Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘first Intifada

Tidbits and Notes. Part 258

“What acts like apartheid, is run like apartheid & harasses like apartheid, is not a duck — it’s apartheid

More than 200 Palestinian prisoners have died inside Israeli jails! . . . Israel arrested 337,000 Palestinians since 1987

100,000 British troops were dispatched to tame the first Intifada of 1936: The Palestinians demanded and were denied municipal elections

En Uttar Pradesh (India), le viol est une epidemie et une arme puissante: les soeurs de celui qui fraye avec une femme mariee’ sont violees, la femme de l’homme qui a des dettes est violee’, les soeurs de celui qui se marie avec une femme d’une caste superieur sont violee’….

In a world where media is global, social, ubiquitous and cheap, in a world of media where the former audience are now increasingly full participants, in that world, media is less and less often about crafting a single message to be consumed by individuals. It is more often a way of creating an environment for convening and supporting groups.

The question we all face now is, “How can we make best use of this social media? Even though it means changing the way we’ve always done it.”

“The mainstreaming of mysticism also overlaps with the broader interests of millennial—think yoga and meditation, mindfulness, and New Age spirituality. With that foundation, it might Not be a stretch to show up for pagan holidays or new moon gatherings, or begin to explore the more serious spiritual concepts at the root of these practices.” (Sangeeta Singh-Kurtz on witchcraft and “mysticore” in the age of Instagram)

The multilateral trading system “receives its inspiration from economists, is shaped primarily by lawyers, but must operate within the limits that the politicians set,” ‘s Anabel Gonzalez

Israel believed that it could kill and assassinate Palestinians without due judicial process: This wave of Palestinian reprisals will continue until some kind of basic common sense hit the Israeli society

Le plus souvent, on cesse d’aimer quand le partenaire refuse frequement de se battre pour une vie de qualitee’.

La Verite’ ne concerne pas les avocats, la Justice et les politiciens: Les interets cherchent une “verite'” plausible et logique.

People who perceive (separate) their work self from your home self identities are more likely to make unethical decisions.

Maggie Doyne (23 year-old) has a home with 50 orphan children

Une personne stigmatise’ est un individu afflige’ dont on a attache’ un attribut qui le differencie de la caser dans la catagorie “Normal”

Discrimination: Toute distinction operee’ entre les personnes en raison de leur origine, sex, situaton familiale, grossesse, apparence physique, patronyme, etat de sante’, handicap, orientation sexuelle, age, opinion publique, activites syndicales, ethnicite’, race, religion determinee’… No, there are No normal people, we are are all discriminated against.

The colonial powers managed to construct a minimum denominator splitting of the Muslim world in order to decide which countries to ally with. You have got the Shiaa of Iran, the Wahhabi movement of the Arabic peninsula and the Muslim Brotherhood movement. Turkey and Qatar sponsored the Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, Egypt, Libya and Gaza. 

The Carpenters (Karen and Richard), the Bee Gees ( The Gibbs) and Abba were critisized early on by music magazines as too honey. 30 years later, as their bands split and fade away, documented research demonstrated that most current bands have mined their works as the most perfect in voice harmony and lyrics and sensitivities matching early childhood.

Children imitate parents behaviors: Thus, keep reading instead of playing with smart devices

At the end of 2017, China shut its doors to imports of recycled material, citing environmental concerns. That has led to unprecedented disruption in a global industry and thrown the very purpose of recycling into question. (Question: Is China still importing carton and paper from USA for recycling?)

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive compound found in the cannabis plant? It’s cropping up in all manner of products, including lattes, ice cream, and dog treats—even Coca-Cola is reportedly working on a CBD-infused beverage. and CBD is “about as poorly regulated and understood as a product this popular can possibly be.

Small successes fuel courage. You need to be initiated with the fear of failure and gradually overcome it.

Thousands of Venezuelans fleeing their country are expected to enter Peru today to make the cutoff for temporary residency cards.

India unveiled the world’s tallest statue. At 182 meters (600 feet), the statue of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, a leading independence figure who worked with Mahatma Gandhi, is twice the size of New York’s Statue of Liberty. The project was mired in controversy for years and cost $430 million.

“When he introduced the cryptocurrency just months after the 2008 global financial crisis, the Japanese Satoshi Nakamoto portrayed himself as a 36-year-old Japanese man angered by the irresponsibility of banks and governments. His currency would let people make financial transactions those institutions couldn’t touch. So it’s fitting, perhaps, that Satoshi ensured he’d be untouchable as well.” (With Trump financial transaction sanctions on many countries, cryptocurrency should enjoy a great future?)

Invariable positions that constitute the ideological structure must Not include abstract concepts like Freedom, Liberty, Democracy, Equality… any concept that are basically biased and controlled by the elite classes.

2,700 liters of water to produce a single T-shirt?

Apparently, catching cold frequently is the symptom of a transformed constitution that is getting allergic to many items and pathogens that it was previously immune to. Kind of the immune system got set on an old administrative routine and unable to cope with the exponential increase in polluters and human-made poisonous products

Un cadavre est une poche que le mort retourne et vide: Depouiller un cadavre, inextricable achevement.

Pourquoi les proches d’un mort ne le depouillent pas de ses colliers, bagues, bracelets, chevalieres, alliances, piercings et bijoux intime…si la derniere etape est le fumerarium?

Tant pis, les ambulanciers qui transferent la depuoille aux fumerarium ont le “droit de peage” de tout ce que le cadavre emporte de precieux. En ce temps moderne, on n’ensevelit pas les morts avec leurs objets, leurs escalves et leurs femmes. Les archeoogues n’ont qu’a se contenter des temps ancients.

Ce rire meprisant qui decompose le visage, surtout apres avoir affirme’: “J’ aime une autre personne”. Ce rire, qui veut sortir d’une situation trop encombrante, a tue’ beaucoup de jeunes (surtout des filles) et embarasse’ beaucoup de jeunes adolescents pour la vie.

