Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Eduardo Galeano

Daydream project? Restructuring medical profession and health care providers

Daydream project: Restructuring medical  profession and health care providers systems

My daydreaming started by recollecting that nurses are the ones who took care of me, smiled to me, and had compassion to my predicament after each surgery: Surgeons spent less than a minute after their job was done, if they ever found it necessary or had time to visit their patients.

The entire health care system is fundamentally run by nurses, carried on the shoulders of nurses…

For example, Philippinas  (from the Philippine) in the US constitute the vast majority of nurses (at least a decade ago).

Eduardo Galeano wrote this story:

“It is 1984, in the prison of Lurigancho at Lima (Chili).  Luis Nino is inspecting the prison for the count of a human rights organization.  Luis is crossing sick prisoners, vomiting blood, agonizing, open wounds, with fever…

Luis meets the chief medical staff and ask why the physicians are not making any routine health rounds…The physician replies: “We, physicians, intervene at the calls of nurses…”

And where are the nurses? The chief retorts: “The budget for the prison didn’t allocate funds for nurses…”

I got into thinking:

“If I ever come into big money, or get in a position of power, I will take care of the nurses, improve their standard of living,  extend material values and dignity to their hard work, get engaged with Occupy Health Care protests

I will rent buildings close to hospitals and rent affordable rooms to nurses, and let the nurses run the building…

And install a modern facility in the building for continuing education and provide vans and affordable transport system for the nurses who can barely make ends meet…”

My daydreaming ideas went wild and I got into thinking:

“The entire medical system and health care providers need restructuring in order for nurses to receive their fair share in the gratitude of patients and return on the huge profit and…”

I saved the post as a draft, with the intention to publish it as my daydreaming project is complete, and then I said: “This project is hardly ever going to be complete. Publish whatever you have and let readers be inspired and finish it for you…”

The project is not meant to abolish current health institutions, medical schools and health services, but to establish an alternative system, funded by States until the new alternative institutions start generating followers and fund-raisers and…

The idea is that students in all medical fields (nurse, dietetics, massage provider, biologist, veterinarian, dentist, Red Cross volunteer, hospital administration, hospital manager, pharmacist, psychologist, psychiatrist, medical students, Ergonomics designers, medical equipment designers and operators…) share nursing practices in the first couple of years, get paid from year one, and are of practical service to the communities, particularly in rural areas, poorer districts, and in time of catastrophic events.

The University program and curriculum are reviewed so that practical initiations with patients and health institutions are offered in tandem with theoretical and general knowledge are focused on.

All students enrolled in one of the medical fields mentioned above have to learn and work as nurses for the first two years, and earn their living.

Year One:

Medical students, in all fields mentioned above, work in hospital and learn to deliver first aides services (like Red Cross volunteer courses), how to communicate with patients, get initiated with hospital administration and procedures…

Practical initiation: trauma cases, drug cases, vaccination procedures, types of contagious diseases, curable diseases

Formal courses: Physiology, musculoskeletal disorders, introduction to Human Factors issues, health and safety in hospital and workplaces, experimental design, statistical analysis…

Year Two:

Medical students learn to be exposed to surgery room practices and procedures, anesthesiology room, pharmacy section, and hospital administration…

Practical initiation: blood testing procedures, urine testing procedures, tropical diseases diagnostics, injection, administering medication,

Formal courses in Anatomy, designing surveys and collecting data, analysing and interpreting peer-reviewed scientific research and sorting out valid experiments, introduction to pharmacology,…

Year Three:

Students targeting fields in (medical equipment design and operation, hospital management and administration, dietetics, massage provider, biologist, and psychology) part from the other students into specialized universities and sections.

The remaining students get skills in small skin surgery, dialysis procedures, intensive care units, hard to cure diseases…

Formal course in neurology, in-depth reading of peer-review scientific research articles, designing and performing controlled experiments,…

Year Four:

The students in the medical fields part ways.

Except for the general physician practitioners, dentists, pharmacists, psychoanalysts, the other students should be ready to graduate in their preferred subject of interest.

At worse, a couple of courses might be needed to achieve their requirements.

