Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘garbage collection

Two negations don’t constitute a nation?

What if the list of these pairs is ridiculously long?

What if the political system is structure as Mafia organization and turfs? How “citizens” can institute a pseudo State?

Lebanon never managed to constitute a viable State, even if recognized by the UN in 1946, before Israel existed as a State.

On March 10, 1949, Georges Naccache, the Lebanese journalist and owner of the daily L’Orient, published his editorial stating that reaching a political consensus that Lebanon is neither a Western state Nor an Arabic state cannot be a viable basis to forming a nation.

Actually, this consensus was the consequence of two foreign negations relative to Lebanon:

1. The Christians realized that the West will never seriously consider Lebanon society and composition as anything close to western culture and civilization

2. The Moslems admitted that the larger and more populous Arabic States have no misgiving about Lebanon adopting Arabic culture and sticking to general Arabic political positions.

But the list of pairs of negations is very long, and most of them are not in the hand and possibilities of Lebanon to close the gap.

Actually the two halves of Lebanese communities (currently three parts) on each issue cannot fathom any commonality between themselves: It is hard to figured out any common grounds to unite the Lebanese on a single issue, political or otherwise.

For examples:

1. Lebanon is neither a Capitalist economic system Nor a Socialist.

Tiny Lebanon in size and population will never be capable to build any infrastructure that cater to a capitalistic system of production and exportation.

Whatever fortune a certain middle-class managed to accumulate before the civil war in 1975 (that lasted 13 years) was Not made by simple and straightforward transit exchange of goods and services from the West to the neighboring Arabic nations. It was the small added value in “packaging” the imported goods before re-shipping them.

Currently, and for the last 2 decades, the political system catered to the Gulf Emirates and Saudi real estates development in Beirut. The Downtown of Beirut and its seashore are no longer accessible to the common people.

In any case, not a single political party in Lebanon, even the oldest communist party formed in 1920’s, believes that the caste system of Lebanon will consider any kinds of socialist ideology.

2. Lebanon is neither a centralized state nor a decentralized institution.

Actually, even the most basic of decisions (relative to municipality responsibilities) has to be taken by consensus in the government. And the decisions executed by the militia leaders of each sectarian canton.

The central government collect the dues of the municipalities and refuse to relinquish them back. In the last two decades, the municipalities dues in the $billions have vanished in the pockets of the militia leaders.

Garbage collection and management was handled as the Italian mafia did 2 decades ago. Our mafia is the government and the Parliament themselves.

3. Lebanon has neither and independent legal system nor a totally submissive justice system in the hands of the politicians.

By the constitution, the legal system is the 3rd separate power in the land. Experiences have demonstrated that justice is a phone call away by any politician.

4. Lebanon is neither pan-Arabic nor an Islamic caliphate.

Many Sunnis are rallying to this notion of Islamic caliphate that was upheld by Daesh or ISIS. This reaction was brought by the failure of Egypt Gamal Abdel Nasser of realizing a sustainable pan-Arabic reality.

The Shi3a of Iran have their Wilayat Fakih.

The Shi3a of Iraq have their Murshed Ayatollah Sistani

India has the largest Shi3a-kind of believers way over 200 million due to the Mogul occupation who revered the direct descendants of the Prophet Muhammad

5. Lebanon is neither a State-owned nor a totally privatised economic system.

In the last 2 decades, the system has been doing its best to bankrupt all the profitable publicly owned enterprises in order to buy them cheap for the militia-run private parties.

The Lebanese are forced to pay twice for electricity, water and every basic facility: Once for the State and once for the private providers owned by the militia mafia organizations

6. Lebanon is neither with Hezbollah for national resistance to Israel nor with Saudi Arabia for allying with the enemy.

7. Lebanon was neither with the PLO (Palestinian Liberation Organization) nor with Syria of Hafez Assad

8. Lebanon is neither a strong bureaucracy nor a weak one…

The bureaucracy in Lebanon is meant to bribe the public servants so that the citizens pay for what the State should be doing. Bribery and corruption at all levels and in all the institutions in order to have a simple lousy transaction be stamped.

