Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Ebola

Tidbits #28

10 USA companies shifting from making underwear and t-shirts to fix the medical-mask problem

Pandemics breaking out every 100 years since 1320?

Iceland, which is able to test its entire population, found half of those who tested positive had no symptoms.

There’s very little in history to convince us that states are keen on giving back powers once they’ve been awarded. A state of emergency, they said, is justified if the threat is public, universal, and existential, and if the extraordinary powers are authorized by the people, limited in time, and proportional. Covid-19, which has been called “the great equalizer,” certainly fits the first half of that description, but what of the second?

Russia medical team in Italy: “Le COVID-19 n’est pas le vecteur d’une bio-attaque mais un écran de camouflage cachant l’usage d’un autre vecteur inconnu, lequel ne serait pas chimique mais bien biologique.

It is 5 am and watching a documentary on ARTE on Ebola in Liberia. How families were exiled from towns as the virus claimed entire families as in Bong… Death rate of Ebola reached 90% of cases.

COVID-19 has devastated Nashulai, the award-winning Maasai-led nature conservancy in Kenya. The brave community behind this visionary conservation project are staring starvation and destitution in the face. The conservancy relies on tourism, and it’s collapsed. As a result, there have been massive job losses amongst the Maasai who live there. There’s no money, no food, and no healthcare. With rangers laid off, and poverty rising, poachers could soon prey on the conservancy’s amazing wildlife.

I looked at detailed map of the ancient and current Silk Road and connecting rail transport. and ports. Turkey and Iran are mightily in. Syria and Iraq are totally out of it. So why USA, France and England had to destroy and ruin Iraq and Syria? No economic benefit to be generated from this destruction, so why this onslaught?

And why the US Air Force selected this period of pandemics to deploy its stealth B-2 Spirit in European bases?  L’annonce vient du «US European Command» de Stuttgart, le commandement européen des États-Unis. Il est sous les ordres du général Tod D. Wolters à la tête des forces de l’Otan en tant que commandant suprême allié en Europe (SACEUR). L’ «US European Command» précise que la «task force», composée d’un nombre non précisé de bombardiers provenant de la base de Whiteman au Missouri, «est arrivée le 9 mars à Lajes Field dans les Açorres, au Portugal»,

Stealth B-2 Spirit coût dépasse les $ deux milliards de dollars. Chaque appareil peut transporter 16 bombes thermonucléaires B-61 ou B-83, avec une puissance maximale totale équivalente à plus de 1.200 bombes d’Hiroshima. 

The sephardic Jews, those from the Middle East and North Africa, are from the same original roots of the people of the Land, and even their religion is founded on the same stories, customs and traditions of the Land. When they shoot to kill a Palestinian, they are actually assassinating their own father, mother, sisters and brothers. And yet, they are more racist than the “white” Ashkenazim Jews who immigrated from Europe and adopted the German Zionist colonial ideology and transplanted it into Israel.

As if climbing down a mountain is any easier than reaching the top. Before you plan any kinds of climbing, consider studying the topography of the mountain: The safe descent paths must be of higher priority.
I suppose you have climbed a small hill in your life, at least when a kid.  A few of us have climbed high mountain tops, Not with rope and gears for steep climbs of professionals. Still, steep enough for goats…
I am pretty sure you don’t recall how the  mountain was climbed, but you certainly recall the nightmarish downhill challenge to reach your parked car…
The reduced energy can be a factor, but not as essential in your horror recalls…All it takes to climb is two feet, and a couple of hands, and possibly a stick…Coming down could be easier if you remembered to add a few inches of fat on your buttock, and sewed a sturdy patch where it counts. You discover that somehow your feet are redundant going down, hands are still excellent for equilibrium and grabbing on something as downhill speed increases, involuntarily…

Dignity is an accumulation of deeds and holding to right positions. Star with one bold action of “doing what is right” and the rest is a normal way of life of a dignified person. Al 7ayaat wakfat 3ezz fakat

Greece and the Near-East, kept creating myths, but living Gods, proportional to human comprehension. Current myths are out of our comprehension.

Let’s go around the room. And We have Ebola

September 28, 2014

Two purposes of user feedback

What’s a customer worth?

A customer at the local supermarket or at the corner Fedex Print shop might spend $10,000 or even $25,000 over the course of a few years.

That’s why marketers are so willing to spend so much time and money on coupons, promos and ads getting people to start doing business with us.

But what happens when it goes wrong?

What if a service slip or a policy choice threatens that long-term relationship?

If you know what’s broken, you can fix it for all the customers that follow.

It seems obvious, but you want to hear what customers have to say. After all, if people in charge realize what’s not working, the thinking is that they might want to change it.

At the same time, a critical but often overlooked benefit of open customer communication is that individuals want to be heard. Your disgruntled customer doesn’t want to hear you to make excuses, and possibly doesn’t even want you to fix yesterday’s problem (probably too late for that), but she does want to know that you know, that you care, and that it’s not going to happen again.

Merely listening, really listening, might be enough.