Rationales for this alternative system:

1. The “psychological” divide between physicians and nurses is “physically and mentally” reduced

2. Physicians will be readier to empathize with patients

3. Physicians will be initiated with the “physical understanding” of the job of nurses, and will feel readier to support nurses demands and syndicates for continuing education and resume the study to becoming full-fledged physicians…

4. Communities will enjoy a much larger pool of health providers in the events of catastrophes, war, economic downturn…

5. Earning a living from year one and feeling confident as a valued citizen

6. Efficient interactions and interrelations among health institutions

7. Nurses playing vaster roles as communicators and transmitters links among patients and specialized physicians, particularly for remote patients, neglected patients in residences, uncovered patients with any health insurance…

8.  How about you forward me with all your rationales, suggestions, and developed comments?

Note: It is becoming evident that modern schooling system is principally a big detention center for the youth in order to keep them “away from the streets”.

Kids do Not need 13 years of formal schooling before going to universities or learning practical skills and talents to earn a living by the age of 15. It is not knowledge that they are learning, but regurgitation of consensus information.

Reflective learning and self-learning are not appreciated on the ground that kids are not “ready to discuss, ponder and ask the right questions…”

Kids have to earn a living from skilled maintenance professions before considering higher education in fields of their interests…

In general, in almost every society, you have about 15% of the population deemed unnecessary for producing and contributing to the development of the” system”: They are confined in ghetto quarters to fend for their survival and are basically the ones incarcerated in order to show “statistically” that the police force is doing its job…

Edwardo Galeano: Apartheid Israel slowly but surely swallowed Palestine

Note: Yesterday, Dec. 23, 2016, the UN issued a resolution summoning Israel to desist from further settlements in the West Bank.

Israel vowed to empty this resolution from any effects. Like practically killing the spirit of UN resolution 198 of 1948 declaring the Right of Return for Palestinians to their homeland.

Edwardo Galeano posted « Peu de Palestine reste. Pas à pas, Israël l’efface de la carte »

Pour se justifier, le terrorisme de l’État fabrique des terroristes : il sème de la haine et récolte des alibis.

Tout indique que cette boucherie de Gaza, qui selon ses auteurs veut en finir avec les terroristes, réussira à les multiplier.

Depuis 1948, les palestiniens vivent condamnés à l’humiliation perpétuelle. Ils ne peuvent même respirer sans permission.

Ils ont perdu leur patrie, leurs terres, leur eau, leur liberté, leur tout.

Ils n’ont même pas le droit de choisir leurs gouvernants. Quand ils votent pour celui pour lequel ils ne doivent pas voter, ils sont punis. Gaza est punie.

C’est devenu une souricière sans sortie, depuis que le Hamas a proprement gagné les élections en 2006. Quelque chose de semblable était arrivée en 1932, quand le Parti Communiste a triomphé aux élections d’El Salvador. (The USA fomented a military coup)

Baignés dans le sang, les habitants du Salvador ont expié leur mauvaise conduite et depuis ce temps-là ont vécu soumis à des dictatures militaires. La démocratie est un luxe que tous ne méritent pas .

Enfants de l’impuissance sont les roquettes « maison » que les militants du Hamas, parqués à Gaza, lancent maladroitement sur les terres qui avaient été palestiniennes et que l’occupation israélienne a usurpées.

Et le désespoir, au bord de la folie suicidaire est la mère des bravades qui nient le droit à l’existence d’Israël, des cris sans aucune efficacité, tandis que la guerre très efficace d’extermination nie, depuis des années, le droit à l’existence de la Palestine.

Peu reste de la Palestine. Pas à pas, Israël l’efface de la carte.

Les colons envahissent, et après eux les soldats corrigent la frontière. Les balles sacralisent la spoliation, en légitime défense. Il n’y a pas de guerre agressive qui ne dit pas être une guerre défensive.

Hitler a envahi la Pologne pour éviter que la Pologne envahisse l’Allemagne. (Funny)

Bush a envahi l’Irak pour éviter que l’Irak envahisse le monde.

Dans chacune de ses guerres défensives, Israël a avalé un autre morceau de la Palestine, et les déjeuners suivent. La dévoration se justifie par les titres de la propriété que la Bible a octroyée, par les deux mille ans de persécution dont le peuple juif a souffert, et par la panique que les palestiniens génèrent au guet.