What I say is plain mental conjecture: I didn’t Experience acute emotional or physical hardship. Except acute shortage of money to learn and practice luxury taste.

Trump is giving the Obama/Hillary le coup de grace: totally defeating ISIS, their creation, in Syria and Iraq. The entrance of Syria troops in Membej means that the task of crushing Daesh is transferred to Syria and Iraq 7ashed Sha3bi, the most battled experienced armies in finishing the job.

It is a victory, when an opportunity knocks and you learn something new. Mostly on emotions complexity

It is no longer that important that I fall in love: since I didn’t fall in love in my youth, whatever I dream of is irrelevant

Got to go back to school: set my mind to create a new knowledge discipline

Must apply the experimental mind in architecture: Beauty has to match health and safety 

Don’t expect an apology from me: I have got to come to term with myself and forgive myself of all the successive failures in my life. Stay in line and just cross your fingers

Tidbits and Notes. Part 257

“What acts like apartheid, is run like apartheid & harasses like apartheid, is not a duck — it’s apartheid

More than 200 Palestinian prisoners have died inside Israeli jails! . . . Israel arrested 337,000 Palestinians since 1987

100,000 British troops were dispatched to tame the first Intifada of 1936: The Palestinians demanded and were denied municipal elections

En Uttar Pradesh (Inde), le viol est une epidemie et une arme puissante: les soeurs de celui qui fraye avec une femme mariee’ sont violees, la femme de l’homme qui a des dettes est violee’, les soeurs de celui qui se marie avec une femme d’une caste superieur sont violee’….

In a world where media is global, social, ubiquitous and cheap, in a world of media where the former audience are now increasingly full participants, in that world, media is less and less often about crafting a single message to be consumed by individuals. It is more and more often a way of creating an environment for convening and supporting groups.

The question we all face now is, “How can we make best use of this social media? Even though it means changing the way we’ve always done it.”

“The mainstreaming of mysticism also overlaps with the broader interests of millennial—think yoga and meditation, mindfulness, and New Age spirituality. With that foundation, it might not be a stretch to show up for pagan holidays or new moon gatherings, or begin to explore the more serious spiritual concepts at the root of these practices.” (Sangeeta Singh-Kurtz on witchcraft and “mysticore” in the age of Instagram)

The multilateral trading system “receives its inspiration from economists, is shaped primarily by lawyers, but must operate within the limits that the politicians set,” ‘s Anabel Gonzalez

Israel believed that it could kill and assassinate Palestinians without due judicial process: This wave of Palestinian reprisals will continue until some kind of basic common sense hit the Israeli society

Le plus souvent, on cesse d’aimer quand le partenaire refuse frequement de se battre pour une vie de qualitee’.

La Verite’ (truth) ne concerne pas les avocats, la Justice et les politiciens: Les interets cherchent une “verite'” plausible et logique.

Une personne stigmatise’ est un individu afflige’ dont on a attache’ un attribut qui le differencie de la caser dans la catagorie “Normal”

Discrimination: Toute distinction operee’ entre les personnes en raison de leur origine, sex, situaton familiale, grossesse, apparence physique, patronyme, etat de sante’, handicap, orientation sexuelle, age, opinion publique, activites syndicales, ethnicite’, race, religion determinee’… No, there are No normal people, we are all discriminated against.

The colonial powers managed to construct a minimum denominator splitting of the Muslim world in order to decide which countries to ally with. You have got the Shiaa of Iran, the Wahhabi movement of the Arabic peninsula and the Muslim Brotherhood movement. Turkey and Qatar sponsored the Muslim Brotherhood in Syria, Egypt, Libya and Gaza. 

The Carpenters (Karen and Richard), the Bee Gees ( The Gibbs) and Abba were criticised early on by music magazines as too honey. 30 years later, as their bands split and fade away, documented research demonstrated that most current bands have mined their works as the most perfect in voice harmony and lyrics and sensitivities matching early childhood.

Children imitate parents behaviors: Thus, keep reading instead of playing with smart devices

At the end of 2017, China shut its doors to imports of recycled material, citing environmental concerns. That has led to unprecedented disruption in a global industry and thrown the very purpose of recycling into question. (Question: Is China still importing carton and paper from USA for recycling?)

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive compound found in the cannabis plant? It’s cropping up in all manner of products, including lattes, ice cream, and dog treats—even Coca-Cola is reportedly working on a CBD-infused beverage. and CBD is “about as poorly regulated and understood as a product this popular can possibly be.

Small successes fuel courage. You need to be initiated with the fear of failure and overcome it gradually.

Thousands of Venezuelans fleeing their country are expected to enter Peru today to make the cutoff for temporary residency cards.

“A Watershed Moment in Palestinian History”: Interview with Jamal Juma’

Israel/Palestine

 on 

For weeks now, (since the pronouncement of Trump on Jerusalem Capital of Israel) Palestinians everywhere have been galvanized by events taking place in the Gaza Strip, the site of weekly (since March 30) mass protests demanding the end of the siege and blockade of Gaza (in place now since 2007) and the right to return to the homes from which they or their elders had been transferred (kicked out) since Israel creation in 1948.

Dubbed the Great March of Return, Palestinians in Gaza have assembled as close as they can to the Israeli-designated buffer zone separating Gaza from Israel.

Israeli soldiers at a distance, crouched behind earth barriers that they created in the days preceding the march, and at absolutely no danger of attack from the unarmed protestors, pick off demonstrators at their leisure (with live bullets, assassinating over 160  and targeting the legs to handicap the marchers, over 1,600 badly injured)

By June 14, at least 129 Palestinians had been killed and 13,000 injured; the dead included medics like the 21-year-old Razan al-Najjar and journalists including Yaser Murtaja—typically seen as off-limits in conflict zones but transformed by Israel into prime targets.

Jamal Juma’ leads a nonviolent march against the Israeli Separation Wall in the West Bank town of Al Walaja.

