Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Francis Scott Key

Tidbits #46

How many times should you look up to the sky, before you observe that you don’t own the universe?

How many should die of famine before local agriculture are made priority in investment?

Up to 20% of Africa’s debt is owed to China, what amount to about $2 trillion.

There are 4 national anthems without official lyrics. Spain has argued over which words to add for years.

I wish all national Anthem cover basic rights of humanity and kindness. Thw world will be much better instructed with repeated singing of a great anthem

What composer Francis Scott Key meant in “no refuge” in the “land of the free” in “The Star-Spangled Banner”?  The British in the battles that inspired “The Star-Spangled Banner” rescued 6,000 slaves from the US colonials.

Is a reflected cruelty the one unpardonable sin? What if this predetermined cruelty was a response to a prolonged reflective cruelty of the other person or a group of people? Wouldn’t that cruelty be considered a self-defence legitimate reaction?

The public reckoning for police use of facial recognition software. On Monday, IBM disavowed the technology entirely and CEO Arvind Krishna condemned its use “by other vendors, for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms.” Amazon responded Wednesday by putting a one-year moratorium on police use of its Rekognition software, closely followed by Microsoft’s promise not to sell the technology to US police.

The main difference between human genders is: After sex, the male’s mind is blank, while the female’s is overcrowded. If the female fails to prime the silence with an opinion, without any questions, the conversation is declined. And you have people claiming that it is Not the woman who generates the ideas. I deduce that people who are denied sex, their opinions are Not shared and go unnoticed.

This useless cruel pride of America and worst, the predetermined mind to inflict cruelty for a sick unbounded ego of superiority, even when living a wretched life in isolated and desolate corners in their land.

We are trained to become racist: by the family, the community and schools. On devient racist: la famille et la communauté’ nous ont coupe’ les ponts. Et l’école n’est pas mieux avec son enseignement tacit. Comment peut-on communiquer si les questions fondamentales ne sont pas pose’ pour réfléchir dessus?

5 facts we have to contend with: Climate change, frequent recurring deadly viruses, tougher resistant bacteria to antibiotics, degraded air quality, degraded potable water quality. Either we fight back or we adapt.

3/4 of babies born by sterilized caesarean surgery have high risks for allergies and asthma: The natural bacteria received from natural birth are lacking, such as lactobacilli and womb germs, especially if they don’t sucks their mom’s milk or are severed prematurely. It is like they were Not immersed in the magical potion at birth. Babies can become adult in intestine bacteria flora at the age of 3.

There are at least 3 different kinds of intestine in predominance of bacteria or enterotypes:

1. Bacteroides that produce plenty of biotin (B7 or B8 or H) which the foetus consume a lot and are dedicated to carnivorous specimen

2. Prevotella that produce vitamin B1 or thiamine that is used mainly by the brain, The lack of it generate beriberi (deficiency in movement)

3. Ruminococcus that manufacture blood through the heme. Each of these families of bacteria have common characteristics for splitting the food, manufacturing substances and neutralizing varieties of toxin.

Kids observe their parents: if the parents behave according to humanity standards and are active in confronting social unfair and Not equitable behaviors, they raise themselves accordingly. Actions of parents translate into positive peer pressures at school.

Is US National Anthem Celebrating Slavery?

No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Aug. 28 2016
Before a preseason game on Friday, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

When he explained why, he only spoke about the present: “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. … There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”Twitter then went predictably nuts, with at least one 49ers fan burning Kaepernick’s jersey.

Almost no one seems to be aware that even if the U.S. were a perfect country today, it would be bizarre to expect African-American players to stand for “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Why?

Because it literally celebrates the murder of African-Americans.

Few people know this because we only ever sing the first verse.

But read the end of the third verse and you’ll see why “The Star-Spangled Banner” is not just a musical atrocity, it’s an intellectual and moral one, too:

No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

“The Star-Spangled Banner,” Americans hazily remember, was written by Francis Scott Key about the Battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore during the War of 1812. But we don’t ever talk about how the War of 1812 was a war of aggression that began with an attempt by the U.S. to grab Canada from the British Empire.

However, we’d wildly overestimated the strength of the U.S. military.

By the time of the Battle of Fort McHenry in 1814, the British had counterattacked and overrun Washington, D.C., setting fire to the White House.

And one of the key tactics behind the British military’s success was its active recruitment of American slaves.

As a detailed 2014 article in Harper’s explains, the orders given to the Royal Navy’s Admiral Sir George Cockburn read:

Let the landings you make be more for the protection of the desertion of the Black Population than with a view to any other advantage. …

The great point to be attained is the cordial Support of the Black population. With them properly armed & backed with 20,000 British Troops, Mr. Madison will be hurled from his throne.

Whole families found their way to the ships of the British, who accepted everyone and pledged no one would be given back to their “owners.”

Adult men were trained to create a regiment called the Colonial Marines, who participated in many of the most important battles, including the August 1814 raid on Washington.

Then on the night of September 13, 1814, the British bombarded Fort McHenry.

Key, seeing the fort’s flag the next morning, was inspired to write the lyrics for “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

So when Key penned “No refuge could save the hireling and slave / From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,” he was taking great satisfaction in the death of slaves who’d freed themselves. His perspective may have been affected by the fact he owned several slaves himself.

With that in mind, think again about the next two lines: “And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave / O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

The reality is that there were human beings fighting for freedom with incredible bravery during the War of 1812. However, “The Star-Spangled Banner” glorifies America’s “triumph” over them — and then turns that reality completely upside down, transforming their killers into the courageous freedom fighters.

After the U.S. and the British signed a peace treaty at the end of 1814, the U.S. government demanded the return of American “property,” which by that point numbered about 6,000 people. The British refused.

Most of the 6,000 eventually settled in Canada, with some going to Trinidad, where their descendants are still known as “Merikins.”

If those leading the backlash against Kaepernick need more inspiration, they can get it from Francis Scott Key’s later life.

By 1833, Key was a district attorney for Washington, D.C.

As described in a book called Snowstorm in August by former Washington Post reporter Jefferson Morley, the police were notorious thieves, frequently stealing free blacks’ possessions with impunity.

One night, one of the constables tried to attack a woman who escaped and ran away — until she fell off a bridge across the Potomac and drowned.

“There is neither mercy nor justice for colored people in this district,” an abolitionist paper wrote. “No fuss or stir was made about it. She was got out of the river, and was buried, and there the matter ended.”

Key was furious and indicted the newspaper for intending “to injure, oppress, aggrieve & vilify the good name, fame, credit & reputation of the Magistrates & constables of Washington County.”

You can decide for yourself whether there’s some connection between what happened 200 years ago and what Colin Kaepernick is angry about today.

Maybe it’s all ancient, meaningless history.

Or maybe it’s not, and Kaepernick is right, and we really need a new national anthem.

Andrew Bossone shared this link

“So when Key penned “No refuge could save the hireling and slave / From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,” he was taking great satisfaction in the death of slaves who’d freed themselves. His perspective may have been affected by the fact he owned several slaves himself.”

No one seems to be aware that our national anthem literally celebrates the murder of African-Americans.
theintercept.com

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

July 2020
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