Big organizations (and smaller, unenlightened ones) grab onto the data benefit and tend to ignore the “listening” one. Worse still, in their desire to isolate themselves from customers, they industralize and mechanize the process of gathering data (in the name of scale) and squeeze all the juiciness out of it.

If you live in the US, you might try calling 800-398-0242. That’s the number Fedex Print lists on all their receipts, hoping for customer feedback.

It’s hard to imagine a happy customer working her way through all of these menus and buttons and clicks, and harder still to imagine an annoyed customer being happy to do all of this data processing for them.

The alternative is pretty simple: if you’re about to lose a $10,000 customer, put the cell phone number of the regional manager on the receipt. That’s what you and I would do if we owned the place, wouldn’t we?

Answer the phone and listen. It’s an essay test, not multiple choice.

When in doubt, be human.

We have Ebola

It’s tragic but not surprising to watch the marketing of another epidemic unfold.

It starts with, “We” don’t have Ebola, “they” do.

They live somewhere else, or look different or speak another language. Our kneejerk reaction is that “they” need to be isolated from us (more than 55% of Americans favor a travel ban for everyone, not just the sick).

Even 50 years ago, a travel ban was difficult, now it’s impossible. The world is porous, there are more connections than ever, and we’ve seen this before.

Tuberculosis. Polio. AIDS.

Fear runs rampant, amplified by the media, a rising cycle of misinformation, demonization and panic. Fear of the other. Pushing us apart and paralyzing us.

The thing is:

We are they.

They are us.

Education—clear, fact-based and actionable education—is the single most effective thing we can do during the early stages of a contagion.

Diseases (and ideas) spread because of the social structures we have created, and we can re-engineer those interactions to dramatically change the R0 of a virus.

Ebola doesn’t ‘know’ that large funerals are traditional, but it certainly takes advantage of them to spread. Ideas don’t ‘know’ that bad news travels fast, and that the internet makes ideas travel faster, but they take advantage of this to spread.

Cable TV voices that induce panic to make their ratings go up are directly complicit in amplifying the very reactions that magnify the impact of the virus. Attention-seeking media voices take us down. All of us.

It’s tempting to panic, or to turn away, or to lock up or isolate everyone who makes us nervous. But we can (and must) do better than that.

Panic, like terror, is also a virus, one that spreads.

We have an urgent and tragic medical problem, no doubt, but we also have a marketing problem.

Let’s go around the room

If you say that in a meeting, you’ve failed.

You’ve abdicated responsibility and just multiplied the time wasted by the number of people in the room.

When we go around the room, everyone in the room spends the entire time before their turn thinking about what to say, and working to say something fairly unmemorable.

And of course, this endless litany of ‘saying’ leads to little in the way of listening or response or interaction or action of any kind.

The worst example I ever saw of this was when Barry Diller did it in a meeting with 220 attendees. More than two hours later, everyone in the room was bleeding from their ears in boredom.

Leaders of meetings can do better.

Call on people. Shape the conversation. Do your homework in advance and figure out who has something to say, and work hard to create interactions.

Either that or just send a memo and cancel the whole thing. It’s easier and probably more effective.

True Hell: Wearing the Ebola designed suits in hot and humid Africa

Must be the additional Tenth circle of Hell in Dantes.

The suffocating weather, heavy and complicated suit, emotions, fears, desperation… and realization that about 50% of whom we are treating and getting attached to will die.

L’équipement de protection individuel se compose de différents éléments : des bottes, une combinaison, un masque, une cagoule, un tablier, des lunettes et deux paires de gants.

Pour revêtir cette tenue, il faut respecter scrupuleusement la procédure car aucun millimètre de peau ne doit être exposé.

« La chaleur devient vraiment insupportable. Il fait très humide et, vu mon état de fatigue, je ne tiens pas très longtemps dans ma combinaison de protection. La sueur coule sur mes yeux et fait crisser mes gants.

Nous devons nous rendre rapidement dans la zone suivante et placer les corps dans les housses mortuaires avant de nous sentir vraiment mal. »

C’est ce qu’explique Cokie, une spécialiste en eau et assainissement britannique qui travaille dans un centre Ebola de Médecins Sans Frontières.

« Si Dante avait imaginé un dixième cercle de l’Enfer, c’eût été celui-là. »

Cette bataille contre le virus Ebola, ce sont des hommes et des femmes qui la livrent. Car il n’existe toujours pas de médicament pour soigner les malades, aucun vaccin pour protéger les populations à risque.

La seule chose que nous pouvons faire, c’est dispenser des soins de soutien aux patients, pour les aider à gagner le combat contre le virus. C’est un travail extrêmement pénible.

Psychologiquement, c’est très difficile car malgré la meilleure prise en charge possible, la moitié des patients ne survivra pas à la maladie. Physiquement aussi, ce travail est terriblement éprouvant : sous la chaleur tropicale, impossible de supporter plus d’une heure les tenues de protection et aider les patients gravement malades à manger et à boire, les laver et les changer est épuisant.

À ces pressions psychologiques et physiques s’ajoute le risque de contamination. Le 14 octobre 2014, 21 collaborateurs de Médecins Sans Frontières, dont deux membres du personnel international, avaient été eux aussi contaminés par le virus. Seize d’entre eux sont décédés.

