Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘gender equality

Tidbits and Notes. Part 255

Note: My previous large file titled “Tidbits and notes. Part 211” has vanished after I pressed Leave instead of Cancel. The file has been saved several times, and wish at least the latest saving can be retrieved. Why do they have to use trick terms? Why instead of “Leave” and “cancel” they don’t use “Do Not save” and “Save”? And that “Leave” should erase the entire file instead of changing nothing? WordPress,com support system was of No help. If you know how I can retrieve the file, I’ll be very appreciative.

It turned out that Koran Never mentions Sharia “Shari3at”
It turned out that Koran Never believed in miracles
And the best way to get promoted is to learn something new and get good at it? In public sectors, the best behavior is to get expert in routine procedures?
Israel: the nastiest savage State that was created so far by the colonial powers
A report revealed details of the US-Saudi arms deal. Despite Trump’s repeated assertions that the $110 billion deal will mean 500,000 jobs, Lockheed Martin documents seen by Reuters predict that the deal, if it all comes together, would barely keep 18,000 existing US workers in jobs—but only create a few hundred new jobs in the country.
The dogma of the Cynic philosophical school is that happiness is learning to feel independent (detached) from external advantages such as material luxuries or political power. The Church of Rome coined the pejorative term “cynical” referring to individual who exhibits a sneering disbelief in human sincerity, with penchant insensitivity to people’ s plights: The Church was competing with all the Hellenistic schools of philosophy and religions.

Zeno dogma (stoicism) was that each individual is a complete microcosms reflected in the macrocosms.Cicero, the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Seneca were staunch stoics.

Seneca wrote “mankind is holy”; thus, considering individual dignity and well being as goal for improvement and care. The Roman Christian Church coined the connotation stoic for individuals who do not let their feeling take over.

The First dogma of the Epicureans was: Pleasurable results of an action is always counterbalanced with side effects that we need to mind of

The Neo-Platonist dogma: The immortal soul (concept of salvation) is the world of ideas that is illuminated by the One (or God), it is “a spark from the fire”.  The material world has no real existence until the light reaches it.

Plotinus experienced mystical moments of fusion with the world of spirit. The Roman Christian Church had a hard struggle with this powerfully competing school of Neo-Platonism and ended up adopting most of its concepts.

My view on life: the past is the partial derivative of a current event, and the future is the integration of the function of the present events. The big unknown is the Constant of the integration, coined the chaos that human behaviors effect on nature normal process. This constant can be evaluated by the proper measuring stick: health, economics, financial, social displacement, or quality of life.

Washington has reportedly(paywall) agreed to let 8 countries, including India, South Korea, and Japan, keep buying Iranian oil after sanctions begin.

The cost of breeding more humane chickens is almost nothing. A projected 1% increase in prices is a small one to pay to stop animal suffering.

 

Is gender equality good for everyone?

Privilege is invisible to those who have it?

I think that most women refuse to be equalled with men, unless for equal pay

It’s the right thing to do. Michael Kimmel makes the practical case for treating men and women equally in the workplace and at home. It’s not a zero-sum game, but a win-win that will result in more opportunity and more happiness for everybody.

Michael Kimmel. Sociologist. Author of “Angry White Men,” Michael Kimmel is a pre-eminent scholar of men and masculinity. Full bio

Speech on May 2015

I’m here to recruit men to support gender equality.

What do men have to do with gender equality? Gender equality is about women, right? I mean, the word gender is about women. Actually, I’m even here speaking as a middle class white man.

I wasn’t always a middle class white man. It all happened for me about 30 years ago when I was in graduate school, and a bunch of us graduate students got together one day, and we said there’s an explosion of writing and thinking in feminist theory, but there’s no courses yet.

So we did what graduate students typically do in a situation like that. We said, OK, let’s have a study group. We’ll read a text, we’ll talk about it, we’ll have a potluck dinner. 

TED

“White men in Europe and the United States are the beneficiaries of the single greatest affirmative action program in the history of the world. It is called ‘the history of the world.'”

1:07 So every week, 11 women and me got together.

We would read some text in feminist theory and have a conversation about it. And during one of our conversations, I witnessed an interaction that changed my life forever.