On June 4, I spoke to Jamal Juma’, coordinator of the Palestinian Grassroots Anti-Apartheid Wall Campaign, about the popular resistance in Gaza, the Trump administration’s policy toward the question of Palestine, and Palestinian options to chart a new course.

Ida AudehI interviewed you in August 2011 to learn more about the separation wall and its effect on communities in its path. Describe Israel’s current system of control over the occupied territories, of which the wall is a part.

Jamal Juma’: It is clear that the wall was designed to isolate and lay siege to Palestinians. The project to place Palestinians under siege by means of the wall has been completed.

It closed off all the dynamic areas that Israel considered necessary to isolate various areas. 80% of the Wall is within the West Bank. The second part of the siege is reinforcement of the settlements.

Each settlement has what Israel calls a buffer zone – a security apparatus consisting of barbed wire and roads that Palestinians are not allowed to use.

This, together with the alternative (bypass) roads (which we call the apartheid roads), allows them to control the territory. Today there are two road networks: one is for Israeli settlers, about 1,400 km long, and its purpose is to connect all settlements to one another and to Israel in a kind of network. And this is complete.

This network is the dominant one in the West bank, and it includes the major roads. The other network, the alternative roads, is for Palestinians to use; these roads will intersect through 48 planned tunnels and bridges, some of which have been created already.

The two road systems are separate. This is the basis of the racist discriminatory system we talk about: isolating Palestinians and confining them in limited spaces, control of their resources through settlements, the road network, and military installations, and the wall, which take up about 62% of the area of the West Bank.

With the extension of the settlements, we no longer just talk about Palestinians being ghettoized in the north, south, and central region. There is more fragmentation of Palestinian residential areas.

New settlement outposts are not being discussed in terms of whether they should be removed or not.  They are being transformed into settlements. When you see 150 outposts, you are really talking about 150 new settlements. This project is being intensified, and especially since Trump took office.

IA: So you noticed a clear acceleration after Trump?

JJ: It’s much more than an acceleration. This is a watershed moment in Palestinian history. Since Trump took office, US policy fully adopted the Zionist project and embarked on a process of liquidating the Palestinian cause, of eliminating it. It is clear program.

This began with Jerusalem and the recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of the Zionist entity, the transfer of the embassy, targeting the refugees by cutting financing of UNRWA, and other forms of pressure on areas that host large numbers of refugees including getting them settled permanently in the host countries.

Israeli colonization, the geographic engineering of the political map, is another component in the liquidation of the Palestinian cause. Israeli proposals for colonization are massive.

They are concentrating on the Jordan Valley – creating new settlements, expanding existing settlements, creating the supportive infrastructure, and huge incentives are given to Israelis who work in agriculture (including cash payments of $20,000 for anyone willing to move there).

Now the settlements are on the tops of the mountain chain that overlook the Jordan Valley, which enable them to encircle lower lying towns.

When you talk about Ariel, Ma’ale Adumim, and so on, it will be as though the entire West Bank is a suburb of Tel Aviv. This will make it impossible for there to be any separation in the future, for there to be any independent Palestinian entity; instead, an apartheid system of cantons will be imposed on Palestinians.  This is the reality on the ground.

Back to the new US policy: In addition to a shift in standing US positions on Jerusalem and the refugee issue, there is the use of Arab countries that are ready for normalization with Israel and eager to be aligned with the American project – first and foremost, Saudi Arabia, and also Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, and Egypt, which are pressuring the Palestinians to accept the US project to liquidate the Palestinian cause.

This has complicated things and taken it out of the sphere of international law and the UN; everyone had previously worked within that framework. We have been demanding the implementation of resolutions. But the US dealt a blow to international law.

IA: The US now proposes the “deal of the century,” which Gulf states are eagerly endorsing. Can you describe the contours of that deal?

JJ: The proposal is to create a Palestinian state in Gaza with extensions into the Sinai Desert, to be administered by the Palestinian Authority. The West Bank and Jerusalem are not part of these calculations, although Israel might be willing to give up some areas around Jerusalem that are densely populated with Palestinians.

(This part of the proposal has been floated by extremist Israeli groups even before the Trump proposal.)

They might be willing to remove from Greater Jerusalem areas with high Palestinian density, like Jabal Mukkaber, Isawiya, Silwan, and Sur Bahir. 

There has been some discussion about removing Beit Hanina and Shufat.

The Israelis would retain control of the Jewish settlements and the Old City, which together make up about 87% of the area of East Jerusalem—not exactly a small territory.

IA: What is the Palestinian response to these plans?

JJ:  On the formal political level, the PA is in a crisis. It placed its faith in the US, but now US determination to liquidate the Palestinian cause is very clear.

(The “Palestinian Authority” never placed faith in USA: they had no serious political or financial support alternative from anyone. Those employees, waiting for their monthly paycheck or stipend, just hide their head in the dirt and wished they die before they watch another Nakba)

The only real option remaining to the PA is to cast its lot with the Palestinian people and on free people around the world, international solidarity and movements that support us. The Palestinian people have to make a decision, and so does the PA.

On the popular level, we see serious activity in search of an alternative to the status quo, the largest and the most important of which is taking place now in Gaza with the Great March of Return. These actions are important for a number of reasons. They changed the stereotypes about Gaza as a launchpad for rockets, a place of terrorism that has been hijacked by Hamas.

In fact, the marches in Gaza since March 30 represent a widespread popular movement, massive popular resistance. Just like the first intifada emerged from Jabaliya in the Gaza Strip, today we have the beginnings of a mass civil disobedience movement.

(Note: the First Intifada took place in 1935 against the British mandated power for refusing to organize democratic elections, even in municipality, on the ground that the Jews were minorities. Britain dispatched 100,000 troop to quell this civil disobedience that lasted 3 years and exacted horror torture techniques)

Gaza has a population that is resisting, and Hamas does not control this resistance. The discourse we generally hear, that Hamas is leading people to their death, should be recognized as racist and dehumanizing.

