no longer compete with newer and powerful centers in the region like Dubai, Cyprus, Jordan, and Egypt.  The economy has to revert to basics and develop on industrial and agricultural production, exploiting our water resources, managing better our electrical power generation, and expanding and modernizing our communication facilities. Health for all and education for all at affordable costs are priorities.

 

Third, the reduction of our heavy borrowing policy that reached over 60 billions dollars with the purpose of settling the Palestinians in Lebanon in return of canceling this mighty debt will be tackled in earnest.  I lean to the possibility that if negotiations with the lending parties are not successful then the new government will decree the cancellation of any lending that was politically motivated.  I doubt that reactions would extend beyond the rhetorical recriminations because the case is strong that Lebanon had no collateral economical generation potentials for these generous lending.  As a consequence, the Third Republic will put an end to any international policies attempts to reside the Palestinians in Lebanon.

 

Fourth, the Third Republic will relieve Hezbollah from the constant pressures of international plans targeted at coercing the disarmament of the resistance by coordinate activities with non-patriotic governments that are wiling to cohabitate with the enemy Israel.  This united front will force Israel to desist from any further incursions into Lebanon.

 

Fifth, the Third Republic will move ahead with an alternative election law based on proportionality and revisiting laws that deny equality between genders and secular national civil status laws.

 

Sixth, the Third Republic will demand joint negotiations with Syria relative peace agreements with Israel after recapturing the Shebaa Farms and the Hills of Kfarshouba.

 

The first step in the strategy was for the Christians to regain confidence and stand up to their responsibilities and acknowledging that Israel is the enemy.  This was done.  The second step was an alliance with Hezbollah which defeated many plans to resurrect the specter of the civil war.  The third step was direct contacts with States as representing the largest Christian Parliamentary bloc and opening channels of communications and entente.  The fourth step is wining the majority seats in the Parliament.

 

Lebanon Parliament was expanded in 1992 to include 128 deputies; 64 Christians and 64 Moslems.  The election in June 7 is calling on 3, 260,000 voters to participate and most probably more than 50% will effectively vote. Among the eligible voters of over 21 years of age 888,000 are Moslem Shiaas (27 deputies in total), 874,000 Moslem Sunnis (27 deputies), 698,000 Christian Maronites (34 deputies), 243,000 Christian Greek Orthodox (concentrated in the districts of Ashrafieh and Koura), 186, 000 Moslem Druze (8 deputies concentrated in the districts of Chouf, Aley, and Hasbaya), 163, 000 Greek Catholics, and dozen of other Christian minorities and Armenians (concentrated in Ashrafieh, Burj Hammoud, and Anjar).  The Moslem Alawis of about 27,000 are entitled to 2 deputies.

            In the previous election of 2005, the Tayyar of Michel Aoun without the support of any alliances managed to secure 20 Christian deputies representing 70% of the Christian voters but the Lebanese political system denied this large bloc any governmental representation for 4 years until the Dawha agreement.  The law of this election that correspond to the law of 1960 divides Lebanon into 26 districts called “Kada2” and most of the Christians candidates do not have to rely on Moslem voters for their election.  With the alliance of the “Marada Party” of Suleiman Frangieh in Zghorta, Betroun, and Koura the Tayyar can secure additional 8 deputies.  With the alliance of the Hezbollah the Tayyar can add 3 deputies in the district of B3abda and two more in Jezzine. Thus, if the Tayyar of Michel Aoun sustains the previous election victory then he should expect no less than 27 deputies and over 40 Christian deputies allied to the Tayyar or one third of the Parliament. If we add to this Christian bloc the deputies of Hezbollah and AMAL (over 24 deputies) and the Syrian National Social Party (about 4 deputies) and the Druze and Sunni deputies then the opposition will clearly win the majority of the Parliament.  Thus the Prime Minister will be selected from the opposition and most of the key ministerial posts would revert to the opposition along with a reshuffling of the main first order administrative officials.

 

            The Tayyar is taking the shape of a popular revolution intended to defeating the privileges of the feudal, caste, confessional, and monopolist system. It has no alternative but to follow the legitimate democratic route under this complex social diversity.

 

            As I mentioned in another post, if the Christians do not emerge in this election with a unified and powerful centralized bloc then the chances are that a system based on splitting power among Shiaa, Sunni, and Christians (muthalateh) would be inevitable, even at the expense of a short civil war.  Most probably the civil war would start between Shiaas and Sunnis but will quickly degenerate to fighting between Christians and Sunnis because the Shiaas have already their cantons. This alternative system would be legitimate demographically and the Christian would contend with third of the administration and political power offices.

 

Note 1: My spirit went to statesman General Aoun who said once the Syrian troops crossed the borders in April 2005 “Syria is now out of Lebanon.  I have no qualms with Syria anymore. This is the time to open a new page in our relations”.  The Tayyar has a TV channel and a blog; it has established a radio channe a couple of days ago; but I am under the impression that, excluding the members of the Tayyar, the supporters are on the one way communication receiving end. The brochure of the program of the Tayyar has no phone numbers, no email addresses and no central mailing address. I once sent a hand written letter to Deputy Ibrahim Kanaan and it had to go through two intermediaries of the Tayyar; obviously, I never received a reply. 

 

Note 2: I am suggesting to the Tayyar to install central mediating centers in each district so that deputies would handle the various complaints from their respective constituencies, sort of “wassit al kada2”.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

September 2020
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