Ceux qui sont guéris et peuvent rentrer chez eux sont souvent confrontés à la peur, aux doutes et parfois même à la stigmatisation sociale. Ebola fait peur, même au delà de l’Afrique de l’Ouest.

Je veux montrer aux habitants de l’Afrique de l’Ouest que nous ne les abandonnons pas à leur sort.»Evita,infirmière

Pourtant, Médecins Sans Frontières n’a aucun mal à trouver des candidats prêts à partir travailler dans ses centres Ebola. Plusieurs centaines de MSF travaillent ensemble avec des milliers de collègues nationaux. Malgré les conditions difficiles, tout le monde est très motive.

« J’étais en mission en Afghanistan avec MSF lorsque l’épidémie d’Ebola a éclaté » explique Evita, une infirmière néerlandaise. « On se posait souvent la question entre collègues : “tu irais, toi ?”. Une fois chez moi, je n’ai pas tardé à prendre la décision. De partir. De venir en aide. De montrer aux habitants de l’Afrique de l’Ouest que nous ne les abandonnons pas à leur sort. »

Photo de couverture © Caroline Van Nespen/MSF. Photos © John Moore/Getty Images.

Aliénation

L’équipement de protection individuel se compose de différents éléments : des bottes, une combinaison, un masque, une cagoule, un tablier, des lunettes et deux paires de gants. Pour revêtir cette tenue, il faut respecter scrupuleusement la procédure car aucun millimètre de peau ne doit être exposé.

Il faut donc toujours entrer à deux dans la zone d’habillage, pour pouvoir se contrôler mutuellement. Une fois protégé par cette « armure », il faut travailler vite et bien, car au bout d’une heure, il faut déjà retirer sa tenue, tant le risque de « surchauffe » et de déshydratation est élevé.

Mais travailler vite et efficacement n’a rien d’évident avec cet équipement qui semble ralentir tous vos mouvements, qui vous fait ruisseler de sueur et qui exige beaucoup de concentration, ne serait-ce que pour respirer.

« Au début, on a vraiment du mal à se déplacer, » explique Charlotte, une infirmière française. « On se demande, Bon Dieu, comment arriver à faire son boulot sans fondre en larmes. Il fait une chaleur torride, le soleil brûle. Mais on finit par s’habituer. Les tâches à accomplir prennent le dessus et on finit presque par oublier sa tenue.

Mais après une heure, on est complètement trempé ; dans les bottes, la sueur ruisselle jusqu’aux chevilles et il y a tellement de buée qu’on ne voit pratiquement plus rien à travers les lunettes. À ce moment-là, on sait qu’il est temps de sortir. »

Une telle tenue vous rend méconnaissable. Beaucoup de médecins et d’infirmiers écrivent donc leur nom sur leur combinaison pour que les patients puissent reconnaître ceux qui vont s’occuper d’eux.

Ou alors, ils utilisent des symboles pour s’identifier, par exemple des fleurs. Ce n’est pas évident pour le personnel médical d’entrer en contact avec leurs patients avec ce costume anonyme et étrange.

« Lorsqu’un patient arrive dans le centre, nous ne portons jamais notre équipement complet pour l’accueillir, » explique Kathleen, une infirmière belge. « Nous n’avons que notre masque et nos gants.

Le patient peut ainsi nous voir et apprendre à nous connaître et nous pouvons nous présenter. Si le test sanguin confirme qu’il s’agit d’Ebola, nous expliquons au patient que nous allons le transférer dans une autre zone du centre. Et que nous les soignerons avec notre combinaison jaune. »

« Après trois jours, je connaissais par cœur le nom de tous mes patients, » explique Charlotte. « Appeler les patients par leur nom rend les choses plus humaines. Car cette combinaison jaune reste un obstacle physique au contact avec vos patients.

Il n’empêche que c’est terriblement frustrant pour une infirmière de ne pas pouvoir utiliser ses mains pour sentir la peau des patients qu’on soigne. Mais je ne peux pas, je dois songer à ma propre sécurité. »

« Il m’arrive parfois de vouloir m’asseoir à côté d’un patient et enlever ma tenue pour le prendre dans mes bras » explique Carlotta, une infirmière italienne.

« On a envie de lui donner un peu de chaleur humaine. Il va bientôt mourir et vous êtes le seul être humain qu’il voit. »

Photos © Peter Casaer/MSF

Douleur

Une prise en charge de qualité permet de réduire à 50 % le taux de mortalité d’Ebola. Mais 50 % – un patient sur deux admis au centre – c’est énorme, surtout lorsqu’on est habitué à sauver des vies.

Les chances de survie augmentent aussi considérablement lorsque les patients se rendent au centre dès l’apparition des premiers symptômes.

Malheureusement, c’est rarement le cas. Les patients arrivent souvent lorsqu’ils sont en phase terminale de la maladie.