People are not robots. Gazans of all ages, family situations, and economic and educational levels are taking part in these marches to raise their cause to the world.  These people are saying that the siege of Gaza cannot continue. We are human beings, we have rights, and one of those rights is to live like human beings. Gaza is no longer inhabitable.

Gaza has been turned into a prison and a hell. Even the UN acknowledges that. The numbers around Gaza are just astounding.

The Great March has returned focus on the refugee issue and put it squarely on the table despite all the efforts to ignore and erase it. More than 70% of Gaza residents are refugees, and they are demanding the right to return to their original hometowns.

For that reason, the marches in Gaza are very important in defining the trajectory of the Palestinian question and restoring the role of popular resistance to the forefront. They lay the popular foundation for the coming phase. They might also have prevented another massive disaster.

I think Israel was preparing to implement the Trump administration’s proposals; the scenario that the Israelis were planning for was to pull Gaza into a military confrontation, which would justify more intense bombing than it has done in the past.

The borders with Egypt would open, and people would flee into Egypt. But the mass participation in the march thwarted that plan.

IA: I find it hard to understand how Ramallah can be so tranquil considering the carnage in Gaza.

JJ:  It might seem that what is happening in the West Bank is not at all comparable to what is happening in Gaza. And that is true, it isn’t as massive. But actions are taking place in the West Bank, and they are also important.

On a weekly basis people are gathering to protest at the checkpoints.

Since 2011 there have been continuous outbursts (in Arabic, habbat); for example, in Jerusalem in the Bab al-Shams encampment and in the aftermath of the Abu Khdeir and Dawabshe killings (January 2013, July 2014, and July 2015, respectively).*

These outbursts were significant and exemplary, the way Gaza is today. They reminded us of what the Palestinian people are capable of doing. I expect that these outbursts here and there will lead to widespread civil disobedience. Young people in Jerusalem and the West Bank have been going out to checkpoints in the hundreds, on a daily basis, and these conditions put one in the mindset of the first intifada.

We should take note of what Palestinians in Israel are doing as well. There are youth movements that are taking action in ways that are very impressive and a source of pride.  They defy the occupation and they involve large numbers of people, in Haifa and elsewhere.

IA: Let’s look at the relationship of Palestinians to formal political bodies. Recently the Palestinian National Council held its first meeting in 22 years. One might have thought that over the course of more than two decades, several issues and events warranted a meeting – regional events, the assassination of Yasir Arafat, and the status of the Oslo accords come to mind. But the convening of the PNC doesn’t seem to have generated much popular interest.

JJ: People did not pay much attention to it, but in fact they should be talking about it because it poses a threat. Meeting for the first time in 22 years, it did not even discuss what it has done since the last meeting! What it did do is effectively cancel itself, which means it is changing the structure of the PLO. There is an attempt to replace the Central Committee with a body consisting of the private sector, the political currents in the PA today, and elements of the security apparatus. No representation of Palestinians from the 1948 areas, or the diaspora, or even the Palestinian street. This is a threat to the Palestinian project.

The PLO as it has been transformed by Mahmoud Abbas threatens the national cause. It has been hijacked; our task is to restore it as a representative and unifying entity that works to support the Palestinian cause. The reform should be led by Palestinian groups and movements.

People have no confidence in the leadership; they don’t think it is capable of leading in the coming phase.  In fact, the outbursts I referred to earlier had the potential of triggering a third intifada. People were waiting for a leadership to emerge, as happened during the first intifada; three months into the intifada, a unified leadership emerged and took charge. But this time, the PA wasn’t interested in assuming that role; three months into these protests, the PA sent its people to disrupt actions and prevent young people from gathering at checkpoints. The national factions were unable to form a unified leadership for obvious reasons.

IA: What is the alternative?

JJ: People have to create a national movement that can lead the change. What will lead the movement for change will not be a single individual. It will be a widespread national movement that has a real relationship with people on the ground, a movement that will direct the street. This is the only way change will take place. People have been waiting for a long time, but who are we waiting for? There is not going to be a great charismatic leader. We don’t talk about a heroic leader, we talk about a heroic people and a leadership of institutions.

We want a Palestinian state that represents all Palestinians. Within that broad outline, we say that right now, we have to protect the Palestinian project – the right to self-determination, and we all struggle for that right. We don’t have to get into a discussion about the final outcome. The time for the two state solution is clearly over—and in fact, that proposal provided the basis for trying to destroy our cause. The other option is clear. But like I said, we don’t want that discussion to detract from our focus now or to place us in conflict with the position of the PLO.

How do we support the Palestinian project? We have to confront what is happening in Jerusalem, the settlements. There has to be a practical program, not just slogans on paper. Palestinians in the diaspora should support these activities, get involved in the boycott movement, because we are part of that boycott movement.

We are trying to keep the political work and the boycott movement separate to protect the boycott movement, because there is a Palestinian effort underway to weaken the BDS movement; through normalization, by invoking the PLO position. We consider the boycott movement an essential component of our activism.

This is what people are discussing today, here and with our people in the 1948 areas, and in the diaspora. Many meetings have taken place, and they are being expanded. I expect that in the next few weeks there will be a meeting to put in writing some of the agreed upon principles underlying all of these actions. There has to be a movement that preserves the unity of the Palestinian people and protects the national cause from liquidation. That’s what we are working on now.

Notes

* The 2013 encampment known as Bab al-Shams was an attempt by Palestinians to thwart Israeli plans to establish a settlement on land in the E1 zone, between East Jerusalem and the Jewish-only settlement Ma’ale Adumim; the Israeli plan was designed to permanently sever the West Bank from East Jerusalem. Another encampment, Bab al-Karama, was set up in Beit Iksa and stormed by Israeli soldiers two days later.