9. Lebanon is neither a democracy nor a pseudo democracy.

Lebanon is ruled by 19 officially recognized religious sects who have the responsibility of keeping track of the citizen private status from birth to death.

Since 1946, Lebanon failed to institute a valid State to all its citizens.

And diplomats wants the world to believe that our political system is a very stable one and immune to radical extremism.

Brown spills, sewage dump…: Beirut, Na3meh, Khaldeh…

For over 15 years, Sukleen (one of the Hariri clan company) has been renewing its contract with the government without bidding procedures and used open air dumps for its garbage collection enterprise.

Sukleen has been charging the municipalities $140 a ton of garbage and paid directly from the municipality fund (like taxes on payrolls), while the few private providers allowed to work and independent municipalities with their own system are paying $40 a ton.

Saida had amassed a hill of garbage and the municipality is fooling us that this hill will become a green garden for the citizens, eventually.  With potential perspectives and architectural plans… to back it up.

In Na3meh, the people have been suffering from increased cancer problems, living in an environment of constant stench. They endeavored to sit-in and prevent any more trucks to empty garbage.  The government has again promised to resolve this problem within two years...

Brown spills of Khalde

It’s a nasty sewage dump- mainly flowing from southern Beirut, Khaldeh and the suburbs like Aramoun/Bchamoun/Choueifat…

Noticed most of your recent posts have to do with that short trip you took to Jordan- best way to learn about Lebanon is to leave it for a few days every couple of weeks- refreshes your perspective

In addition to the landfill crisis on Beirut’s streets–covered on this blog yesterday— there appears to be a heavy dose of brown stuff spewing into the Mediterranean near Beirut Airport, as seen in these pictures I took a couple of days ago.
You can see the runway at the top right. And the output point appears to be near a sea resort near Khalde, a few hundred meters before the Ouzai tunnel running underneath the tarmac.
Zooming in on the same area in Google Maps, the brown substance appears to come from very close to this resort, near a green area, before being flushed out to sea via a short canal:
Zoom out and you can see the extent of the damage across the coastline:

But these satellite images could be quite dated– in some parts of Beirut I have noticed Google earth images to be 2-3 years old.

Judging by my current airplane window shots, could this mean that the slime has been pumped out constantly for 3 years or even much longer?
No wonder Sidon and Khalde are not safe places to swim.

En reponse a M Nehmat Frem ce soir sur telelumiere qui a specule qu'uniquement 15% des libanais seraient capables de trier leurs dechets, j'aimerais preciser qu'entre les annees 1996 et 1998 les habitants de Bsharri furent les habitants du premier village au Liban a trier leurs dechets a la source (c.a.d chacun dans sa maison). En effet environ 80 % des habitants avaient participe au tri des dechets organise par le Comite de Sauvergarde de l'Environnement de Bsharri, projet que la municipalite de Bsharri avait malheureusement refuse de reprendre lors de sa reprise de pouvoir en 1998. Avec de la bonne volonte, de la patience et du courage, rien n'est impossible M. Frem.
In response to Ne3mat Frem who speculated that only 15% of Lebanese (meaning municipalities, baladiyat?) are able to sort out their garbage… I would like to remind M Frem that between 1996-98 the citizens of the town of Bsharreh were the first to sort out their garbage at the source, their homes.
Indeed, 80% of the inhabitants participated in the project Safeguarding the Environment Committee. Unfortunately, the next municipality refused to take up that project.
With will, patience and courage, nothing is impossible.
The French text posted by Habib Rahmet:
En reponse a M Nehmat Frem ce soir sur telelumiere qui a specule qu’uniquement 15% des libanais seraient capables de trier leurs dechets, j’aimerais preciser qu’entre les annees 1996 et 1998 les habitants de Bsharri furent les habitants du premier village au Liban a trier leurs dechets a la source (c.a.d chacun dans sa maison). En effet environ 80 % des habitants avaient participe au tri des dechets organise par le Comite de Sauvergarde de l’Environnement de Bsharri, projet que la municipalite de Bsharri avait malheureusement refuse de reprendre lors de sa reprise de pouvoir en 1998. Avec de la bonne volonte, de la patience et du courage, rien n’est impossible M. Frem.

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

July 2020
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