Il suffit parfois d’un regard pour savoir qu’une personne ne s’en remettra pas, explique Jolien, une infirmière belge. « Un jour, 28 patients sont arrivés en même temps. Un jeune de 14 ans qui ne tenait pratiquement plus sur ses jambes et qui regardait fixement devant lui, une petite de 6 ans, complètement paniquée, qui cherchait sa maman, un femme de 30 ans, à moitié nue, très instable, dont les yeux étaient injectés de sang et la bouche saignait… Je me suis alors rappelé ce que mes collègues m’avaient dit : “au bout de quelques temps, on reconnaît les patients Ebola à leur regard.” J’ai constaté que tous mes collègues avaient le réflexe de faire quelques pas en arrière pour s’écarter de cette femme. Cette patiente ne tiendrait pas le coup longtemps, elle avait déjà son billet pour la mort. Je dis les choses crûment, mais telle est la réalité : quand 28 patients arrivent, seuls les plus solides vont s’en tirer. Nous n’aurions même pas le temps de forcer cette femme à manger et à boire. Elle était une proie facile pour la maladie. »

Les chances de survie d’un bébé de quatorze mois sont très faibles, surtout s’il n’y a personne pour veiller sur lui. »

Sarah, médecin

Tous ceux qui ont travaillé dans un centre Ebola ont en mémoire des récits tragiques de patients décédés, de décisions difficiles à prendre. Le virus n’épargne personne, pas même les plus jeunes. Le plus difficile, c’est quand un enfant meurt. Un tiers des housses mortuaires achetées par Médecins Sans Frontières pour ses centres Ebola sont destinées aux enfants.

« Je me souviens de Kumba et de sa petite-fille, qui s’appelait aussi Kumba, » raconte Sarah, médecin belge. « La petite avait déjà perdu sa mère, contaminée sans doute par Ebola. Lorsque les résultats des tests sont arrivés, nous avons dû séparer la grand-mère et sa petite-fille, car la petite était infectée et pas la grand-mère. Mais les chances de survie d’un bébé de quatorze mois sont très faibles, surtout s’il n’y a personne pour veiller sur lui. »

« Un après-midi, en pénétrant dans la zone, j’ai vu que Kumba convulsait. Elle avait retiré sa perfusion. J’ai essayé de remettre en place la perfusion, ce qui était très difficile vu les convulsions. Une infirmière est venue me prêter main forte, mais nous n’y sommes pas arrivées. En plus le risque était élevé, j’avais vraiment peur qu’on se pique.

« Alors on a décidé d’arrêter : le risque était trop élevé pour ma collègue et moi, et les chances de survie de la petite patiente infimes. Et de toute façon, nous n’avions plus qu’une heure pour soigner tous les autres patients. Je l’ai donc recouverte d’un linge et je l’ai déposée dans son lit, en prenant le maximum de précaution. Ce fut terrible pour moi de l’abandonner. Je savais qu’elle allait mourir. Et effectivement, lors de sa ronde, l’équipe qui avait pris le relais n’a pu que constater le décès de la petite. »

Ce fut terrible pour moi d’abandonner cette petite fille. Je savais qu’elle allait mourir. »

Sarah, médecin

Ce sentiment de frustration de ne pas pouvoir aider tout le monde est d’autant plus grand lorsque les gens arrivent à temps mais il n’y a simplement pas de place pour eux. Le centre d’Ebola de MSF à Monrovia au Liberia, était fin septembte 2014, encore le seul centre de toute la ville, en dépit des appels de MSF à ouvrir de toute urgence des centres additionnels. Par conséquent il y avait tellement de malades qui se présentaient au centre, que nous ne pouvions pas tous les admettre.

Pierre, anthropologue belge, s’était posté devant l’entrée de l’hôpital, pour refouler les patients.

Photos © Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos

Amitié

Dans un centre Ebola, l’une des tâches les plus difficiles est probablement la prise en charge des dépouilles. Une tâche qui revient notamment à Estifanos, un Éthiopien. « C’est en tout cas psychologiquement très pénible, » explique-t-il. « Je travaille habituellement avec des patients vivants. Et maintenant, je dois m’occuper des cadavres. Il m’arrive de devoir mettre dans une housse mortuaire le corps d’un patient qui me demandait encore de l’eau la veille. »

Confrontés à la fatigue physique et aux conséquences de l’impuissance, de la frustration et du chagrin, les collaborateurs sont très vite sur les genoux. Dans les autres projets, les gens partent en mission entre 6 et 9 mois, même dans les zones en guerre. Ce n’est pas le cas de ceux qui travaillent dans les centres Ebola : ils rentrent tous après quatre à six semaines. La fatigue fait commettre des erreurs, et chaque erreur peut avoir ici des conséquences fatales.

On vit ensemble, on travaille ensemble, on se sent très proches les uns des autres. »

Carlotta, infirmière

Hilde, médecin belge, intervient depuis 2007 lors des épidémies d’Ebola aux côtés de MSF. Elle a déjà dirigé à plusieurs reprises le volet médical de centres Ebola en Afrique de l’Ouest. « Si je pouvais, je prendrais chacun de mes collègues par la main et l’accompagnerais en permanence. C’est d’ailleurs la raison pour laquelle nous avons mis en place notre système de binômes. Mais je ne peux pas m’occuper de la formation de tout le monde. » Ce système de travail en binôme a d’autres avantages : il aide les membres de l’équipe à bien se connaître. « On se surveille mutuellement, on regarde si l’autre ne fait pas d’erreur, s’il ne se sent pas mal. Il faut faire un avec lui », explique Carlotta.