In July 2014, Israeli settlers in Jerusalem abducted 16-year-old Mohammad Abu Khdeir from Shufat and set him on fire; the ensuing demonstrations resulted in 160 Palestinians injured. Israel’s assault on Gaza began five days later. One year later, settlers set fire to the Dawabshe home in Duma. The soul survivor of the attack was a 4-year-old child; the child’s parents and infant brother were killed. In 2015, a tent encampment, “Gate of Jerusalem,” was set up in Abu Dis to protest the Israeli government’s plans to displace Bedouin communities there.

Beginning in September 2015 and lasting until the end of the year, protests spread from the al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem throughout the West Bank; 108 Palestinians were killed and 12,260 were injured.  Palestinians in Israel demonstrated in solidarity.

About Ida Audeh is a Palestinian from the West Bank who lives in Colorado. She is the editor of Birzeit University: The Story of a National Institution, published by Birzeit University in 2010. Other posts by .

Keep those cameras rolling:  Viral video of an Israeli soldier trying to arrest a 12-year-old Palestinian

You have probably watched the viral video of the Palestinian women snatching a Palestinian child from the hands of an Israeli soldier, as he was trying to arrest the boy for rock-throwing.

If you missed it, no worries: as long as Israel’s occupation of the West Bank continues, you will have many more opportunities to watch similarly disturbing images.

Because as long as the occupation continues, and combat soldiers are sent to police an occupied hostile civilian population, this ugliness is unavoidable.

Andrew Bossone shared this link

“The children-chasing soldiers of the late 1980s now have children of their own, who today are chasing the kids of the Palestinians who threw rocks at their parents.

And so it goes.

Generations of occupiers and occupied, chasing each other on the same hills, throwing the same rocks, engaged in the same embrace of occupation, enmity and revenge.”

The viral video of an Israeli soldier trying to arrest a 12-year-old with his arm in a cast is an example of how technology is driving a change of public opinion
theguardian.com|By Ori Nir

There’s nothing new about it. Journalists who covered the West Bank for 30 years saw these sights numerous times.

I recently stumbled upon a story that I wrote almost 30 years ago, describing the aftermath of a clash between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian teens at a refugee camp near Ramallah.

It happened about two months into the first intifada.

At the end of the demonstration, soldiers dragged toward a bus several children who they had captured during the confrontation. Women gathered and tried to pull the children away from the soldiers. They failed.

As the bus left the scene, a couple of tear gas grenades were tossed from the window, sending the women back to their homes.

I can’t tell you how many times I have seen Palestinian women quarrelling with Israeli soldiers, trying to prevent their sons or brothers from being arrested.

There were even times when proud Palestinian teens being detained by the IDF would urge their moms to pull back so as not to be embarrassed before their peers.

From an Israeli military perspective, these scenes were as pathetic then as they are now.

The soldiers, annoyed and humiliated by rock-throwers but weighed down by military gear, would play cat-and-mouse with the kids.

They were typically able to catch only the slower ones, those who were either overweight or injured, such as the bandaged tween seen in the recent video.

The terrified kids sometimes wet their pants on their way to the military jeep. And the soldiers, often members of select combat units, complained that instead of fighting enemy armies, they had been reduced to chasing children and smacking them with sticks.

The children-chasing soldiers of the late 1980s now have children of their own, who today are chasing the kids of the Palestinians who threw rocks at their parents.

And so it goes. Generations of occupiers and occupied, chasing each other on the same hills, throwing the same rocks, engaged in the same embrace of occupation, enmity and revenge.

Still, there are some noticeable changes in this sickening dynamic.

One is that Palestinians today are much bolder. While Palestinian women have been pulling their loved ones away from Israeli soldiers for a couple of generations, I can’t remember the kind of fearlessness that we have seen in recent videos, images of Palestinian men and women having fist-fights with armed Israeli soldiers.

Where does this new courage come from?

It may in part be that Palestinians are in such despair, as the occupation is about to turn 50 and with no end in sight, that they increasingly feel they have nothing left to lose.

Without a doubt, though, what is radically different today is the ubiquity of cameras. And this is where I find hope.

Back in the 1980s, cameras were scarce in the West Bank. Video cameras were almost non-existent. Israeli soldiers knew that they could almost always get away with actions that were either illegal, embarrassing or both.

Last Friday’s “incident” in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh went viral thanks to multiple cameras and smartphones that focused on the soldier, on the child and on the Palestinian women.

The proliferation of lenses, of cameras constantly rolling, is the big difference between now and then. So keep those cameras rolling.

Keep sharing on Facebook and Twitter to remind us all – Israelis, their friends overseas, and the world at large – how devastatingly destructive the occupation is for Palestinians and Israelis alike.

By doing so, you are taking part in what may be the best hope for change.

Palestinian girl biting an Israeli soldier trying to release her brother from the hand of the soldier in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh.

Pinterest
The girl bites the soldier, trying to release her brother. Photograph: Mohannad Darabee/Demotix/Corbis

Note: This is the same fearless blond girl, now 14, who brandished her fist to the Israeli soldier, a couple of years ago, who was trying to arrest her younger brother.

 

Biographies of a few existential nemesis to Palestinian people: Late Ben Gurion, Golda Meir and Arial Sharon (Part 1)

The Palestinian people were aware of the danger of Zionist settlement in Palestine since 1920, but they were railroaded with the peace rhetoric of the Zionist leaders, and waited for the next calamity to befall them.

In 1931, the Palestinian undertook a civil disobedience campaign against the British mandated power for denying them democratic elections, even in their towns and cities. This first Intifada lasted 3 years and England had to dispatch 100,000 troops to quell this mass uprising.

Nazi Germany learned and documented the horror torture techniques and methods adopted in Palestine by the British forces.

1. Golda Mabovitch Meyerson Meir was 5 when the Kiev pogrom broke out in 1902. Her elder sister Sheyna was already a Zionist and instilled this idea of the Promised Land (Palestine) in Golda.

At the age of 8, the family immigrated to the USA and settled in Milwaukee simply because the father Moshe got a job as carpenter in that city. Bluma is the mother.

She married Morris Meyerson who found work as calligraphist for shop signs and banners: He had hobbies in classical music, theater and literature.

In 1921, Golda dragged Morris with her to Palestine and started their adventure in the kibbutz Merhavia.  Why Golda re-immigrated to Palestine? She claimed that the Jewish philosopher during Jesus period had said:

“If I don’t agree with myself, who will do it?

If I only agree with myself, who am I?

If not now, then when?”

Golda moved to Jerusalem and had a son and a daughter before she joined the Histadrout located in Tel Aviv. Morris was forced to relocate again, against his wishes and the children were taken care of by nannies and Golda’s parents.

In Jerusalem, Golda used to purchase her goods from Palestinian shops and paid in coupons (Histadrout coupons?).

Once, a Palestinian fruit seller declined the coupons on the ground that it is becoming a huge pain to substitute them to real money, and that he had to pay commission to change them. Golda behaved as westerners usually do by leaving the coupons and moving on with the goods. The seller was unphased and chased her down the street and had the Palestinians and the British police block her advance.

The Jews in Palestine had a steady supporter of their “cause” by Major Orde Wingate, in charge of training only 500 Jews to be sent on missions of blowing bridges, setting explosives and disabling communication lines of the advancing German troops in Libya and Egypt.

Actually, Wingate trained far more than 500 soldiers, interpreting the order of training in batches of 500 since the British soldiers will be unable to recognize the particular Jews in training.

The Palestinian people were forbidden to be trained for fighting or of carrying arms.

In 1946, the British in Cyprus set up refugee camps for the Jews arriving from Europe. Golda was dispatched by Ben Gurion to strike a deal with Sir Stuart Ross. And Golda was able to repatriate all the kids less than one year old with their families, on the ground that the babies would die during the winter.

In Nov. 29, 1047, the UN voted to establishing two States for the Palestinians and the Jews.

Unfortunately, the declaration gave the minority Jews (less than 40%) over 56% of the land.

And the Palestinians refused this unfair deal and started a campaign of harassment.

The deal also promised the evacuation of the British troops within 6 months and the two sides prepared for armed uprising.

Ben Gurion needed $25 million to war preparation and Golda demanded a vote on who should go to the US in order to amass such a sum of money from the Jews. The members in the meeting voted for Golda instead of Ben Gurion. Her campaign in most US cities generated over $50 million, a sum that shifted the balance in weapons quality.

Golda was appointed Labor minister for a decade and then Ben Gurion appointed her minister of Foreign Affairs as Moshe Sharret decided to leave his ministry in order to lead the Labor Party. Ben Gurion asked Golda to change her name to the Hebew “Meir” (the illuminated) for her new assignment.

Prime minister Eshkol asked her to lead the Labor Party in 1967. When Eshkol suddenly died in 1969, the Knesset elected Golda as prime Minister.

During the 1973 war, Golda called her ambassador Simha Dinitz in Washington DC and ordered him to demand an immediate aerial bridge for all kinds of weapons which allowed Israel to re-occupy the Syrian Golan Heights and the Sinai.

Golda was re-elected for another term of 4 years, but her cancer forced her to resign and died at the age of 78.

2. Ariel Scheinermann Sharon “Arik” (The Lion)

Born in 1928 from parents (Samuel and Vera) who immigrated from Eastern Europe  and settled in a kibbutz in the Galilee valley called Sharon.

Vera had the ambition of becoming a physician but worked the land and the farm instead.  She lived to be 98 and died in 1988. Every evening at 6 pm, Ariel would call her and she never forgot to remind her son “Never trust the word of the Arab”, meaning the Palestinian. That was the advice that the Palestinians should have known “Never trust the word of the Jews in Palestine

Sharon joined the Haganah at the age of 14 and he became famous in Israel by the age of 25 following his savage campaigns against the Palestinians civilians and frequent massacres on villages.

He was nominated commander of the 890th battalion in 1953 and his violent and unstable character denied him any chance to become Army chief. He settled on political positions such as Minister of Defense during Lebanon invasion of 1982 and then Prime Minister in 2001.

He ordered the evacuation of the few Jewish settlements in Gaza in 2005.

Sharon married Margalit (Gali) who died in 1962 from a car accident.He also lost his son Gour in 1967 at the age of 11. He has two sons from Lily: Omri and Gilad.

He married her sister Lily who died of cancer in 2000 at the age of 63.

It was Lily who incited Sharon to purchase the ranch The Sycamores (400 hectares) in 1973 by the Negev.

Yasser Arafat sent Sharon a telegram of condolence knowing how much Lily meant to Ariel. In response, when Arafat died from poison in Nov. 2004, Sharon watched the burial ceremony on TV and commented to his son Gilad “A normal people would not waste an entire day participating in the mourning of this Dog

Mind you that Ariel Sharon is a Rabid Dog and war criminal who planned and executed the massacres in the Palestinian camps of Sabra and Chatila in 1982. There were no Palestinian fighters since they were evacuated by sea from Beirut a couple of moths previously. Over 3,000 civilians, mostly babies, women and elderly were slaughtered for three nights and two days.

Ariel Sharon had said: “I dedicated my life to extend the existence of Israel for another 30 years. Neither me, my sons or my grandsons will ever witness peace

Sharon died on Jan.4, 2014 after remaining in coma since 2005. For a stature of 1.70 m, Sharon weighted 147 kilos when he was wracked by a second hemorrhagic brain attack.

3. The worst nemesis to the Palestinian people was David Ben Gurion. He lead the Labor Party and instituted the Haganah and planned for a decade the genocide on selected Palestinian villages and towns: The plans were executed after he declared the independence of Israel in 1948.  The purpose was to frighten the Palestinians to vacate their towns and occupy strategic locations during the two wars for “Independence”

In May 1939, four months before WWII, England “White Paper” was read in the presence of David Ben Gurion during a meeting in the Histadrout. It stated:

1. It is not in England current policy to establish a Jewish State in Palestine.

2. As of today, the Jews will only retain 5% of the land in Palestine.

3. Immigration of Jews will be restricted to 15,000 a year for the coming 5 years.

4. Afterwards, no Jews will be permitted to immigrate without the prior agreement with the “Arabic” authorities.

Ben Gurion said in the meeting: “We will fight the White Paper as if Hitler didn’t exist. And we will fight Hitler as if the White Paper didn’t exist

Consequently, the Haganah (the armed faction of the Zionists) was to resume the immigration under the nose of the British navy.

Ben Gurion remained Prime Minister until he got too old to govern.

“Imagined Masculinity”, edited by Mai Ghoussoub and Emma Sinclair-Webb

March 1st, 2007 

I have read three chapters of “Imagined Masculinities”.

One of the chapters written by the Turkish Jew Moris Farhi is funny.  The kids Moris and his friend Selim, used to accompany his family Armenian servant Sofia to a Turkish bath called “Paradise”.  The manageress Teyze hanim (Lady Aunt) allowed the two kids to bath with the females because their testicles did not yet drop off; the kids heard this chit chatting and started to continuously checking their testicles and wondering when they might drop off; they roamed the streets looking for any pairs of testicles in case theirs might drop off and attach the found ones.

The kids heard a lot of myths told by Gypsy kids about female genitals and breasts and would surreptitiously investigate the category of women in the “hammam” through seemingly closed eyes. The kids would try to discriminate the temperament and emotional sexual performance of women according to the size of the aureole of the breast, the shape and elasticity of the labia and the size of the clitoris, sesame, or lentil, or chick-peas and whether the pubic hair is shaved daily (a status of riches) or occasionally.

 Chapter 2: Hassan Daoud on moustaches.  It appears that in older times, village leaders instituted various styles of moustaches depending on ranks and nobility; whomever wore moustaches not adequate to his rank was forced to shave them; thus, when a person used to leave a single hair from his moustaches as a guarantee for a loan, the lender would know the capacity of this fellow to repaying his loan.

The Lebanese army used to, or still is, allocate a monthly stipend for soldiers with appropriate moustaches as large as for any additional child he had.  I can generate two plausible hypotheses for this practice in our army:

First hypothesis: Emir Majeed Erslan was the defense minister most of his life since our independence and he wore these fine but ridiculous moustaches that circled upward and would swear on his moustaches; I guess he might have induced the army to encourage the officers and soldiers to carry these moustaches so that he would not be laughed at or mocked by the new generation of Lebanese.

The second hypothesis is that our army is a carbon copy of the French colonial army in structure. laws and behavior; I guess the republican French army held to the standards of the elite Napoleonic “grognards”, who were selected among the most hairy and owe-inspiring virility of their large moustaches, among other factors.

            Now, why moustaches are no longer a la mode? Pick and chose one or several of these reason:

First, women don’t like moustaches because they rub roughly their skins, they send the implicit message that the man is not interested enough to beautify his looks to please them and insist on the virility value of moustaches, or because the upper lip would cease to look like the man version of pudendum when shaved;

Second reason: after our many defeats with Israel we are no longer fond of imitating our valorous grandfathers; well, may be after the Hezbollah victory we might experience a resurgence of the moustaches, hopefully left unkept and wild; or

Third reason: Nose mucus sometimes stick to moustaches along with food and other sticky materials and finger-pointing to these humiliating debris can destroy the resemblance of virility; or because the Mullahs, and religious men are no longer appetizing for the modern generations and they need to remove that visible aberration; or because the modern sharp and safe razors, manual or electric, provided the adequate leverage for fashion alternatives.

Chapter on circumcision: The Tunisian Abdelwahab Bouhdiba wrote a chapter on circumcision. Nothing in the Koran, what the Prophet Mohamad admonished, states anything related to the need to get circumcised or “khitan“; it is Muslems and not Islam that imposed circumcision to the conquered people who opted to join Islam.

Even in the 3,000 pages of the “Fatawa Hindiyya” or the 2,000 pages of “Ihya” of Al-Ghazali the act of circumcision was never accorded a compulsory duty, barely a “sunna” act or strongly recommended.  Al-Ghazali recommended that circumcision of boys must not be done a week after he was born as the Jew did but after the boy’s head at least grew steady hair. The excision of girls was basically irrelevant and this act was demoted to at best a “makruma” or a pious act.

Clearly, circumcision is a tribal sign, a tattoo, for inclusion in the Muslim communities; like it is within the Jewish communities, although the Jew attached this act to the Torah in an attempt to create a tight tribal relationship.  In any case, circumcision has become the number one obligation among the Muslims and festivities of violence accompany these events; the ceremony is an almost a carbon copy to the ceremony of wedding and which could be interpreted as the preparation of the boy to matrimony, a few years earlier before the girl loses her virginity when the boy is married off.

The circumcision of a boy occurs when he is between 8 and 12 years old and the ceremony is accompanied by very loud noises to cover the crying and shouting of the victim.  The advantage of circumcision is to direct the boys away from lechery, and because the head of the penis becomes much less sensitive than the wife would enjoy a longer copulation time which she usually needs and wants. Actually, getting a hard on becomes mostly an act of good imagination and a willingness to please the mate.

The author Abdu Khal wrote a section about his circumcision ceremony (brit milah in Hebrew or the cutting according to the covenant) in the early forties in South Saudi Arabia close to the borders with Yemen. Abdu was to go on pilgrimage to Mecca with his grandmother because his dad has died and he was the only male in the family; thus, he was to be circumcised first.

Abdu was to dance all the way to the open place of the “makhatina” podium for the cutting of his foreskin (orla in Hebrew), accompanied by the “zaghareeds” of the women and loud noises, then he was to stand erect, akimbo, hands on his hips and looking far in the distance; he was not to blink or swoon or flinch “takhabbab” otherwise he will bring shame to the whole family as long as he lives.

Abdu proved to be a man and asked the circumciser to cut another slice in honor of his uncle and then another slice in honor of his mother.  His mother carried him away promptly in fear that he would mutilate himself for the whole tribe.  Abdu suffered three gruesome months from infections to the wounds which festered and spread to his testicles and could have died.

            The act of circumcision of the male boys (zhakar for male in both Arabic and Hebrew) seems to be a common ritual in nomadic tribes starting for hygiene reason and then taking on several structural and religious dimensions and interpretations like the prerequisite step toward learning.  The ancient Jews used to perform circumcision late and in mass ceremonies then they decided to have it the 8-day for the newly born.

My personal hypothesis is that during the captivity in Babylon or other dire circumstances that prohibited mass celebrations this act was transformed and made more confined in secrecy early on.  Thus, a more public ceremony consisted on the cutting of the hair at the age of three when the boys are taught the Torah and the religious doctrines. Since a woman should be kept close to her natural state and uncut, thus impure, then the boys should have something cut off, like pruning or grafting trees, so that they grow better, more knowledgeable and productive.

It appears that productivity is purely in terms of procreation since the male spend their life studying the religious doctrines and most of the work is done by the women, even earning the daily bread.

The haircutting ritual of Jewish boys at the age of three “halaka” as pronounced in Arabic was adopted from the Muslim rituals when families visited holy shrines; the Palestinian Jews (musta3rbim) spread this ritual which was primarily a Sephardic or Middle Eastern custom and the Kabala adopted it in the sixteenth century until it became widespread among the Jews in Israel.

Miron is a town near Safed where the shrine of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai is the target of the pilgrimage; the ear-locks are left intact and the rest of the head is shaved; time for the boys to start going to religious pre-schools “heyder”, wear the four-cornered undergarment, recite the Jewish statement of faith (Shema Yisrael) and accompany his father to the synagogue.

Theoretically, the boy who looked like a girl with curly hair now looks like his father “tsurat yehoudi“; the boy is now completely attached to his father, separated from the female sex, and oriented to acquiring the religious wisdom and knowledge.  It appears that during the early crusades in Medieval Europe the Jews were under pressure to convert to Christianity; the early indoctrination to Torah of the Jewish children was a counter response to inoculate the Jews from later pressures.

Chapter on Turkish manhod: “Our Bulen is now a Commando: Military service and manhood in Turkey” by Emma Sinclair-Webb is a chapter concerned with the military service rituals into manhood. Military service is another form of masculine initiation to manhood; in the poor counties the families and communities gather to celebrate the joining of the recruits in the military.  While the poor recruits might obtain advantages from military service in the form of health check ups, dental care and better nutrition, as well as an opportunity to get away from their restricted locality and in some cases to learn to read and write, the extension of the military service to over a year and a half has very negative impact.

The first few months are pure trauma of experiencing constant curses, contempt and punishments designed to erase any residual personality or individuality, to empty the mind and feelings, shaping the recruits into the single mould prepared by the militaristic dogma.  The recruits are made to lose their self-confidence by encouraging alienation and mistrust among themselves and that they cannot do anything correctly without the superior commander direction and control.

The recruits are given names that express their insignificance in most armies such as “Tommy soldiers” or “Mehmetcik” (Little Mehmet); the connotations are that the recruits are uncomplicated “chap” from the lower orders in the social structure constituted by the officers, ready to “perform any act of self-sacrifice without bating an eyelid”.

The recruits are invariably schooled at feeling infantile or at best children, forming the backbone of the army but nevertheless much less than the heroic “real men” or soldiers or officers.  In most countries, in addition to prison terms, dodgers of the military service are ostracized from society; they cannot find a job, or vote, or obtain passports or leave the country; in many instance they cannot marry because of the taboo attached to their lack of masculinity or responsibility to care for a family.

In wars, over 40% of the recruits are sent to the riskiest zones to fight internal or external enemies; if a recruit dies he is labeled a martyr or “shahid” and if he is crippled or traumatized then he receives much less health care than what a regular soldier receives in hospital facilities or psychiatric treatment.

            I will try to summarize a chapter in “Imagined masculinities” titled “Male gender and rituals of resistance in the Palestinian Intifada a cultural politics of violence” by Julie Petite.  Of the four years of the first Intifada beginning in December 1987 through 1990, an estimated 106,000 Palestinians were injured.  If we count the beatings this estimate could reach the number of over 200,000 or 10% of the total population of the Palestinians living under the Zionist occupation.

Most of these injured Palestinians are youth under the age of twelve or more than 60% of the youth passed through beatings and methodical investigation and incarceration.  Anton Shammas wrote in 1988: “For twenty years now, officially there has been no childhood in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.  A 10-year-old child shot by the Israeli military forces is reported to be a young man of ten'”

            The Palestinians consider the Israeli soldiers as cowards and devoid of any sense of honor and for good reason. When you challenge someone you pick the one able to taking up the challenge; otherwise there is no honor in the challenge.  When the Israeli soldiers challenge the unarmed Palestinian youth the repost do not take place, there is no challenge and the encounter degenerates into mere aggression.  Such aggression deprives the Israeli practitioners to claims of honor and morality; the Israeli soldier is thus considered as lacking in the emotional and moral quality of manhood.

            Most of the incarcerated youth return home and supplant their fathers in the family hierarchy and are called on the mediate disputes and lead the neighborhood politically and organizationally.  The unconcerned and apathetic youth is transformed after the beating and interrogations into an active underground member and who had the opportunity to receive education during his prison term by the educated Palestinian prisoners.

It is normal that family violence increases after the release of the Palestinian prisoners and the females take the brunt of the outburst, especially lately when the Israelis reverted into focusing on the sexual maltreatment of prisoners with the adverse consequences on the prisoners and his family after his release.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

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