It was a conversation between two women. One of the women was white, and one was black. And the white woman said “All women face the same oppression as women. All women are similarly situated in patriarchy, and therefore all women have a kind of intuitive solidarity or sisterhood.”

And the black woman said, “I’m not so sure. Let me ask you a question.When you wake up in the morning and you look in the mirror, what do you see? And the white woman said, “I see a woman.” And the black woman said, “You see, that’s the problem for me. Because when I wake up in the morning and I look in the mirror I see a black woman. To me, race is visible. But to you, race is invisible. You don’t see it.”

And then she said something really startling. She said, “That’s how privilege works. Privilege is invisible to those who have it.” It is a luxury, I will say to the white people sitting in this room, not to have to think about race every split second of our lives. Privilege is invisible to those who have it.

Now remember, I was the only man in this group, so when I witnessed this, I went, “Oh no.”

And somebody said, “Well what was that reaction?” And I said, “Well, when I wake up in the morning and I look in the mirror, I see a human being. I’m kind of the generic person. You know, I’m a middle class white man. I have no race, no class, no gender. I’m universally generalizable.”

3:02 (Laughter)

I like to think that was the moment I became a middle class white man, that class and race and gender were not about other people, they were about me. I had to start thinking about them, and it had been privilege that had kept it invisible to me for so long.

I wish I could tell you this story ends 30 years ago in that little discussion group, but I was reminded of it quite recently at my university where I teach.

I have a colleague, and she and I both teach the sociology of gender course on alternate semesters. So she gives a guest lecture for me when I teach. I give a guest lecture for her when she teaches. So I walk into her class to give a guest lecture, about 300 students in the room, and as I walk in, one of the students looks up and says, Oh, finally, an objective opinion.”

All that semester, whenever my colleague opened her mouth, what my students saw was a woman. I mean, if you were to say to my students, “There is structural inequality based on gender in the United States,” they’d say, “Well of course you’d say that. You’re a woman. You’re biased.” When I say it, they go, “Wow, is that interesting. Is that going to be on the test? How do you spell ‘structural’?”

I hope you all can see, this is what objectivity looks like.

Disembodied Western rationality. And that, by the way, is why I think men so often wear ties.

Because if you are going to embody disembodied Western rationality, you need a signifier, and what could be a better signifier of disembodied Western rationality than a garment that at one end is a noose and the other end points to the genitals?

That is mind-body dualism right there.

So making gender visible to men is the first step to engaging men to support gender equality.

when men first hear about gender equality, many men think that’s right, that’s fair, that’s just, that’s the ethical imperative. But not all men.

Some men think “Oh my God, yes, gender equality,” and they will immediately begin to mansplain to you your oppression. They see supporting gender equality something akin to the cavalry, like, “Thanks very much for bringing this to our attention, ladies, we’ll take it from here.”

This results in a syndrome that I like to call ‘premature self-congratulation.’

There’s another group, though, that actively resists gender equality, that sees gender equality as something that is detrimental to men. I was on a TV talk show opposite four white men.

This is the beginning of the book I wrote, ‘Angry White Men.’ These were four angry white men who believed that they, white men in America, were the victims of reverse discrimination in the workplace.

And they all told stories about how they were qualified for jobs, qualified for promotions, they didn’t get them, they were really angry. And the reason I’m telling you this is I want you to hear the title of this particular show. It was a quote from one of the men, and the quote was, A Black Woman Stole My Job.”

And they all told their stories, qualified for jobs, qualified for promotions, didn’t get it, really angry. And then it was my turn to speak, and I said, “I have just one question for you guys, and it’s about the title of the show, ‘A Black Woman Stole My Job.’

Actually, it’s about one word in the title. I want to know about the word ‘my.’ Where did you get the idea it was your job? Why isn’t the title of the show, ‘A Black Woman Got the Job?’ or ‘A Black Woman Got A Job?'”