Mais les confrères et collègues ne sont pas seulement un soutien technique : ils assurent aussi l’indispensable soutien psychologique. « On ne peut pas travailler seul dans un tel contexte, » affirme Honney, infirmière philippine. « On doit vraiment pouvoir s’appuyer sur une bonne équipe, car le travail est très dur. Il faut pouvoir parler des patients, des problèmes qui se sont posés pendant la journée et de la façon dont on va les résoudre. »

« Dans une équipe, on sent qu’on fait partie d’un tout, » explique Carlotta. « L’équipe joue un rôle fondamental. On vit ensemble, on travaille ensemble, on se sent très proches les uns des autres.

Et quand ça ne va pas fort, on sait qu’il y aura toujours quelqu’un pour nous aider. Certains jours, on se sent au bout du rouleau, car les événements pénibles se sont accumulés. Lors de ces journées difficiles, ce sont vos collègues qui vous aident à tenir le coup. »

Nous ne pouvons pas nous prendre dans les bras sauf quand on a revêtu l’équipement de protection. » Véronique, infirmière

Mais ce soutien ne peut s’exprimer que par des mots. Car pour limiter au maximum le risque de contamination, nous ne pouvons jamais nous toucher. Ce qui n’est pas facile quand on aimerait tant prendre dans ses bras un collègue qui est à bout. « C’est très dur pour moi », explique Véronique, infirmière canadienne. « Habituellement, on se touche et on s’embrasse beaucoup. Et tout d’un coup, ces gestes sont interdits à cause du risque de contamination. Mais entendons-nous : c’est pour notre propre sécurité et celle de nos collègues.

Il nous arrive parfois de nous étreindre : juste avant d’entrer dans la zone à haut risque, quand on a revêtu l’équipement de protection. On peut alors se prendre un instant dans les bras. » Mais un bref instant, car une telle tenue ne peut être portée que peu de temps.

« Et ces gestes, on ne les fait qu’avant d’entrer, jamais à l’intérieur, jamais après, » poursuit Véronique.

Photos © Caroline Van Nespen/MSF, Sylvain. Cherkaoui/Cosmos, Peter Casaer/MSF.

Cuba sent early on more Health workers to Ebola afflicted West Africa than the USA did

What Guatemala, Pakistan, Indonesia, Haiti share?

These 4 different nations suffered calamities in the past decade: they were all struck by natural disasters which overwhelmed their under-staffed and under-funded public health systems.

Into the rubble, flooding, and chaos of these distinct cultures and contexts, Cuba dispatched a specialized disaster and epidemic control team to support local health providers.

It was a story of unprecedented medical solidarity by a developing country which few media outlets picked up – until now.

Conner Gorry in Havana posted in the Guardian Professional, Thursday 23 October 2014

Raul Castro and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro at the summit on Ebola in Havana
What can the governments of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia learn from Raul Castro’s health policies? Photograph: Xinhua/Landov/Barcroft Media

The Henry Reeve Brigade, as it’s known, was established in 2005 by more than 1,500 Cuban health professionals trained in disaster medicine and infectious disease containment; built on 40 years of medical aid experience, the volunteer team was outfitted with essential medicines and equipment and prepared to deploy to US regions ravaged by Hurricane Katrina (the offer was rejected by the Bush administration). Today, Cuba’s Henry Reeve Brigade is the largest medical team on the ground in west Africa battling Ebola.

The small island nation has pledged 461 doctors and nurses to provide care in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, the largest single-country offer of healthcare workers to date.

While United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon decried the pallid aid commitment from around the globe calling for “a 20-fold resource mobilisation and at least a 20-fold surge in assistance” Cuba already had 165 of these specially-trained healthcare workers on the ground in Sierra Leone.

Each of these volunteers, chosen from a pool of 15,000 candidates who stepped forward to serve in west Africa, has extensive disaster response experience.

Preparation for this mission required additional, rigorous training at Havana’s Pedro Kourí Institute of Tropical Medicine with biosecurity experts from the United States and the Pan American Health Organisation.

This rapid mobilisation of sorely-needed health professionals begs the question: how can a poor developing country spare qualified, experienced doctors and nurses?

By pursuing a robust medical education strategy, coupled with a preventive, community-based approach, Cuba, a country of just 11.2 million inhabitants, has achieved a health picture on par with the world’s most developed nations.

This didn’t happen overnight. Rather, Cuba’s admirable health report card results from decades of honing a strategy designed specifically for a resource-scarce setting.

By locating primary care doctors in neighbourhoods and emphasising disease prevention, the health system – which is universal and free at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels – makes care accessible and keeps people as healthy as possible, as long as possible, saving resources for more expensive treatments and interventions in the process.

But prevention and health promotion by community-based healthcare workers are only part of the story. Cuba’s policies and practices, both at home and abroad (currently more than 50,000 Cuban health professionals are serving in 66 countries) are built on several principles proven effective in resource-scarce settings.

First, coordinating health policies at the local, regional, and national levels is essential; this is particularly important where infectious diseases are concerned since uniform protocols are integral to containment.

Next, health initiatives must be cross-sectoral and based on integrated messages and actions. A fragmented, uncoordinated response by and among different agencies can prove dangerous and even deadly.

This was tragically illustrated by the death of Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas and the US Centers for Disease Control allowing a nurse who has Ebola to travel on a commercial flight.

Finally, infectious disease outbreaks must be addressed quickly – easier said than done in poor settings, where public health systems are already strained or collapsing already.

The Ebola outbreak snaps the need for Cuba’s approach into sharp relief: only a coordinated response, provided by well-trained and – equipped primary healthcare professionals will contain this – and future – epidemics.

Indeed, policymakers such as World Health Organisation’s Margaret Chan and US secretary of state John Kerry have lauded the Cuban response, underscoring the importance of collaboration as the only solution to this global health crisis.

Forging this solution, however, requires harnessing the political will across borders and agencies to marshal resources and know-how. Havana took up the challenge by hosting a special Summit on Ebola with its regional partners and global health authorities on 20 October.

Noticeably absent were US health representatives; if we’re to construct a comprehensive, integrated, and effective global response, all resources and experiences must be coordinated and brought to bear, regardless of political differences. Anything less and Ebola wins.

Conner Gorry is senior editor of Medicc Review. Follow @ConnerGo on Twitter.

Ebola vs People

Ricken Patel –

10:58 PM (14 hours ago)

 
Ebola could threaten us all, and the most urgent need to stop it is for volunteers.

If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone. Other volunteers – in health, sanitation, logistics – can help too. This is a call to serve humanity in the deepest possible way, to accept serious risk for our fellow human beings.

Click to learn more, and show our gratitude to those making this powerful choice:

TAKE ACTION NOW

Three weeks ago, hundreds of thousands of us went offline to fight climate change. This week, we’re going offline to help stop Ebola.

The Ebola virus is spiraling out of control. Cases in West Africa are doubling every 2-3 weeks and the latest estimate says that up to 1.4 million people could be infected by mid-January.

Talking about exponential growth is frightening

At that scale, this monster threatens the entire world.

I just read that the UN has only $100,000 in its fund for the Ebola outbreak

Mind you that AIDS harvest over 1.5 million each year (as much as Malaria and Dysentery combined).

Though, malaria is the number one disease followed by dysentery that put heavy burden on the States in Africa and Equatorial countries.

Ricken Patel – Avaaz posted this Oct 18, 2014

Previous Ebola outbreaks have been repeatedly contained at small numbers. But the scale of this epidemic has swamped the region’s weak health systems.

Liberia has less than 1 doctor for every 100,000 people. Governments are providing funds, but there just aren’t enough medical staff to stem the epidemic.

That’s where we come in.

39 million people are receiving this email. Our polling shows that 6% of us are health workers – doctors or nurses – that’s nearly 2 million of us.

If just 120 doctors among us volunteer, it will *double* the number of doctors in Sierra Leone.

Other volunteers can help too — lab technicians, logisticians, water and sanitation workers, and transport workers. Volunteering means more than time. It means risk.

Health professionals have already died fighting Ebola. But if there’s any group of people that would consider taking this risk for their fellow human beings, it’s our community. I and others on the Avaaz team are ready to take that risk with you, traveling to the front lines of this crisis.

Great things come from listening to the deepest voices within us.

If you’re a health professional, or have other skills that can help, I ask you to take a moment, listen to the part of you that you most trust, and follow it.

Click below to volunteer, see messages from volunteers about why they’ve made this choice, and leave your own message of appreciation and encouragement for them:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/ebola_volunteers_thank_you_3/?bFAfecb&v=47569

Raising your hand to volunteer is the first step. You’ll need to get, and provide, a lot of information to ensure you’re well matched to an available position. You will likely need to discuss this decision with your loved ones, and you can withdraw from the process later if you choose to. For this effort, Avaaz is working with Partners In Health, Save the Children, and International Medical Corps, three of the leading organisations fighting this deadly disease. We are also consulting with the governments of Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, and the World Health Organization.

While there is substantial risk, there are also clear ways to contain that risk. 

Ebola is spread through bodily fluids, so with extreme care, the risk of contracting it can be minimized.

So far, 94 health care workers have died of Ebola in Liberia, but almost all of them have been national health workers, who sadly are far less well equipped than international volunteers. 

With treatment, the chances of surviving the virus are better than 50%.

Many of us, from police to activists to soldiers, have jobs that involve risking our lives for our country. It’s the most powerful statement we can make about what’s worth living for. Taking this risk to fight Ebola, makes a statement that our fellow human beings, wherever they are, are worth living for:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/ebola_volunteers_thank_you_3/?bFAfecb&v=47569

If Ebola spirals further out of control, it could soon threaten us all. The fact that a weak health care system in a small country can let this monster grow to a size that threatens the world is a powerful statement of just how interdependent we are. But this interdependence is far more than just interests.

