Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘German Lopez

After Sandy Hook we said never again.

And then we let 1,000 mass shootings happen.

Read the 11 facts about USA gun violence

More guns is highly correlated with more homicides, more suicides, more domestic violence

In December 2012, a gunman walked into Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, and killed 20 children, six adults, and himself. Since then, there have been at least 1,000 mass shootings, with shooters killing at least 1,140 people and wounding 3,942 more.

The counts come from the Gun Violence Archive, a database that tracks events since 2013 in which four or more people (not counting the shooter) were shot at the same general time and location.

The database’s researchers comb through hundreds of news stories, police reports, and other sources each day and individually verify the reports. Still, since some shootings aren’t reported, the database is likely missing some shootings, and some are missing details.

Vox’s Soo Oh created an interactive map with this database. It shows the mass shootings that have been verified since the Sandy Hook shooting:

Ezra Klein shared this link 

At what point is our own inaction a form of culpability?

This interactive shows the locations and stories of these tragic events.
vox.com

Are mass shootings increasing? It depends on which definition you use.

Using one common definition — shootings at a public place in which the shooter murdered four or more people, excluding domestic, gang, and drug violence — they appear to be getting more common, according to an analysis from Harvard School of Public Health researchers.

But not everyone agrees with this definition.

Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox, for example, defines mass shootings more widely, as any shooting in which at least four people were murdered. Under those terms, mass shootings don’t appear to be increasing.

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health call the definition Fox uses too broad, since it catches domestic, gang, and drug-related shootings that aren’t usually considered mass shootings in layman’s terms.

The Gun Violence Archive is even broader — counting not just murders but injuries, too.

Even under this definition, it’s worth noting that mass shootings make up a tiny portion of America’s firearm deaths, which total more than 32,000 each year.

And the US has way more gun violence than its developed peers:

According to United Nations data compiled by Simon Rogers while at the Guardian, the US had 29.7 firearm homicides per 1 million people in 2012, while Switzerland had 7.7, Canada had 5.1, and Germany had 1.9.

But why does the US have so many more gun homicides than other developed countries? One possible explanation: Americans are generally much more likely to own guns.

The US makes up about 4.4 percent of the global population but possesses 42 percent of the world’s civilian-owned guns. And the empirical research shows that places with more guns have more homicides.

Criminal justice experts widely recognize that America’s unusually high levels of gun violence are a result of cultural and policy decisions that have made firearms far more available in America than in most of the world.

For the US, that means not just more mass shootings, but more gun violence in general.

Update on February 18, 2016: Vox’s map originally used the Mass Shooting Tracker, which began contributing its data to the Gun Violence Archive in 2016.

The newer Gun Violence Archive database uses a slightly narrower definition of a mass shooting, not counting the shooter as one of the four-plus victims needed to qualify as a mass shooting.

100 years ago, Americans talked about Catholics the way they talk about Muslims today

About a century ago, millions of Americans feared that members of a religious group were amassing an arsenal of weapons for a secret, preplanned takeover of the United States.

The feared religious group was not Muslims. It was, as the Los Angeles Times’s Matt Pearce wrote in a great new piece on Wednesday, Catholics:

Hatred had become big business in southwestern Missouri, and its name was the Menace, a weekly anti-Catholic newspaper whose headlines screamed to readers around the nation about predatory priests, women enslaved in convents and a dangerous Roman Catholic plot to take over America.…

America’s deep and widespread skepticism of Catholics is a faint memory in today’s post-Sept. 11 world. But as some conservative politicians call for limits on Muslim immigration and raise questions about whether Muslims are more loyal to Islamic law than American law, the story of Aurora’s long-ago newspaper is a reminder of a long history of American religious intolerance.

Today, there are calls for federal surveillance of mosques in the name of preventing terrorist attacks.

A century ago, it was state laws that allowed the warrantless search of convents and churches in search of supposedly trapped women and purported secret Catholic weapons caches.

Andrew Bossone shared a link.
Anti-Catholic fervor even led to violence.
vox.com|By German Lopez

This may seem absurd today, but there was a real fear among Protestant Americans back then that Catholics were planning to take over the country.

As Pearce reported, the fears led to serious violence: Lynch mobs killed Catholic Italians, arsonists burned down Catholic churches, and there were anti-Catholic riots.

It was a similar sentiment to the kind of Islamophobia today that’s led many Americans to call for shutting down mosques, forcing Muslims to register in a national database, and even banning Islam.

The point of the comparison is not to say that the US faces the same problems today as it did a century ago, or that the discrimination toward Catholics back then and Muslims today is exactly the same.

But when looking back at the history of the US, it’s easy to see a pattern of consistent xenophobia and fears of outsiders.

Xenophobia makes a regular appearance in US history

In response to terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, much of the conversation has focused on refugees and immigration.

This conversation has been tinged with xenophobia toward Muslims — with many Republican presidential candidates going as far as saying the US should ban Muslim refugees, people from Muslim-dominated countries, or Muslims altogether. (The same mantra expressed in Poland, in Hungary, in Croatia…)

But this sort of rhetoric is not new to the US.

As the Pew Research Center found, Americans have generally opposed taking in refugees even as they went through abhorrent, well-known crises. (Vox’s Dara Lind noted that America even rejected some Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany.)

A century ago, a popular Missouri newspaper demonized a religious minority: Catholics
The year was 1915, and the strange new newspaper in Aurora, Mo., had grown so quickly in its first four years that rail officials had to build extra tracks for all the paper and printing materials suddenly rolling into town.
Los Angeles Times ·

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