Because without confronting men’s sense of entitlement, I don’t think we’ll ever understand why so many men resist gender equality.

we think this is a level playing field, so any policy that tilts it even a little bit, we think, “Oh my God, water’s rushing uphill. It’s reverse discrimination against us.”

 let me be very clear: white men in Europe and the United States are the beneficiaries of the single greatest affirmative action program in the history of the world. It is called “the history of the world.”

now I’ve established some of the obstacles to engaging men, but why should we support gender equality? Of course, it’s fair, it’s right and it’s just. But more than that, gender equality is also in our interest as men.

If you listen to what men say about what they want in their lives, gender equality is actually a way for us to get the lives we want to live.

Gender equality is good for countries. It turns out, according to most studies, that those countries that are the most gender equal are also the countries that score highest on the happiness scale. And that’s not just because they’re all in Europe.

Even within Europe, those countries that are more gender equal also have the highest levels of happiness.

It is also good for companies. Research by Catalyst and others has shown conclusively that the more gender-equal companies are, the better it is for workers, the happier their labor force is.

They have lower job turnover. They have lower levels of attrition. They have an easier time recruiting. They have higher rates of retention, higher job satisfaction, higher rates of productivity.

So the question I’m often asked in companies is, “Boy, this gender equality thing, that’s really going to be expensive, huh?” And I say, “Oh no, in fact, what you have to start calculating is how much gender inequality is already costing you. It is extremely expensive.” So it is good for business.

And the other thing is, it’s good for men. It is good for the kind of lives we want to live, because young men especially have changed enormously, and they want to have lives that are animated by terrific relationships with their children. They expect their partners, their spouses, their wives, to work outside the home and be just as committed to their careers as they are.

I was talking, to give you an illustration of this change — Some of you may remember this. When I was a lot younger, there was a riddle that was posed to us. Some of you may wince to remember this riddle. This riddle went something like this.

A man and his son are driving on the freeway, and they’re in a terrible accident, and the father is killed, and the son is brought to the hospital emergency room, and as they’re bringing the son into the hospital emergency room, the emergency room attending physician sees the boy and says, Oh, I can’t treat him, that’s my son.” How is this possible?

We were flummoxed by this. We could not figure this out.

 Well, I decided to do a little experiment with my 16-year old son. He had a bunch of his friends hanging out at the house watching a game on TV recently. So I decided I would pose this riddle to them, just to see, to gauge the level of change.

Well, 16-year-old boys, they immediately turned to me and said, “It’s his mom.” Right? No problem. Just like that. Except for my son, who said, “Well, he could have two dads.”

That’s an index, an indicator of how things have changed. Younger men today expect to be able to balance work and family. They want to be dual-career, dual-carer couples. They want to be able to balance work and family with their partners. They want to be involved fathers.

11:36 Now, it turns out that the more egalitarian our relationships, the happier both partners are. Data from psychologists and sociologists are quite persuasive here. I think we have the persuasive numbers, the data, to prove to men that gender equality is not a zero-sum game, but a win-win.

Here’s what the data show. Now, when men begin the process of engaging with balancing work and family, we often have two phrases that we use to describe what we do. We pitch in and we help out.

And I’m going to propose something a little bit more radical, one word: “share.”

Because here’s what the data show: when men share housework and childcare, their children do better in school. Their children have lower rates of absenteeism, higher rates of achievement. They are less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. They are less likely to see a child psychiatrist. They are less likely to be put on medication.

So when men share housework and childcare, their children are happier and healthier, and men want this.

When men share housework and childcare, their wives are happier. Duh. Not only that, their wives are healthier. Their wives are less likely to see a therapist, less likely to be diagnosed with depression, less likely to be put on medication, more likely to go to the gym, report higher levels of marital satisfaction.

when men share housework and childcare, their wives are happier and healthier, and men certainly want this as well.

When men share housework and childcare, the men are healthier. They smoke less, drink less, take recreational drugs less often. They are less likely to go to the ER but more like to go to a doctor for routine screenings. They are less likely to see a therapist, less likely to be diagnosed with depression, less likely to be taking prescription medication. So when men share housework and childcare, the men are happier and healthier. And who wouldn’t want that?

And finally, when men share housework and childcare, they have more sex.

of these four fascinating findings, which one do you think Men’s Health magazine put on its cover?

 “Housework Makes Her Horny. (Not When She Does It.)”

14:04 (Laughter)

I will say, just to remind the men in the audience, these data were collected over a really long period of time, so I don’t want listeners to say, “Hmm, OK, I think I’ll do the dishes tonight.”

These data were collected over a really long period of time. But I think it shows something important, that when Men’s Health magazine put it on their cover, they also called, you’ll love this, “Choreplay.”

what we found is something really important, that gender equality is in the interest of countries, of companies, and of men, and their children and their partners, that gender equality is not a zero-sum game. It’s not a win-lose. It is a win-win for everyone.

And what we also know is we cannot fully empower women and girls unless we engage boys and men. We know this. And my position is that men need the very things that women have identified that they need to live the lives they say they want to live in order to live the lives that we say we want to live.

15:21 In 1915, on the eve of one of the great suffrage demonstrations down Fifth Avenue in New York City, a writer in New York wrote an article in a magazine, and the title of the article was, “Feminism for Men.” And this was the first line of that article: Feminism will make it possible for the first time for men to be free.”

 

3 Lebanese Women Make it to BBC’s 100 Women List: Who They Are

It’s almost painful to see 3 out of the 100 women on BBC’s 100 Women are Lebanese, when Lebanon ranked among the worst countries in terms of gender equality (135/142), check out BlogBaladi for more information on that report.

But, it’s also amazing that 3% of the BBC’s 100 Women list of 2014, are Lebanese. It’s also doubly amazing because one of them is a scientist, and a good friend, Hind Hobeika!

Hind Hobeika

hind_hobeika2I remember when Hind pitched her idea of goggles with sensors in them to monitor heart rate and other realtime data (as if you were on a treadmill) for the Stars of Science show on TV.

I remember how we all voted for her. I also remember a year later, sitting in a restaurant in San Francisco’s Market Street with another amazing Lebanese woman, Jessica Semaan, and finding out how Hind’s invention was ready to go into mass-production.

Now, Hind’s Instabeat goggles are poised to go on sale in 53 different countries around the world.

Proud of you Hind, words cannot begin to explain. Here’s a TED talk by Hind

Bahia Shehab

3723b538f9d86a88e9e5636d982ac6176622c879_254x191Bahia changed the entire meaning of the word “No” in Arabic, “لا”. No, and a thousand times no.

No is a very important word for an Arab in the past few years.

No to dictators. No to oppression. No to inequality. No to sexism. No to extremism.

Bahia’s work manifested itself on the walls of Cairo, and the series of “No”s became a regular fixture in Tahrir Square and other notable public spaces where they embodied the many horrifying incidents in Egypt’s tumultuous revolution and post-revolution troubles.

Remember the blue bra? Watch Bahia’s awesome TED talk to jog your memory.

Wall.JPG.scaled500

Bushra El Turk

Tala_Bushra_154nI adore classical music, especially ones with a twist. Bushra’s masterpieces are a trip in themselves, and while writing this, I’m listening to her website’s streaming music.

Often, my preoccupation with science and technology makes me forget for a second how important and powerful art can be, and for this Lebanese-Egyptian, it sounds pretty darn good.

Check out Bushra’s website to know more, and here’s a video of her work behind the scenes

Speech about feminism at the United Nations. Emma Watson: “The View of Feminism Is “Man Hating” Has To Stop”

“The more I spoke about feminism, the more I realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man hating,” Emma Watson said.

“If there is one thing I know for certain is that this has to stop.”

Watson, a U.N. Women Global Goodwill Ambassador, was in New York to launch “HeForShe,” a campaign for men and boys worldwide to advocate an end to gender inequality. She spoke frequently about the role men have in helping women and girls achieve equal rights, and said that liberating men from stereotypes ultimately benefits women.

Emma Watson delivered an inspiring speech about feminism at the United Nations Headquarters in New York yesterday, saying there is a need for more feminists in society and called on men to advocate gender equality.

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

In her speech, Watson described her decision to become a feminist as “uncomplicated,” but that she was shocked to find that society associated it with being “too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive.”

Near the end of her speech, Watson made a lighthearted reference to her Harry Potter fame by asking, “Why this Harry Potter girl? What is she doing at the U.N.?” — but she was quick to address the seriousness of her advocacy, saying, “All I know is that I care about this problem and I want to make this better. And having seen what I’ve seen and given the chance, I feel my responsibility to say something.”

You can watch Watson deliver the speech here:

youtube.com

The full transcript of her amazing speech can be read here:

Today we are launching a campaign called “HeForShe.”

I am reaching out to you because I need your help. We want to end gender inequality—and to do that we need everyone to be involved.

This is the first campaign of its kind at the UN: we want to try and galvanize as many men and boys as possible to be advocates for gender equality.

And we don’t just want to talk about it, but make sure it is tangible.

I was appointed six months ago and the more I have spoken about feminism the more I have realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating.

If there is one thing I know for certain, it is that this has to stop.
For the record, feminism by definition is: “The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.”

I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.

When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.

When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”

When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me.

But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word.
Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.

Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?

I am from Britain and think it is right that as a woman I am paid the same as my male counterparts.

I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body.

I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decision-making of my country.

I think it is right that socially I am afforded the same respect as men. But sadly I can say that there is no one country in the world where all women can expect to receive these rights.

No country in the world can yet say they have achieved gender equality.

These rights I consider to be human rights but I am one of the lucky ones. My life is a sheer privilege because my parents didn’t love me less because I was born a daughter.

My school did not limit me because I was a girl. My mentors didn’t assume I would go less far because I might give birth to a child one day.

These influencers were the gender equality ambassadors that made who I am today. They may not know it, but they are the inadvertent feminists who are.

And we need more of those. And if you still hate the word—it is not the word that is important but the idea and the ambition behind it.

Because not all women have been afforded the same rights that I have.

In fact, statistically, very few have been.

In 1997, Hilary Clinton made a famous speech in Beijing about women’s rights. Sadly many of the things she wanted to change are still a reality today.
But what stood out for me the most was that only 30% of her audience were male.

How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?

Men—I would like to take this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue too.

Because to date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society despite my needing his presence as a child as much as my mother’s.

I’ve seen young men suffering from mental illness unable to ask for help for fear it would make them look less “macho”—in fact in the UK suicide is the biggest killer of men between 20-49; eclipsing road accidents, cancer and coronary heart disease.

I’ve seen men made fragile and insecure by a distorted sense of what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality either.

We don’t often talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes but I can see that that they are and that when they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence.

If men don’t have to be aggressive in order to be accepted women won’t feel compelled to be submissive. If men don’t have to control, women won’t have to be controlled.

Both men and women should feel free to be sensitive.

Both men and women should feel free to be strong… It is time that we all perceive gender on a spectrum not as two opposing sets of ideals.

If we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by what we are—we can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom.

I want men to take up this mantle. So their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so that their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human too—reclaim those parts of themselves they abandoned and in doing so be a more true and complete version of themselves.

You might be thinking who is this Harry Potter girl? And what is she doing up on stage at the UN. It’s a good question and trust me I have been asking myself the same thing.

I don’t know if I am qualified to be here. All I know is that I care about this problem. And I want to make it better.

And having seen what I’ve seen—and given the chance—I feel it is my duty to say something.

English statesman Edmund Burke said: “All that is needed for the forces of evil to triumph is for enough good men and women to do nothing.”

In my nervousness for this speech and in my moments of doubt I’ve told myself firmly—if not me, who, if not now, when.

If you have similar doubts when opportunities are presented to you I hope those words might be helpful.

Because the reality is that if we do nothing it will take 75 years, or for me to be nearly a hundred before women can expect to be paid the same as men for the same work.

15.5 million girls will be married in the next 16 years as children.

And at current rates it won’t be until 2086 before all rural African girls will be able to receive a secondary education.
If you believe in equality, you might be one of those inadvertent feminists I spoke of earlier.

And for this I applaud you.

We are struggling for a uniting word but the good news is we have a uniting movement. It is called HeForShe.

I am inviting you to step forward, to be seen to speak up, To be the he for she. And to ask yourself if not me, who, if not now when.

Thank you.

Emma Watson Says That The View Feminism Is "Man Hating" Has To Stop

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