Israël est le pays qui ne tient jamais les recommandations ni les résolutions des Nations Unies, celui qui ne respecte jamais les sentences des tribunaux internationaux, celui qui se moque des lois internationales, et est aussi l’unique pays qui a légalisé la torture de prisonniers.

(Every day, Israel detains administratively a dozen Palestinian youth under a British law of 1036)

Qui lui a offert le droit de nier tous les droits ? D’où vient l’impunité avec laquelle Israël exécute le massacre de Gaza ? Le gouvernement espagnol n’aurait pas pu impunément bombarder le Pays Basque pour en finir avec l’ETA, ni le gouvernement britannique aurait pu raser l’Irlande pour liquider l’IRA. Est-ce que la tragédie de l’Holocauste implique une assurance d’impunité éternelle ?

Ou ce feu vert provient-il de la puissance, le grand manitou qui a en Israël le plus inconditionnel de ses vassaux ? L’armée israélienne, la plus moderne et sophistiquée du monde, sait qui elle tue.

Elle ne tue pas par erreur. Elle tue par horreur. Les victimes civiles s’appellent dommages collatéraux, selon le dictionnaire d’autres guerres impériales.

A Gaza, sur chaque dix dommages collatéraux, trois sont enfants.

Et s’ajoutent par milliers, les mutilés, les victimes de la technologie de l’écartèlement humain que l’industrie militaire essaie avec réussite dans cette opération de purification ethnique. Et comme toujours, toujours la même chose : à Gaza, cent pour un. Par chaque cent palestiniens morts, un Israélien.

Des gens dangereux, avertit l’autre bombardement, pour le compte des médias de masse de manipulation, qui nous invitent à croire qu’une vie israélienne vaut autant que cent vies palestiniennes. Et ces médias nous invitent à croire aussi que sont humanitaires les deux cents bombes atomiques d’Israël, et qu’une puissance nucléaire appelée Iran a été celle qui a anéanti Hiroshima et Nagasaki.

La soi-disant communauté internationale : existe-t-elle ? Est-elle quelque chose de plus qu’un club de marchands, de banquiers et de guerriers ?

Est-elle quelque chose de plus que le nom scène que prennent les États-Unis quand ils font du théâtre ? Devant la tragédie de Gaza, l’hypocrisie mondiale brille encore une fois.

Comme toujours, l’indifférence, les discours vides, les déclarations creuses, les déclamations ronflantes, les postures ambiguës, rendent un tribut à l’impunité sacrée. Devant la tragédie de la Gaza, les pays arabes se lavent les mains. Comme toujours. Et comme toujours, les pays européens se frottent les mains.

La vieille Europe, si capable de beauté et de perversité, répand quelque larme tandis qu’elle célèbre secrètement ce coup de maître. Parce que la partie de chasse aux Juifs a toujours été une coutume européenne, mais depuis un demi-siècle cette dette historique est demandée aux palestiniens, qui sont aussi sémites et qui n’ont jamais été, ni ne sont, antisémites.

Ils paient, par le sang comptant et trébuchant, un compte des autres. (Cet article est consacré à mes amis juifs assassinés par les dictatures latino-américaines qu’Israël avaient conseillées).

Eduardo Galeano

Caracas, le 26 novembre 2012 – Aporrea.org

 

 

They passed away: Uruguay writer Eduardo Galeano and Gunter Grass (Nobel prize for literature in 2009

Uruguayan writer and journalist Eduardo Galeano, author of “Las venas abiertas de América Latina”, among other masterpieces, died today, aged 74, in Montevideo, where he lived.

His best-known works are “Las venas abiertas de América Latina” (Open Veins of Latin America, 1971) and “Memoria del fuego” (Memory of Fire Trilogy, 1982–86), which have both been translated into 20 languages and transcend orthodox genres, combining journalism, political analysis, and history.

The author himself has proclaimed his obsession as a writer saying, “I’m a writer obsessed with remembering, with remembering the past of America and above all that of Latin America, intimate land condemned to amnesia.”

 posted in July 23, 2013:

Most mornings it’s the same. At the breakfast table Uruguayan-born author, Eduardo Galeano, 72, and his wife, Helena Villagra, discuss their dreams from the night before.

“Mine are always stupid,” says Galeano. “Usually I don’t remember them and when I do, they are about silly things like missing planes and bureaucratic troubles. But my wife has these beautiful dreams.”

“There is a tradition that sees journalism as the dark side of literature, with book writing at its zenith,” he told the Spanish newspaper El Pais recently.

“I don’t agree. I think that all written work constitutes literature, even graffiti. I have been writing books for many years now, but I trained as a journalist, and the stamp is still on me. I am grateful to journalism for waking me up to the realities of the world.”

Those realities appear bleak.

“This world is not democratic at all,” he says. “The most powerful institutions, the IMF [International Monetary Fund] and the World Bank, belong to three or four countries. The others are watching. The world is organised by the war economy and the war culture.”

And yet there is nothing in either Galeano’s work or his demeanour that smacks of despair or even melancholy.

While in Spain during the youth uprisings of the indignados two years ago, he met some young protesters at Madrid’s Puerta del Sol. Galeano took heart from the demonstrations.

“These were young people who believed in what they were doing,” he said. “It’s not easy to find that in political fields. I’m really grateful for them.”

One of them asked him how long he thought their struggle could continue. “Don’t worry,” Galeano replied. “It’s like making love. It’s infinite while it’s alive. It doesn’t matter if it lasts for one minute. Because in the moment it is happening, one minute can feel like more than one year.”

Galeano talks like this a lot – not in riddles but enigmatically and playfully, using time as his foil.

When I ask him whether he is optimistic about the state of the world, he says: “It depends on when you ask me during the day. From 8am until noon I am pessimistic. Then from 1pm until 4 I feel optimistic.” I met him in a hotel lobby in downtown Chicago at 5pm, sitting with a large glass of wine, looking quite happy.

His world view is not complicated – military and economic interests are destroying the world, amassing increasing power in the hands of the wealthy and crushing the poor.

Given the broad historical sweep of his work, examples from the 15th century and beyond are not uncommon.

He understands the present situation not as a new development, but a continuum on a planet permanently plagued by conquest and resistance. “History never really says goodbye,” he says. “History says, see you later.”

He is anything but simplistic.

A strident critic of Obama’s foreign policy who lived in exile from Uruguay for over a decade during the 70s and 80s, he nonetheless enjoyed the symbolic resonance of Obama’s election with few illusions.

“I was very happy when he was elected, because this is a country with a fresh tradition of racism.”

He tells the story of how the Pentagon in 1942 ordered that no black people’s blood be used for transfusions for whites. “In history that is nothing. 70 years is like a minute. So in such a country Obama’s victory was worth celebrating.”

All of these qualities – the enigmatic, the playful, the historical and the realist – blend in his latest book, Children of the Days, in which he crafts a historical vignette for each day of the year. (That’s exactly what Grass did for each year in the 20thcentury)

The aim is to reveal moments from the past while contextualising them in the present, weaving in and out of centuries to illustrate the continuities.

What he achieves is a kind of epigrammatic excavation, uprooting stories that have been mislaid or misappropriated, and presenting them in their full glory, horror or absurdity.

His entry for 1 July, for example, is entitled: One Terrorist Fewer. It reads simply.

“In the year 2008, the government of the United States decided to erase Nelson Mandela’s name from its list of dangerous terrorists. The most revered African in the world had featured on that sinister roll for 60 years.” He named 12 October Discovery, and starts with the line: “In 1492 the natives discovered they were Indians, they discovered they lived in America.”

Meanwhile 10 December is called Blessed War and is dedicated to Obama’s receipt of the Nobel prize, when Obama said there are “times when nations will find the use of force not only necessary, but morally justified.”

Galeano writes: “Four and a half centuries before, when the Nobel prize did not exist and evil resided in countries not with oil but with gold and silver, Spanish jurist Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda also defended war as ‘not only necessary but morally justified’.”

And so he flits from past to present and back again, making connections with a wry and scathing wit.

His desire is to refurbish what he calls the “human rainbow. It is much more beautiful than the rainbow in the sky,” he insists. “But our militarism, machismo, racism all blinds us to it. There are so many ways of becoming blind. We are blind to small things and small people.”

And the most likely route to becoming blind, he believes, is not losing our sight but our memory.

My great fear is that we are all suffering from amnesia. I wrote to recover the memory of the human rainbow, which is in danger of being mutilated.”

By way of example he cites Robert Carter III – of whom I had not heard – who was the only one of the US’s founding fathers to free his slaves. “For having committed this unforgivable sin he was condemned to historical oblivion.”

Who, I ask, is responsible for this forgetfulness? “It’s not a person,” he explains. “It’s a system of power that is always deciding in the name of humanity who deserves to be remembered and who deserves to be forgotten … We are much more than we are told. We are much more beautiful.”

Note 1: A post I published on Galeano.

https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2011/12/09/voices-of-the-time-in-very-short-stories-by-eduardo-galeano/

Andrew Bossone shared this link on FB

To quote Oscar Guardiola-Rivera: veins are still open

Voices of the time: In very short stories by Eduardo Galeano

1) It is in a course of intensive care, at a Buenos Aires hospital, that Ruben Omar Sosa studied the case of the patient Maximiliana. This case would be the most important lesson that Ruben learned in his medical career.

Every day, and at every encounter with Ruben, Maximiliana would ask him to take her pulse.  Ruben would hold Maximiliana wrist for a couple of seconds, just faking of taking her pulse, and say: “Your pulse is 78. Excellent”   Maximiliana would instantly forget that Ruben has taken her pulse and repeat the demand, and Ruben would oblige.  Ruben got convinced that Maximiliana is a mental case.

It was years later that it dawned on Ruben that Maximiliana wanted someone to touch her.

2) Trees of golden fruits.  Black hands collect the white grains in large green leaves.  The grains are spread in the sun to ferment and acquire the color of copper.

The cocoa grains are dispatched to European and US factories for treatment.  Cadbury, Mars, Nestle, Hershey…sell the chocolate bars to supermarkets around the world.  For every dollar of chocolate sold, less than 4 cents are paid to African villages that little hands gathered the cocoa, grain by grain.

I was covering Ghana as correspondent to a European daily and I visited one of the cocoa plantations.  I was eating a chocolate bar and the kids were curious how it tasted.

They loved chocolate: It never crossed their mind that they were in the chocolate business.  They have never tasted chocolate.

3) Muhammad Ashraf never set foot in school. Up before dawn, he has been working since the age of 6.  Muhammad is 11 year-old, cutting, perforating, patching, and sewing soccer balls.

Soccer balls are produced in the Pakistani village of Umarkot and seen in every soccer field around the world.  Muhammad also has to glue a sticker that read “This soccer ball was not made by kids

4) It is 1984 in the prison of Lurigancho at Lima (Chili).  Luis Nino is inspecting the prison for the count of a human rights organization.  Luis is crossing sick prisoners, vomiting blood, agonizing, open wounds, with fever…Luis meets the chief medical staff and ask why the physicians are not making any routine health rounds…

The physician replies: “We, physicians, intervene at the calls of nurses…”  And where are the nurses? The chief retorts: “The budget for the prison didn’t allocate funds for nurses…”

5) It is 1964.  US capitalism propaganda are frightening the citizens of Chili of the Communist hydra, its seven mouths ready to devour them.  Salvador Allende lost the election that year and explained: “In the poor quarter of Providencia, a maid hid a suitcase of her cloths and utensils in the garden of her employer. She had never owned any land or houses, and her comprehension of private properties was very limited”

6) A few months after 9/11 attack on twin Towers, Ariel Sharon PM of Israel entered the Palestinian refugee camp of Jennine in the West Bank (under Israel occupation forces) that crowded ten of thousands of civilians. Israel pounded the cordoned-off camp with canons, and tanks overran live bodies.

This genocide opened a crater in the camp deeper and larger than Twin Towers, and killed many folds the number of victims in Twin Towers.  The Towers went down within an hour, the civilians in the camp had to suffer genocide for an entire week. Where was this global information network?

Can anyone claim he witnessed or saw what happened in Jenine?

(This same Sharon who committed the genocide in the Palestinian camps of Sabra and Chatila in Beirut (1982).  Instead of facing international court for crimes against humanity, Sharon was elected Prime Minister of Israel, to repeat his series of genocides he committed in his life.  When Sharon went into coma in 2005, and still is, hideous voices proclaimed “Here goes the last Prophet of Israel”)

Note: Eduardo Galeano is an author and poet from Urugway


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Blog Stats

  • 1,427,016 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 774 other followers

%d bloggers like this: