Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Erdogan

Tidbits and notes posted on FB and Twitter. Part 221

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pa attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory

The basic concept of wealth at all times was: The privileges of buying services and Not just goods. Like having better opportunities to meet with powerful decision makers, buying better equipped prison cells and services, buying better education systems and health systems….

A secular, progressive region in Afrin has been conquered. A Canton with different religions and ethnic groups, with an egalitarian and parity constitution, and living peacefully side by side, is now at the mercy of barbaric, fanatic Islamists hired by this fascist and Moslem Brotherhood Erdogan of Turkey. All with the support of colonial powers wanting to exploit the vast hydrocarbon wealth in North Eat Syria. 

Le grand absent du tutoiement etait le Tu: Olivia ne s’adressait meme plus a quelqu’un “Bon, c’est fini, ces corrections?”

Une personne meprisante cherche partout des gens naifs, des malades… et en trouve facilement.

“Soyez econome de votre mepris: il y a beaucoup de necessiteux”

La haine est proche de l’amour, quand le mepris lui est etranger

L’ imbecile se decouvre a son obsssession d’avoir le mot de la fin: “La betise, c’est de conclure

I watched Bunuel’s film “The obscure object of Desire”. When a woman is seriously scared of having intercourse, she can drive a one-directional male to craziness by her imaginative tricks. He can have everything but the forbidden target, but the animal has to satisfy his reproductive instinct, any which way.

La gourmandise sacree’: La pamoison eprouvee’ par certaines saintes du 13eme siecle au moment d’avaler l’hostie?

Kamal Nader and Hicham Halaoui shared ‎نوبة تود‎’s postThe grandest Palestinian kid: shot in the heart by Israel and still standing tall and looking straight at the murderers
Image may contain: 1 person, standing

Limaza al kol mousser yaakhod ezen min Allah ta yi2oulou 7ayala shi? Fakkro martayn 2abel ma tarsh2o

Mouwatinaat wa mouwatineen tofraneen: 7atta saalat saghirat ma t3abet. Drouri kel tonzimaat madaniyyat tetbana sakef Nahass al 3ali 7atta yetla3ha tartousheh?

Tidbits and notes posted on FB and Twitter. Part 175

Note: I take notes of books I read and comment on events and edit sentences that fit my style. I pa attention to researched documentaries and serious links I receive. The page is long and growing like crazy, and the sections I post contains a month-old events that are worth refreshing your memory.

The confessional and religious divisions embedded in Lebanon’s system (since its creation) along with political familism[3] contribute to restrain the effective participation and emergence of new actors, notably women, thus limiting political turnover.

Next country the US is planning to destabilize is Pakistan. A decade of troubles to China and Russia?

Classifying biological weapons according to effects on specific races is the ultimate racist mentality.

Can we stop this masquerade? All businesses dealt with Germany and the USA, without exception, before, during and after WWI and WWII

If WWI was a colonial war, WWII was for disseminating USA hegemony. Dropping 2 atomic bombs on Japan was the Message. It alienated many allies, first of all, Stalin of the Soviet Union. We are still succumbing to this strategy.

Tu dois etre une coquette madame. Ta petite fille t’ observe and fais comme toi.

After WWII, businessmen sided with USA and most scientists defected to Soviet Union.

Growth in a capitalist system is a total nonsense: transactions in paper money increase, but the productivity of the society is in a free fall.

During the Ottoman Empire, Aleppo was the second most important city after Istanbul. Erdogan plan was to take over this city. Failing this, he stole all the industrial equipment and machinery and tried to destroy the city. Aleppo is back competing with the most industrial cities in Turkey

Absolute Monarchic Jordan counting the number of bread loafs consumed by Syrian refugees. Why it does Not emulate Angelina Jolie who focused on the dignity of the Syrian people?

Iza al Souri bi Sutchi ettabak 3ala Doustour, UN wa Vienna bit sour warana

Hezbollah ghannaj Nabih Berry kteer 7atta rekeb 3ala ktafhon wa baltaj bi esmihem. Ma te dakhlo majaaless mazhabiyyat “shar3iyyat” bi moumarassat al baltajat 

Urgent: ta3yyeen mas2oul fi Hezbollah la temsse7 joukh Nabih. Khallo al Sayyed yehtam bil mashakel al kharijiyyat. Ma 7ada fi ye la7e2 3ala dala3 wa terdayyet khawater Nabih

Worst Chemical Attack in Years in Syria;

U.S. Blames Assad, How convenient

Note: In 2013, I posted this article representing the two sides of the story on using chemical weapons https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2013/08/23/chemical-attacks-in-syria-is-it-a-matter-of-point-of-view-or-point-of-attack/

If you want the truth in reporting, search it in Turkey where journalists and reporters are locked up in prisons. Erdogan is much bloodier and cruel when it comes to exterminating Syrians

Note 1: Many countries are producing modified tear gas agents, far more potent to disperse mass demonstrators and deadly in many cases.  The tear gas have killed many in Egypt, Turkey, Palestine and Tunisia, Pakistan, Thailand…

Note 2: A plausible alternative was that a bomb hit nerve gas reserves stored by the rebels in tunnels… Apparently, antidote nerve gas too were discovered in the tunnels…

30 Years Later, Photos of Hama massacre Emerge From Killings In Syria

Why now? Why never shown before? Political alliances then? Where are the bodies in these pictures? The world was more prude? Facts were known? By whom?

In 1980, the Syrian Moslem Brotherhood launched a series of bloody attacks on Syrian army and police forces. Hafez Assad was in contact with Turkey and Egypt (hotbed of Moslem Brotherhood) in order to reach a negotiated settlement. At no avail. Hama was then surrounded and the insurrection put down. The Syrian Brotherhood was persecuted for decades after the insurrection and many fled to Turkey and the Gulf Emirates.

Currently, No Gulf States or Saudi Kingdom are willing to welcome Syrian refugees, although they were the ones who funded all these extremists factions and armed them with Western weapons

Wikileaks has recently divulged documents testifying that Turkey’s Erdogan is the power behind ISIS and supported its expansion in Iraq in order to control the Kurds there and to impress on Syria to include the Brotherhood in the government.

Syria’s President Hafez Assad brutally crushed an uprising in the central city of Hama in 1982. The event was remarkable not just for the scale of the violence, but also because virtually no photos were published.

As Syrians mark the 30th anniversary, some long-hidden photos are emerging on the Internet, but their origins are difficult, if not impossible, to trace.

In some instances, the photos are of well-known sites in Hama and former residents confirmed the locations. In other instances, there was virtually no information available.

A former Hama resident, Abu Aljude, provided some photos and directed NPR to others.

Syria’s protest generation is obsessed with images.

Thousands of videos have been posted on YouTube during the 10-month revolt against President Bashar Assad’s regime, even as regime snipers take deadly aim at the photographers.

The smugglers who carry critical medical supplies to underground clinics in protest cities also smuggle in cameras hidden in baseball caps and pocket pens. The obsession comes from the conviction that documenting the brutality will stop it — this time.

This is all part of the legacy of the Hama massacre of February 1982, the last time Syrians rose up against the rule of the Assad family.

The facts of that event are well-known, but the photographic evidence has been scant. Then, Syria’s branch of the Muslim Brotherhood led an uprising centered in Hama, a central city of around 400,000.

In response, President Hafez Assad, the father of the current president, ordered 12,000 troops to besiege the city. That force was led by Hafez Assad’s brother Rifaat. He supervised the shelling that reduced parts of Hama to rubble. Those not killed in the tank and air assault were rounded up. Those not executed were jailed for years.

To this day, the death toll is in dispute and is at best an estimate.

Human rights groups, which were not present during the slaughter, have put the toll at around 10,000 dead or more. The Muslim Brotherhood claims 40,000 died in Hama, with 100,000 expelled and 15,000 who disappeared. The number of missing has never been acknowledged by the Syrian leadership. (Was it acknowledge by any international institution?)

Details Emerged Slowly

In the weeks and months that followed, news of the events in Hama dribbled out. But there were virtually no photos or any international reaction.

Yet Hama stands as a defining moment in the Middle East. It is regarded as perhaps the single deadliest act by any Arab government against its own people in the modern Middle East, a shadow that haunts the Assad regime to this day.

And now, three decades later, photos from Hama in 1982 are beginning to circulate on the Internet. One of the people compiling photos of Hama is Abu Aljude, who was a 16-year-old living in Hama at the time of the slaughter.

“It took three weeks. We stayed in school overnight because we couldn’t walk back home. We walked over dead bodies. There were bodies in the streets,” says Abu Aljude, now a medical technical expert living in California.

“I wonder if dying then is less painful than surviving it and living the memories,” he says. Abu Aljude still has relatives in Hama and fears they could face reprisals if his full name were revealed.

Many of the Hama survivors fled to the United Arab Emirates, including Firas Tayar.

“When the soldiers came, they took my father, then they came back to take my brother. They killed them,” says Tayar. “My mother cried and said, ‘Please leave me the rest of my children.’ ”

Tayar says the images of burning bodies in the streets are burned into his memory. “They hammered it, they ended it,” Tayar says of the regime’s scorched-earth policy that put down the rebellion.

While the Syrian army was still laying siege to Hama, Abu Aljude and other members of his family fled for Saudi Arabia. As he was preparing to go, a neighbor handed over snapshots of the savage destruction to Abu Aljude for safekeeping.

“I had pictures,” says Abu Aljude, “but I didn’t know what to do with them.”

Daily Videos Of Current Violence

These photos are part of the slim documentation of Hama. But these days, the yellowed pictures of Hama in 1982 are making it to the Internet, along with the current cellphone videos of the latest assaults by the security forces on Hama and other restive towns.

A new generation under siege has modern tools to document and distribute recordings of regime brutality, but increasingly wonders whether the images make any difference as the world looks on.

“Politically, it has affected the Assad regime. But does it bring in the cavalry? No,” says Andrew Tabler, a Syrian expert and author of a recent book, In the Lion’s Den: An Eyewitness Account of Washington’s Battle with Syria.

(Note: The siege of Hama coincided with the pre-emptive invasion of Israel to Lebanon. Israel even entered the Capital Beirut and remained in south Lebanon till 2000)

He believes the thousands of videos have constrained the Assad regime to some degree.

When President Hafez Assad unleashed the air force on the Syrian population in 1982, he had no real worries about “outside interference.”

But with the Arab uprisings of the past year, it has been a very different story. When Arab autocrats have employed brutal tactics, these actions have immediately been turned into videos and photographs that have stirred up additional opposition, both domestically and abroad.

In Syria, more than 5,000 people have been killed since last spring, according to human rights groups and the Syrian opposition. The daily death toll has been at a level that has provoked considerable outrage inside the country and around the world. But so far, there’s been no direct intervention from a divided international community.

A widely circulated tweet from the current uprising, which refers to the restive city of Homs, makes the point: “Homs 2011 = Hama 1982, but slowly, slowly.”

In his book, Tabler writes that after the 1982 assault on Hama, “the regime also launched a sweeping campaign of arrests — not only of suspected Brotherhood members but virtually all regime opponents, including communists and Arab nationalists who hated the Brotherhood as much as the regime.”

Hama Crackdown A Warning To Others

The Hama revolt began as a sectarian challenge, with the Sunni Muslims of the Brotherhood against the minority Alawite sect that dominates the regime and the upper ranks of the military. After it was crushed, it then became a lesson to any challenger to Assad family rule.

The “Hama example” stood firm until the spring of 2011. A new generation, armed only with cameras in the early days of the revolution, gambled that images could help them succeed where the Hama uprising had failed.

“This is revolutionary karma. It’s payback,” says Tabler, who explains that this new generation has a direct link to the events in Hama years ago. (A direct link to Turkey’s Erdogan expansionist dreams into Syria and Iraq)

After the decisive crackdown back then, the Syrian economy plunged into a deep recession. A terrorized population dared no further unrest and did not speak about the events, even in whispers.

“Many Syrians were forced to stay home,” writes Tabler, “causing a decade-long increase in birthrates.” Every Arab country has a youth bulge, but the “Hama effect” put Syria in the top 20 fastest growing populations in the world, which created a population “time bomb.” The generation on the streets today, says Tabler, is a demographic wave, “the residue from that crackdown has come to haunt the country.”

After 10 months, grass-roots organizers of this uprising issued a joint statement ahead of the anniversary of the Hama massacre. For the first time in 30 years, “We hold a remembrance for this anniversary and the Hama victims inside Syria.”

The protests, scheduled for Friday around the country, are being called “Pardon, Hama … Forgive Us.” The aim is to show that a memory, even if long suppressed, is as powerful as a current image.

And the Purge Begins In Turkey:

Planned before the failed military coup

The coup in Turkey is over, and now the purge begins.

On Saturday, Turkish soldiers and police—those who had remained loyal to President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan during the uncertain hours of the previous day—were rounding up their enemies across the security services, reportedly arresting thousands. There will be thousands more.

In the high-stakes world of Turkish politics—nominally democratic but played with authoritarian ferocity—justice for the losers will be swift and brutal.

The remarkable thing about Friday’s coup attempt is not that it failed but that, after years of Erdoğan’s relentless purging of his opposition, there was a faction inside the Turkish military strong enough to mount one at all.

The confrontation was a long time coming.

When Erdoğan first became Prime Minister, in 2003, he was the Islamic world’s great democratic hope, a leader of enormous vitality who would show the world that an avowedly Islamist politician could lead a stable democracy and carry on as a member of NATO, too.

Those hopes evaporated quickly.

Erdoğan, who was elected Turkey’s president in 2014, has taken a page from Vladimir Putin’s playbook, using democratic institutions to legitimize his rule while crushing his opponents, with an eye to ultimately smothering democracy itself.

Over the past decade, Erdoğan has silenced, marginalized, or crushed nearly anyone in the country who might oppose him, including newspaper editors, university professors, aid workers, and dissident politicians. (What an irony that Erdoğan, who has imprisoned so many journalists, and gone to great lengths to censor Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, may have saved his Presidency by using FaceTime to make an early Saturday appearance on a Turkish television news channel.)

President Obama and other Western leaders, seeing Erdoğan as a bulwark against chaos, largely gave him a pass.

In his most recent grab for authoritarian powers, Erdoğan pushed through a law that stripped members of parliament of immunity from prosecution, a measure that his critics fear, with good reason, that he will use to remove the few remaining lawmakers who still oppose him.

Then there’s the military.

Since the Turkish republic was founded, in 1923, the county’s generals have imagined themselves the ultimate arbiters of its politics, stepping into power—sometimes savagely—whenever they felt the government had become either too leftist or too Islamic.

(After the military overthrew a democratically elected government in 1960, the generals executed the Prime Minister.) The military has had a special contempt for Erdoğan, whom they regarded as a dangerous Islamist—but they have proven no match for him.

In 2007, Erdoğan’s henchmen initiated a series of show trials, known collectively as Sledgehammer, in which fabricated evidence was used to remove the top tier of the Turkish officer corps.

Hundreds were sent to prison, and the military itself seemed banished from politics forever.

Indeed, Erdoğan must have been surprised that there was still a dissident faction of the armed forces large enough to try to bring him down. On Friday, the coup’s organizers didn’t even have the sense to detain the man they were trying to overthrow, and they apparently never seriously contemplated shooting their way into the palace.

(After a coup in 1980, the military killed and imprisoned tens of thousands.) In the wake of their failure, the military will be soon be under Erdoğan’s total control, like virtually every other institution in the country.

Andrew Bossone shared this link

Erdogan called the coup attempt “a gift from god.” He even called the Turkish army The army of Mohammad

newyorker.com|By Dexter Filkins. July 16, 2016

In his dramatic appearance at Istanbul’s Atatürk Airport on Friday night, Erdoğan blamed the insurrection on the exiled cleric Fatullah Gulen, a reclusive figure who lives in the Poconos (Pennsylvania). “I have a message for Pennsylvania,’’ Erdoğan said, a reference that must have baffled many non-Turks. “You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

Gulen, an aging cleric who heads one of the world’s largest Islamic orders, fled Turkey in 1999, when it appeared that the military was going to arrest him.

For years, Gulen was one of Erdoğan’s closest allies, helping him in his rise to power. While Gulen preaches a message of love and tolerance, there has often been something mysterious about him and his followers, who do not readily advertise either their affiliation or their intentions.

Over the years, Gulen’s followers quietly found positions within many Turkish institutions, particularly the courts and police. (It was the Gulenists who led the show trials against the generals and the press.)

In 2008, James Jeffrey, the American ambassador, wrote a memo about the Gulenist infiltration of the Turkish National Police. “The assertion that the T.N.P is controlled by the Gulenists is impossible to confirm, but we have found no one who disputes it,” Jeffrey said.

Then, in 2013, Gulen and Erdoğan split, in what appears to be part of a naked struggle for power.

In the years since, Erdoğan has purged the courts and police of thousands of men and women presumed to be Gulen loyalists. It’s hard to know whether Gulen was behind Friday’s attempted putsch, but at this point it seems unlikely.

While Gulen’s followers predominated in the security services, they were not generally believed to be a large force inside the military. It seems more likely that the officers who led the revolt represented the remnant of the military’s old secular order. Now they’re finished.

During his speech last night at the Istanbul airport, Erdoğan referred to the attempted coup as a “gift from God.” Erdoğan is usually a precise speaker, but in this case, perhaps in his excitement, he showed his cards.

With the coup attempt thwarted, he will no doubt seize the moment. In recent months, Erdogan has made little secret of his desire to rewrite the constitution to give himself near total power. There will be no stopping him now.

Note 1: French foreign minister reminded Erdogan that the military coup cannot extend Erdogan any blank check to do whatever he pleases: No executions or trials without due process. The EU constitution should be respected, otherwise, Turkey should kiss good-bye to adhering to the EU

Note 2: The Turkish police force invaded the US Injerlik air-force base, confirming my conjecture that the US was partially behind this coup.

Note 3: Summer tourism to Turkey is Shot. Greece will take the slack. Instability is there to stay for a long while.

Note 4: The successive news are confirming my story https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2016/07/16/military-coup-in-turkey-objectives-and-potential-consequences/

 

Military coup in Turkey: Objectives and potential consequences

The military coup in Turkey was a textbook operational success and no military units came out to confront it for 8 hours. The Turkish air force could Not have engage unless the US air-force in Injerlik base gave its green light.

NATO idea was to strike at least two birds in one shot and decided to call off the operations:

1. NATO wanted to remind Erdogan that he should not sign deals with Russia and Iran without prior agreements and negotiation with the USA and Europe

2. Preserve a shaky “Democratic” image of Turkey and force Erdogan Not to slide faster into a Theocratic system of Moslem Brotherhood control of all the institutions

My conjecture is that this tactics (of shooting more than one essential birds) will fail in the medium-term:

1.Erdogan will Not cancel his agreements with Russia or Iran: The NATO will pressure Erdogan to reduce these agreement into a skin-deep understanding

2. The democratic processes will enhance the power of the Moslem Brotherhood in election and erase whatever objective NATO wanted of  a secular Turkey

The benefits of this military coup:

As after each coup, whether successful or Not, Turkey will need a couple of months to regain a semblance of internal control.

This period will witness the withdrawal of Turkish troops outside its borders (read Baashoka in northern Iraq or within northern Syria) and demanding foreign troops inside Turkey (airfields) to reduce their activities.

The consequences for this necessary isolation will give a breathing period for the neighbouring States such as Syria, Iraq, the Armenians in Nagorno-Karabach enclave of Azerbaijan. The benefits are:

1. Reduction of military activities against the Turkish, Syrian and Iraqi Kurdish movement

2. Syria will finally get the green light to recapture all of Aleppo and its surrounding towns, since No Turkish supplies in arms and jihadists will flow inside Syria in the foreseeable future

3. Iraq will complete surrounding greater Mosul by taking the Turkish positions in Ba3shouka.

4. Syria and Iraq will launch a joint operation to take the border city of Abu Kamal, thus denying daesh any logistical routes to Mosul and Rakka.

5. Syria will have to retake Deir el Zour in these joint military operations

6. A serious negotiation for a political settlement in Syria

Note 1: Erdogan called the Turkish army “The Army of prophet Muhammad” in order to oppose any secular positioning of the army.

This “failed” coup was the ideal pretext for Erdogan to fire 2750 judges from their posts who bothered him in his attempts to quell freedom of expression and human rights excesses…. The list was already prepared before the coup, on the ground that they constitute the “deep structure in the institutions” of the Fathallah Gulan movement, and the Sufi culture in Turkey.

Note 2: I watched a documentary on ARTE that shows the southern regions of Turkey, by the Syrian borders, to support Daesh and Al nousra. They are the Turks who vote for Erdogan. Thousands of these Turks left their families and joined the extremist movements in Syria and Iraq.

Note 3: Erdogan claimed that the followers of  Fathallah Gulan (residing in Pennsylvania) are behind this coup d’etat: what is this original Turkish Moslem Brotherhood movement?

https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2010/05/14/a-turkish-cultural-movement-fathallah-gulan/

Turkey’s role in ISIS oil trade: What Russia presented as proof?

And Wikileaks divulged today that Turkey Erdogan personally ordered the downing of the Russian Sukhoi plane

The Russian Defense Ministry held a major briefing on new findings concerning IS funding in Moscow on Wednesday.

According to Deputy Defense Minister Anatoly Antonov, Russia is aware of three main oil smuggling routes to Turkey.

“Today, we are presenting only some of the facts that confirm that a whole team of bandits and Turkish elites stealing oil from their neighbors is operating in the region,

Antonov said, adding that this oil “in large quantities” enters the territory of Turkey via live oil pipelines,” consisting of thousands of oil trucks. (Much of this oil is resold to Israel)

The routes of alleged oil smuggling from Syria and Iraq to Turkey © syria.mil.ru

Antonov added that Turkey is the main buyer of smuggled oil coming from Iraq and Syria. (Among other goods like artefacts, entire industrial plants in Aleppo…)

According to our data, the top political leadership of the country – President Erdogan and his family – is involved in this criminal business.”

However, since the start of Russia’s anti-terrorist operation in Syria on September 30, the income of Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS) militants from illegal oil smuggling has been significantly reduced, the ministry said.

The income of this terrorist organization was about $3 million per day. After two months of Russian airstrikes their income was about $1.5 million a day,” Lieutenant-General Sergey Rudskoy said.

Carole Chemali  shared this link via May Shigenobu. December 4, 2015

“The Russian Defense Ministry has released evidence which it says unmasks vast illegal oil trade by Islamic State and points to Turkey as the main destination for the smuggled petrol, implicating its leadership in aiding the terrorists.”

rt.com

For the past two months, Russia’s airstrikes hit 32 oil complexes, 11 refineries, 23 oil pumping stations, Rudskoy said, adding that the Russian military had also destroyed 1,080 trucks carrying oil products.

“These [airstrikes] helped reduce the trade of the oil illegally extracted on the Syrian territory by almost 50 percent.”

Up to 2,000 fighters, 120 tons of ammunition and 250 vehicles have been delivered to Islamic State and Al-Nusra militants from Turkish territory, chief of National Centre for State Defense Control Lt.Gen. Mikhail Mizintsev said.

According to reliable intelligence reports, the Turkish side has been taking such actions for a long time and on a regular basis. And most importantly, it is not planning to stop them.”

“One thing is clear. The role that Turkey is playing in this area is in many ways destructive and it’s affecting the European security, it’s affecting its neighbors. Ultimately it’s affecting its own society,” Uzi Arad, former head of research at Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency told RT.

Responding to the Russian allegations, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said that nobody had a right to “slander” Turkey by accusing it of buying oil from Islamic State.

Speaking at a university in the Qatari capital, Doha, on Wednesday, Erdogan once again claimed that he would resign if such accusations were proven to be true and stressed that he did not want Turkey’s relations with Russia to deteriorate further.

Following Russian accusations, the US has again defended Turkey, denying any ties between Ankara and Islamic State.

“We flatly reject any notion that the Turks are somehow working with ISIL. Preposterous. And really very, kind of ridiculous,” Steve Warren, Pentagon spokesman, said. (What’s stupid is going contrary to all facts and opinions in the region)
He called Turkey “a great partner” to Washington in fighting against IS terrorists in Syrian and Iraq.

“They’re hosting our aircraft. They’re conducting strikes. They’re supporting the moderate Syrian opposition,” Warren explained. (Do these activities disconfirm the facts?)

Iraq will immediately file a protest in the UN Security Council if claims that Turkey is illegally purchasing oil from Islamic State terrorists are confirmed, the Iraqi Defense Ministry said.

“If the Iraqi government receives enough evidence and details, without any hesitation it will file a protest at the UN Security Council and all other relevant international bodies,” Naseer Nuri, ministry’s spokesman, told Sputnik.

According to Nuri, certain “general information about the smuggling of Iraqi oil by trucks to certain countries, including Turkey” is already available.

“This oil is used to fund Daesh (IS)”, he added.

Note: Turkey established a military camp smack inside Iraq’s northern territory in the province of Ninawa (Nineveh) just to protect the flow of stolen oil


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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