We are connected, all of us, in a community of human beings.

All the lies that have divided us – about nation and religion and sexuality – are being torn down, and we are realizing that we really are one people, one tribe. 

That a young mother and her daughter in Liberia fear the same things and love the same things as a young mother and her daughter in Brazil, or the Netherlands. And in this unfolding understanding, a new world is being born. Out of the darkest places come our brightest lights. Out of the depths of the Ebola nightmare, let’s bring the hope of a new world of one people, willing to give, and sacrifice, for each other.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, John, Alice, Danny, and the whole Avaaz team.

More information:

Up to 1.4m people could be infected with Ebola by January, CDC warns (The Guardian)
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/sep/23/ebola-cdc-millions-infected-quarantine-africa-epidemi…

Known Cases and Outbreaks of Ebola Virus Disease, in Chronological Order (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/history/chronology.html

Ebola ‘devouring everything in its path’ (Al Jazeera)
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2014/09/ebola-devouring-everything-path-201499161646914388.html

Ebola death rates 70% – WHO study (BBC)
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29327741

Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola (WHO)
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/ebola/25-august-2014/en/

How living organisms were created?

From “A short history of nearly everything” by Bill Bryson

When it was created, Earth had no oxygen in its environment.

Cyanobacteria or algae break down water by absorbing the hydrogen and release the oxygen waste,which is actually a very toxic element to every anaerobic organism.

Our white blood cells actually use oxygen to kill invading bacteria.  This process of releasing oxygen is called photosynthesis, undoubtedly the most important single metabolic innovation in the history of life on the planet.

It took two billion years for our environment to accumulate 20% of oxygen, since oxygen was absorbed to oxidize every conceivable mineral on Earth, rust the mineral, and sink it in the bottom of oceans.

Life started when special bacteria used oxygen to summon up enough energy to work and photosynthesize.

Mitochondria, tiny organism, manipulates oxygen in a way that liberates energy from foodstuffs . They are very hungry organisms that a billion of them are packed in a grain of sand.

Mitochondria maintain their own DNA, RNA, and ribosome and behave as if they think things might not work out between us.

They look like bacteria, divide like bacteria and sometimes respond to antibiotics in the same way bacteria do; they live in cells but do not speak the same genetic language.

The truly nucleated cells are called eukaryotes and we ended up with two kinds of them: those that expel oxygen, like plants, and those that take in oxygen, like us.

Single-celled eukaryote contains 400 million bits of genetic information in its DNA, enough to fill 80 books of 500 pages.  It took a billion years for eukaryotes to learn to assemble into complex multi-cellular beings.

Microbes or bacteria form an intrinsic unit with our body and our survival.  They are in the trillions, grazing on our fleshy plains and breaking down our foodstuff and our waste into useful elements for our survival.

They synthesize vitamins in our guts, convert food into sugar and polysaccharides and go to war on alien microbes; they pluck nitrogen from the air and convert it into useful nucleotides and amino acids for us, a process that is extremely difficult to manufacture industrially.

Microbes continue to regenerate the air that we breathe with oxygen.  Microbes are very prolific and can split and generate 280 billion offspring within a day.

In every million divisions, a microbe may produce a mutant with a slight characteristic that can resist antibodies.

The most troubling is that microbes are endowed with the ability to evolve rapidly and acquire the genes of the mutants and become a single invincible super-organism; any adaptive change that occurs in one area of the bacterial province can spread to any other.

Microbes are generally harmless unless, by accident, they move from a specialized location in the body to another location such as the blood stream, for example, or are attacked by viruses, or our white blood cells go on a rampage.

Microbes can live almost anywhere; some were found in nuclear power generators feeding on uranium, some in the deep seas, some in sulfuric environment, some in extreme climate, and some can survive in enclosed bottles for hundred of years, as long as there is anything to feed on.

Viruses or phages can infect bacteria. A virus are not alive, they are nucleic acid, inert and harmless in isolation and visible by the electron microscope. Viruses barely have ten genes; even the smallest bacteria require several thousand genes..  But introduce them into a suitable host and they burst into life.

Viruses prosper by hijacking the genetic material of a living cell and reproduce in a fanatical manner.  About 5,000 types of virus are known and they afflict us with the flu, smallpox, rabies, yellow fever, Ebola, polio and AIDS.

Viruses burst upon the world in some new and startling form and then vanish as quickly as they came after killing millions of individuals in a short period.

There are billions of species. Tropical rainforests that represent only 6% of the Earth surface harbor more than half of its animal life and two third of its flowering plants.

A quarter of all prescribed medicines are derived from just 40 plants and 16% coming from microbes.

The discovery of new flowery plants might provide humanity with chemical compounds that have passed the “ultimate screening program” over billions of years of evolution.

The tenth of the weight of a six year-old pillow is made up of mites, living or dead, and mite dung; washing at low temperature just get the lice cleaner!

“A short history of nearly everything” by Bill Bryson, (part 2)

How living organisms were created?

 Earth had no oxygen in its environment when it was created.  Cyanobacteria or algae break down water by absorbing the hydrogen and released the oxygen waste which is actually a very toxic element to every anaerobic organism; our white blood cells actually use oxygen to kill invading bacteria.  This process of releasing oxygen is called photosynthesis, undoubtedly the most important single metabolic innovation in the history of life on the planet. 

It took two billion years for our environment to accumulate 20% of oxygen because oxygen was absorbed to oxidize every conceivable mineral on Earth and rust it and sink it in the bottom of oceans. 

Life started when special bacteria used oxygen to summon up enough energy to work and photosynthesize. Mitochondria manipulate oxygen in a way that liberates energy from foodstuffs and they are very hungry tiny organisms that a billion of them are packed in a grain of sand.  Mitochondria maintain their own DNA, RNA and ribosome and behave as if they think things might not work out between us.  They look like bacteria, divide like bacteria and sometimes respond to antibiotics in the same way bacteria do; they live in cells but do not speak the same genetic language.  

The truly nucleated cells are called eukaryotes and we ended up with two kinds of them: those that expel oxygen, like plants, and those that take in oxygen, like us.  Single-celled eukaryote contains 400 million bits of genetic information in its DNA, enough to fill 80 books of 500 pages.  It took a billion years for eukaryotes to learn to assemble into complex multi-cellular beings.

Microbes or bacteria form an intrinsic unit with our body and our survival.  They are in the trillions grazing on our fleshy plains and breaking down our foodstuff and our waste into useful elements for our survival; they synthesize vitamins in our guts, convert food into sugar and polysaccharides and go to war on alien microbes; they pluck nitrogen from the air and convert it into useful nucleotides and amino acids for us, a process that is extremely difficult to manufacture industrially. 

Microbes continue to regenerate the air that we breathe with oxygen.  Microbes are very prolific and can split and generate 280 billion offspring within a day; once every million divisions they produce a mutant with a slight characteristic that can resist antibodies.  The most troubling is that microbes are endowed with the ability to evolve rapidly and acquire the genes of the mutants and become a single invincible super-organism; any adaptive change that occurs in one area of the bacterial province can spread to any other. 

Microbes are generally harmless unless, by accident, they move from a specialized location in the body to another location such as the blood stream, for example, or are attacked by viruses, or our white blood cells go on a rampage.  Microbes can live almost anywhere; some were found in nuclear power generators feeding on uranium, some in the deep seas, some in sulfuric environment, some in extreme climate, and some can survive in enclosed bottles for hundred of years as long as there is anything to feed on.

Viruses or phages can infect bacteria. A virus are not alive, they are nucleic acid, inert and harmless in isolation and visible by the electron microscope; it barely have ten genes; even the smallest bacteria require several thousand genes..  But introduce them into a suitable host and they burst into life.

Viruses prosper by hijacking the genetic material of a living cell and reproduce in a fanatical manner.  About 5,000 types of virus are known and they afflict us with the flu, smallpox, rabies, yellow fever, Ebola, polio and AIDS.  Viruses burst upon the world in some new and startling form and then vanish as quickly as they came after killing millions of individuals in a short period.

There are billions of species and tropical rainforests that represent only 6% of the Earth surface harbor more than half of its animal life and two third of its flowering plants. A quarter of all prescribed medicines are derived from just 40 plants and 16% coming from microbes.  The discovery of new flowery plants might provide humanity with chemical compounds that have passed the “ultimate screening program” over billions of years of evolution.

The tenth of the weight of a six years pillow is made up of mites, living or dead, and mite dung; low temperature washing just get the lice cleaner!

 Water is everywhere. A potato is 80% water, a cow 74%, a bacterium 75%, a tomato at 95%, and human 65%.  Most liquid when chilled contract 10% but water only 1%, but just before freezing it expands.  When solid water is 10% more voluminous, an utterly bizarre property which allow ice to float, otherwise ice would sink and oceans would freeze from the bottom. 

Without surface ice to hold heat in, the water warmth would radiate away and thus creating more ice and soon oceans would freeze.  Water is defying the rules of chemistry and law of physics.  The hydrogen atoms cling fiercely to their oxygen host, but also make casual bonds with other water molecules, thus changing partners billions of times a second and thus, water molecules stick together and can be siphoned without breaking but not so tightly so that you may dive into a pool.  Surface water molecules are attracted more powerfully to the like molecule beneath and beside them than to the air molecule above so that it creates a sort of membrane that supports insects.

All but the smallest fraction of the water on Earth is poisonous to us because of the salts within it.  Uncannily, the proportions of the various salts in our body are similar to those in sea water; we cry sea water, and we sweat sea water but we cannot tolerate sea water as an input! Salt in the body provoke a crisis because from every cell, water molecules rush off to dilute and carry off the sudden intake of salt.  The oceans have achieved their present volume of 1.3 billion cubic kilometer of water and it is a closed system. 

The Pacific holds 52% of the 97% of all the water on Earth.  The remaining 3% of fresh water exist as ice sheet; Antarctica holds 90% of the planet’s ice, standing on over 2 miles of ice.  If Antarctica is to completely melt the ocean would rise about 70 meters.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

August 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Blog Stats

  • 1,405,579 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 756 other followers

%d bloggers like this: