Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘George Sand

Mon cher Ado/Farouk. Part 33

Le rire mon, cher Farouk , est le remède universel !
Il m’arrive des fois , au cours de la nuit , de me réveiller en riant (c’est un cas que je dois experimenter. Tu croix que c’est normal quand on est encore jeune?).  C’est un bénéfice net d’impôts .

Souvent , ces derniers temps , je passe des moments agréables à rire , avec un copain , pour des sornettes (en Whatsup mode?). Je me rappelle du jour où , avec Marc , on avait ri , à gorges déployées , rien qu’en lisant les critiques de Charles Baudelaire sur l’auteur de ” La petite Fadette ” , celle qui fut la maîtresse de Musset, de Chopin , et de tant d’autres encore , la fameuse George Sand qu’il trouvait bien bête . (les betes n’ecrivent pas si bien et avec tant de candeur)

Allez savoir pourquoi ? Lui aurait-elle refusé quelques avances? (Peut-etre que Sand lui avait administre’ quelque claques?) Toujours est-il qu’il la jugeait ” bête et lourde “.

Et de rajouter ” qu’elle a la même délicatesse de sentiment que les concierges et les filles entretenues ” et enfin qu’il ne pouvait penser à ” cette stupide créature sans un certain frémissement d’horreur .” Un peu sévère , non ?

Et pourtant , je ris encore quand je pense au mordant de cette réflexion baudelairienne .

(Je ne sens pas le rire me venir avec cette grotestque reflection. Sand n’etait pas belle: son charactere gagnait a tout coup)

Lou Andreas-Salome by Francoise Giroud

Une histoire de femme libre

Loise, Loita, Lou Salome (1861-1937). She was compared to George Sand, half a century ago, for a free life style, though Sand had a richer gamut of emotions and engagement.

She could lead this kind of life because she received a monthly stipend from the Russian government due to her officer of a father.

Lou got close relationships with Nietzsche, Rainer Maria Rilke, Freud, Paul Ree, Heinrich Gillot, Zemek (Friedrich Pineless, a Danish neurologist who was 7 years younger)…

Before the age of 35, Lou never engaged in love making: She was anorexic, flat chested, and had probably bad experiences in physical contacts with her brothers and father (incest?).

After the age of 35, she got totally in sexual activities, mostly with younger men.

Zemek was the first man she shared sexual intercourse with and she confined to Ernst Pfeiffer at a late age: (Zemek) was the man she feels most ashamed of (the muddy routes of sensuality?)

She decided to marry Andreas, a professor of Oriental and Central languages at the university of Gottingen where she settle down till her death.

Each Spring, Lou would travel around Europe, tackled by Zemek, until he was sick and tired of carrying around her luggage while she had sweet eyes to the young boys.

She wrote: Natural love is based on the principle of infidelity (like many animals?)

Lou could Not dissociate love from spirituality: Sexual Love must be short and fugitive: Must be regenerated at each amorous fiesta.

She never had the courage to put in this world a human being: We had to be more than ourselves, a course of living that requires immense focus.

At the age of 50, she gets initiated to psycho-analysis around 1912.

She landed in Vienna in August 1912 in order to attend the Wednesday sessions of Freud disciples

Freud mentioned that that her stay in Vienna may have been the most exciting and fruitful period in her destiny.

Lou and Freud had frequent and lengthy correspondence for many years.  They started the trend of exchanging portraits.

She disagreed with Freud on the subject of narcissism.

She practiced psycho-analysis during and after the WWI in Russia and invested many hours treating soldiers of their trauma.

She adopted Marienchen, an illegitimate girl of her husband, and made her heritiere.

Her abundant correspondence and articles were Not translated from German. Such as “Anal und sexual, 1916”, “Creation of God”, My life, Love of narcissism, Eros.

Fenitchka and Rodinka were translated.

Lou might have destroyed many lives (men committing suicide, like Victor Tausk, Paul Ree…) and laid waste to many marriages, but her company was stimulating.

Men felt larger in her presence and she delivered them from their strong personality, though she was never delivered herself from her personality

Seduction Tales (June 9, 2009)

Are you an avid reader?  A few reminders of what you have read on seduction might be touching.

The French lady writer George Sand seduced the Venetian physician Pagello who was treating her sickly lover the poet Alfred de Musset by writing to him a series of questions such as:

“Would you be a master or a support?”

“Would you consol me of the suffering before I got to know you?”

“Would you understand why I am sad?”

“Do you know compassion, patience, and friendship?”

“Do you know that women have a soul even though you were raised to believe the contrary?”

“Would I be your companion or your slave?”

“Do you desire me or love me?”

“When you satisfy your passional urges would you thank me?”

“When I pleasure you would you tell me?”

“Do you know the soul desire that no human caress can numb or tire you?”

“When your lover sleeps in your arms do you keep awake gazing at her, praying and crying?”

“Does sex exhaust the moron in you or you are driven to divine ecstasy?”

“Does your soul survive to your body when you leave the bosom of your lover?”

The French novelist Stendhal fell in love with the divorced lady Mathilda.  He sent her letters such as:

“I know myself. I love you for the rest of my life.  Whatever you will do can never change the idea of you that stroke my soul; the idea of happiness of being loved by you; the idea that I have contempt for all that gave me pleasure without you.

I need you.  I am thirsty for you. I will give the rest of my life to have the luxury of talking with you of indifferent matters for just a quarter of an hour. I am leaving you to be present with you more frequently, to dare speak with you leisurely with al the energy and passion that devour me.”

Another one of Stendhal’s seductive letters reads:

“I have courage only when far from you. Close to you I am timid, like a boy as words expires on his lips; I just cannot resist but contemplating and admiring you.

Do I have to be reduced to an inferior state and as flat?  Love me Mathilda but never despise me. That agony is way above my forces.  I am afraid to displease you.”

Seduction is a patient and persistent act of proving generosity, attention to details in the loved one, and being “present” most of the time which is the best publicity for reminding the loved one that she can never feel lonely if she cares.

Seduction is a cultural phenomenon; warm and colorful environmental climate help a lot.

Did you visit the puritanical USA New England region or the northern cold part of Europe?  You might realize that seducing is an exceptionally rare occurrence there; people do not dare look at you frankly for fear of “losing control of the self” and of being caught unprepared.

Now visit Latin America, the non –Arab Africa, or the Philippines and you discover the dancing gait of people, the colorful dresses, and the generous genuine smiles.  The entire posture of the body, the gesture, and the gazing are seductive.

Seductive cultures show openness, readiness to please people they cross and meet, and openness for opinions and discussions; they act as if they are used to caressing and extending compassion.

It is such a fresh air to mix with cultured seduction.

Learn to seduce; abuse of seduction and let people feel appreciated, wanted, and desirable.

The simple generosity for pleasing others is the characteristic of genuine and confident people.

To seduce is to kill reality and to metamorphose into lure“.

Islam never neglected seduction; seducing in Islam used to be a culture of refinement; the process of knowing and learning how to seduce used to be part and parcel of constant discovering and an attitude of good behavior.

Love Tales (June 8, 2009)

The Moslem Caliph of Baghdad, Haroun Al Racheed, had expanded the Arab Empire to its apogee.  He still had insomnia thinking on the meaning and sensations of amorous passion; he wanted to learn more about love and desires, though he had all kinds of concubines.

Caliph Al Rasheed fell in love with his cousin Zubaida, and married her in 781, and she conserved her privilege in Haroun’s heart because of her intelligence and refinement.

The erudite Al Asmai described to the Caliph what love is:  “A light that illuminates the mind and permits life to vibrate through its radiation.”  Apparently, the caliph was satisfied enough to bestow a fortune to the interpreter.

Al Rasheed was the son of a powerful love affair between Caliph Al Mahdi and his concubine Khizarane whom he married.  The early caliphs liked to communicate with women more than with men: they had realize that women made the effort to increase knowledge in varieties of disciplines that Caliphs shared interest in such as poetry, playing musical instruments, medicine, theology, astronomy, and mathematics.

Ibn Hazm who lived in Andalusia (994-1064) was a prolific writer, scientist, statesman, and politician; he wrote the famous “Treatise of Love” which was translated in all kinds of languages and was the main source for Medieval Europe to educate their sentimental and chivalrous behaviors.

Have you ever fallen in love?  How do you know that someone is falling in love? Examples of Ibn Hazm description of falling in Love:

“When I get up to leave you, my gait resembles the one who is taken to be executed.  When I rejoin you, I hurry as the moon crosses the sky.  When I say good bye I am as slow as the fixed stars.”

When you move I follow you.   I take the same direction as yours as the chameleon trails after the sunshine. When you stop I contemplate you intently: the eye is the wide open door for the soul’s secrets.

When I speak to you I utter incongruities. I listen intently at anything you say, I am astonished of whatever you divulge to me, I acknowledge your opinions, and I believe your lies.”

“I feel sensational pleasure being squeezed with you in enclosed quarters.  I extend my hand toward the same object you desire to grab.  I love to drink from your same glass, where you placed your lips.  I am constantly aching to touch your hand and to lean on you.”

I am discovering that with you, what I loathed is gorgeous and colorful; what was hard is pretty easy to take and do.  My inert heart is burning amidst this storm.  I am ready to open up on my deepest secrets. If I had not met you I would have never known why my mother conceived me.”

The energy released by Eros is devastating and all consuming.  Falling in love is a transforming source of energy; it excites inert and dessicated hearts; it pacifies frenzied tendencies.

It is a bad sign when your lover acts normal when he meets with you or speaks evenly.  It is a bad omen when you realize that your lover has excellent appetite and is gaining weight.

Are you a man who likes mostly the company of men?

Are you a woman who likes mostly the company of women?

Then, most probably, you are seeking love in the wrong spheres of society.  Falling in love within the same gender is easier than facing the challenge of knowing a different type of love partner; routine communication is the sure way to killing a relationship.

Remember, in matter of feeling, an experienced man is twice better than a regular man; an experienced women is four times better than a novice girl.

Note: I translated many sections from the French manuscript “Love in the Moslem countries“. You may refer to my post “Seduction Tales” on how the French writer George Sand and the French novelist Stendhal describe “falling in love


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

September 2020
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