Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Gideon Levy

Israel journalist: ‘The deal of the century is the joke of century’

The voice is clear, a slight Hebrew accent can be detected when Gideon Levy speaks English. He is precise and concise, showing off maybe some “chutzpah”, but his way of saying things is direct. Does this make Gideon Levy annoying? Certainly not. On the contrary, kindly and patiently he explains what is at stake here.

Some call Gideon Levy Israel’s conscience, others would rather insult him.

Levy is a whistleblower. He would probably hate to be described as such. He is a journalist, and now a columnist at Israeli English daily Haaretz. He is also a board member there. Every week, his columns contradict the nationalist and religious ideology of those in power.

The most hated man in Israel

Levy has the distinct honour of having been considered by the authorities as a “threat” to the country’s security. What did he do to stir up such anger?

Almost every week for three decades he visited the occupied territories and described what he saw there.

Even though he has not been able to go to Gaza since 2006 (Israeli law prevents any Israeli from entering the Strip), he was able to highlight the killing of Palestinians. His book, “The punishment of Gaza“, earned him the nickname “Hamas propagandist” by far-right nationalists. His work led renowned journalist Robert Fisk to ask: “Is he the most hated man in Israel or just the most heroic.”

His goal is simple; re-humanising the Palestinians when everything is being done to dehumanise them, he explains.

From the occupation to the slow suffocation of their culture, dispossession, demolition, erasing their names, their villages, their society…

Levy’s columns speak of daily struggles, give details about people’s stories, name them and give them back their faces, ages and deaths.

This includes the story of a Bedouin woman who, in 1986, was forced to give birth at an Israeli checkpoint. Her newborn died because she could not reach hospital in time and had to walk the two kilometres alone with the baby in her arms.

He remains surprised, he says, by the average Israeli’s ignorance of a reality that often takes place a few minutes away from home. Israeli society “is living in denial, in lies. But totally consciously. People choose to live like this,” he tells MEMO.

“Israeli society is a very aggressive society. But you can’t generalise this. There are easy times and there are hard ones, when there is a war for example. But I still write about Gaza and its uprising.

I wrote that what is happening in Gaza is the uprising of the Gaza ghetto. People became very aggressive.”

This reference to the uprising of the Warsaw ghetto during the Second World War brings to mind a symbolic part of the Israeli “historiography”. “That, might upset people, but I still have total freedom of speech; in my newspaper but not only there. Also on TV. It’s not pleasant every time but I can’t say that they’re trying to shut my mouth.”

Shadow theatre

His years in the media have allowed him to understand Israeli society and the officials that govern it. The latest Israeli elections, which saw incumbent Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu re-elected, are just the latest events which have stirred controversy, not least because of the numerous corruption cases in which Netanyahu is entangled.

In spite of this, his win was no surprise to Levy. “He created this situation in which people believe there is no alternative to him. He rules mainly by spreading fear. But he spreads fear and presents himself as the only one who can protect people. He’s a very talented politician with a very good rhetoric.”

He has also created a situation in which many people believe that these corruption charges are false and that he is simply innocent, he is a victim, and they identify with him.

“Gantz was not a real challenger and he will disappear from the political stage very quickly, I think. But many people voted for him. In fact, they didn’t vote for Gantz but they voted against Netanyahu. There’s people who actually want Netanyahu out,” he adds.

But both men are the same, he continues. “After the operation in Gaza, Gantz said the same things as Netanyahu. When it comes to the major issues, like the occupation, there is not much difference between the two of them.”

Netanyahu’s international connections worry Levy, as do his friendships with right-wing governments in Brazil, the US and Hungary.

“Netanyahu can be friends only with those people. Because nationalists and neo-fascists find common language with other fascists… He can’t really dwell on who is anti-Semitic or not, because at the end of the day, what matters is to maintain the occupation. It justifies everything in his eyes.”

Palestinians stage a protest against the 'Deal of the Century', planned by US President Donald Trump to solve the conflict between Palestine and Israel, in Ramallah, West Bank on 2 July 2018 [Shadi Hatem/Apaimages]

Palestinians stage a protest against the ‘Deal of the Century’, planned by US President Donald Trump to solve the conflict between Palestine and Israel, in Ramallah, West Bank on 2 July 2018 [Shadi Hatem/Apaimages]

The deal of the century: a joke

It is these “friends” that are supporting Israel in peace agreements and annulling previous deals including those which discuss a two-state solution for the Palestine-Israel conflict. Netanyahu, Levy says, “doesn’t speak about it anymore”. “Even when he spoke about it, it was very easy for him because he knew nothing will come out of it. It was the best way to maintain the status quo without doing anything.”

The two-state solution is dead. It’s dead since there are so many settlers and they created an irreversible situation. We have now almost 700,000 settlers and nobody will evacuate them and nobody will ever intend to evacuate them. Without an evacuation, there is no Palestinian state; it’s a joke. (This statement means: we are ready for a forceful transfer of settlers in due time?)

The US’ latest peace plan – dubbed the “deal of the century” – is due to be unveiled in June after the Muslim month of fasting comes to an end. This, Levy says, is the “joke of the century”.

“It will just give Israel more years to maintain the occupation and to carry on its crimes. Nobody can take this seriously. It comes from Trump and [his son-in-law and advisor] Kushner, who can take it seriously?…

It can’t be serious because it’s not fair. Those people are totally one-sided. How can you even consider listening to them when they so clearly stand with only one side and they are so aggressive towards the other side? What kind of mediators can they be?” he adds.

Trump's Deal - Cartoon [Sabaaneh/MiddleEastMonitor]

Trump’s Deal – Cartoon [Sabaaneh/MiddleEastMonitor]

Even the UN declaration that the besieged Gaza Strip will be “uninhabitable” by 2020 cannot save Palestinians there, Levy explains. “It’s not a war. It’s a terrible prison. From time to time, the prisoners are trying to resist, to protest. But the guards hit back harshly. And they stay silent for a few months but again they try to break the cage. It will continue to be like this forever.”

“There is no plan for Gaza because nobody cares. Even Europe doesn’t care much. I’m not even mentioning the US. Everyone became quiet and unmoved. Until the catastrophe comes. But as long as it’s not here, nobody cares.”

Israel against Jews

The occupation led Levy to vote for the Arab-Israeli parties in the last election, he explains this is “because for me it’s hard to vote for any Zionist party. I cannot identify myself anymore with any Zionist list.”

“I’m not anti-Zionist,” he explains, “Post Zionist would be the right definition. I just realised that Zionism completed its purpose; now it’s about creating a democracy, nothing else but a democracy. The ‘all equal’ rights. I don’t see another solution but a one-state solution.”

The debate about Israel’s occupation and what solutions there are to it, has led to accusations of “anti-Semitism”, Levy says.

It paralyses Europe, because nobody wants to be labelled an anti-Semitic. And therefore, they don’t talk about international laws and how they are violated by the illegal occupation. They keep apologising for being anti-Semitic, totally dismissing the crimes perpetrated by the occupation forces.

“There is anti-Semitism in the world but way less than what Israel claims,” he explains. “People in Europe, people with conscience should say we have the full right, more, it’s our duty, to criticise the occupation, to be anti-Zionist.”

Is there hope for change stemming from the Jewish diaspora, especially those in America?

“There are changes sure, but let’s not exaggerate. Still, the Jewish establishment is supporting Israel blindly, automatically supporting the occupation and Netanyahu. Yes, there is a new generation and a new camp there, which is very promising because they are very liberal.

But there is a long way to go, because for most of them, standing against Israel is something they can’t do yet.

But this movement goes hand in hand with changes in the [US’] Democratic party. This is even more promising because it is the first time ever that Netanyahu has been called a racist. We’ve never heard that before.”

Note: This trend in Europe will change when the resistance forces in the Middle-East will force Israel to review its shaky policies

OPINION: A common Enemy, why Israel is embracing fascism in Europe

OPINION: The Israeli Elections, reading the Significance and Repercussions

OPINION: ‘Web of Weirdness’, US and Israeli co-dependent relationship is not just about money

READ: Macron’s anti-Zionism definition draws criticism

 

It’s never Israel’s fault: Two Gazan children are dead and their story goes untold

She was 6, he was 10, blood siblings. Israa and Yassin Abu Khoussa. Did they die in their sleep?

Did they wake up right before the missile struck their home?

Gideon Levy published this  Mar 17, 2016 :

Did they hear the plane and take fright before they died, perhaps attempt to flee?

Was there any place to go? What did they do before going to bed on their last night alive?

Did they dream of anything on their last night? Did they have any dreams?

Israa and Yassin, girl and boy, sister and brother, between Friday and Saturday in the Gaza Strip.

Between Friday and Saturday in the Gaza Strip, 2:30 A.M., long-suffering and bombardment-weary Beit Lahia woke up in terror to the ill-boding sounds of a plane. My friend M. told me his children jumped from their beds in fright.

Israel was avenging the firing of four Qassam rockets into Israel hours earlier. The rockets landed in open areas and caused no damage.

Between Friday and Saturday in the Gaza Strip, Israel Air Force planes struck four targets, “Hamas terror installations.”

The plane flew over Beit Lahia, and the pilot released the bombs. The hits were good. The screen in the plane did not show Yassin, dead, nor Israa, dying.

One of the terror installations was the house of Israa and Yassin Abu Khoussa.

“House” is an exaggeration. A ragged asbestos roof, ragged clothes on the window sill, thin mattresses on the floor covered by cheap blankets, some of them now soaked in blood. Here Israa and Yassin were born, here they lived and here they died.

On the floor of the room that was hit slept the family’s seven children, from 2 years old to 15, and their mother. They are all in shock.

The Israel Defense Forces knows this hut in Beit Lahia well; it has wrecked it a few times already.

But the family continued to live in it; where would they go? Now Suleiman Abu Khoussa, 45, a farmer, sits there, stunned by the death of two of his children in front of their mother, their sisters and their brothers. The mother hides herself away, it’s not possible to talk with her.

Their home is about 300 meters from a Hamas training camp, a distance made much smaller by the IAF’s skilled pilots.

Yassin died at the scene. Israa was taken to Beit Lahia’s Indonesia Hospital in critical condition and then to Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, where she died. They were buried side by side in the al-Salatin cemetery, a brother and sister with no present and no future.

The incident was barely reported in Israel.

It’s hard to think of a baser dehumanization than the disgraceful coverage by the majority of Israeli media outlets of the killing of these two Palestinian children. Israel Hayom mentioned the killing in a tiny subheading that took a contemptible, dismissive tone: “Hamas claims: as a result of the attack, two children were killed.”

It’s not hard to imagine what would have happened had Hamas killed two children, brother and sister, with a Qassam rocket.

One can imagine not only a ruthless military retaliation but also the emotional reporting: beasts, the headlines would surely have shouted, Hamas child-killers.

But our child-killers are pure, after all it wasn’t intentional. It never is.

Israel was not asked to issue a condemnation, no one even thought to express regret, much less to offer compensation.

I would very much like to visit the Abu Khoussa home in order to tell Israelis what their air force did there. But Israel doesn’t let Israeli journalists into Gaza.

Britain’s The Independent was there this week to report to its readers.

Yedioth Ahronoth reported on the guitar that Aviv Geffen gave to a guy whose own guitar broke when he hit a terrorist in the head with it, together with our hearts.

Marj Henningsen shared a link.
It’s not hard to imagine what would have happened had Hamas killed two Israeli children, brother and sister, with a Qassam.
haaretz.com

 

A formal apology is very timely: Haaretz on Palestinian diaspora

Road to reconciliation?

The US again vetoed the Independent Palestinian State. The Palestinians responded by applying to various UN international conventions to prosecute the many war crime Israelites.

The US want to boycott the Palestinians in the West Bank by denying them the necessary and promised financial aids for daring to prosecute the war criminals. The Palestinians have to wait 6 months before the UN “studies” the requests to join the international community.

In the meantime, the Israeli war criminals on the lengthy list are avoiding traveling to Europe where arrest mandates are awaiting them.

What is the most useful is for the Palestinians to press on the Divesting and Boycotting Israeli interests and those companies still intent on investing in the West Bank purely Jewish colonies.

 Tonnie Ch posted on FB

Read this from @Gideon Levy on the first day of the year http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.634725

“….We should apologize for the innumerable dead killed for no reason, for the endless lies and deception. For tyranny in the territories and for apartheid.

For trampling a nation’s dignity, for suffocating its freedom and for separating it and breaking it up into tiny nations. For erasing its heritage and disdaining its culture (…)”.

Here comes the new Israeli, a man’s man; with a tiny skullcap, service in an elite army unit, high-tech, English and a swimming pool, with the coolest and most up-to-date message: “Stop apologizing, we love Israel” (rhymes in Hebrew); the poster is already in evidence on several balconies.

On Monday night, at a meeting convened by Ayelet Shaked (Habayit Hayehudi), the most successful politician in Israel at present explained: “This election is between those who apologize and those who are proud … those who are objective and those who are in favor of the State of Israel.” Drum roll.

Palestinian refugees leaving a village near Haifa, June 1948

Palestinian refugees leaving a village near Haifa, June 1948. Photo by Corbis

Well, [Habayit Hayehudi chairman] Naftali Bennett, I apologize and I love Israel (of course not your Israel and not the present Israel); I’m objective and I’m in favor of (a just) State of Israel; I apologize and I’m proud.

You’re going to stop apologizing? Israel never even started doing so. If only it had apologized a long time ago. If only it would acknowledge its sins, if only it would accept moral responsibility for them.

It’s no shame to apologize – it’s far more embarrassing not to do so. Apologizing is a strength, not a weakness, and on the way to reconciliation (with the Palestinians) we have to stop at the first station – an apology.

It’s true that in the elite unit of Bennett and Yinon Magal they don’t apologize for anything, not even for acts of murder, assassinations and abductions (the murder of Abu Jihad, for example, or the abduction of Sheikh Obeid). In the settlements they don’t apologize for anything either – not for the exploitation, not for the disinheritance and not for the theft.

As a rule, in Israel people don’t apologize for anything, not in the occupation nor on the road.  (They just commit suicide to relieve their heavily burdened conscious)

Here only nerds apologize. Guilt feelings are an embarrassment, and apologizing is for those with no backbone. That’s why Bennett’s election slogan: “Stop Apologizing. Be Proud” will become so catchy and popular: the “apologizers” vs. “the proud,” the “objective ones” vs. “lovers of the country.” I’m proud to belong to the former group.

I would like to apologize, if that would be of any significance, to the entire Palestinian people, throughout the generations.

For 1948, for 1967 and for everything that happened in their wake. An apology for 1948 would not have made the state that was established less just – it would have become more just.

For the mass expulsion and for preventing the return, for the ethnic cleansing in several districts and for several acts of slaughter, which may be part of every war – we can and should apologize.

We can and should apologize for the fact that what happened in 1948 has never ended. That the spirit of 1948 has not passed, and continues to this very day in the State of Israel’s basic attitude toward the Palestinian inhabitants of the land, in its sense of ownership and superiority, in its aggressiveness and violence, in its ultranationalism and racism.

Nor has anything changed in the policy of dispossession: Take what you can – then as now, when the State of Israel is already a regional power. We should apologize for that. We should apologize for the innumerable dead killed for no reason, for the endless lies and deception. For tyranny in the territories and for apartheid.

For trampling a nation’s dignity, for suffocating its freedom and for separating it and breaking it up into tiny nations. For erasing its heritage and disdaining its culture. For short-changing Israeli Arabs and for demonstrations of racism against them. For the “price tag” crimes and the Operation Protective Edge crimes. For all of them we should apologize.

Apologizing would not solve anything or atone for anything, but it could signal a genuine intention to turn a new leaf. Apologizing would broadcast moral strength and self-confidence, which the country so badly lacks, convinced as it is that it can live forever on its sword, even if there is not a single historical precedent for that.

For all these things (and more) Israel will have to apologize some day.

Anyone who believes that even if the reconciliation is delayed, it will eventually come, understands that it must include an apology.

That’s how it was in South Africa and that’s how it will be in Israel, after the days of the Bennetts, if it’s not too late.

(It is never too late, as long as the Palestyinians never desist from demanding their due rights)

 

JAFFA, Israel . The injuries suffered in Tel Aviv that night stemmed not from rocket fire but from a premeditated assault by a group of extremist Israeli Jews.

Chanting “Death to Arabs” and “Death to leftists,” they attacked protesters with clubs.

Although several demonstrators were beaten and required medical attention, the police made no arrests.

The same thing happened at another antiwar protest in Haifa a week later.  This time, the victims included the city’s deputy mayor, Suhail Assad, and his son. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made no statement condemning the violence, even though he had previously stated his primary concern was the safety of Israeli citizens.

The vilification of the few Israelis who don’t subscribe to right-wing doctrine is not new.

Similar acts of incitement occurred before the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1995. But now they have multiplied, escalated and spread.

On July 10, the veteran Israeli actress Gila Almagor did not show up to perform at Tel Aviv’s Habima Theater; she had received threats that she would be murdered on stage. In an interview in the Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot a few days earlier, she had expressed feeling ashamed after a 16-year old Palestinian, Muhammad Abu Khdeir, was kidnapped and burned alive by Jewish extremists.

In an interview during the Gaza war, the popular comedian Orna Banai said she felt terrible that Palestinian women and children were being killed — she was subsequently fired from her position as spokeswoman for an Israeli cruise ship operator.

And Haaretz hired bodyguards for its columnist Gideon Levy after he wrote an article criticizing Israeli Air Force pilots.

The aggressive silencing of anyone who voices disapproval of Israeli policies or expresses empathy with Palestinians is the latest manifestation of an us-versus-them mentality that has been simmering for decades.

It is based on the narrative that Palestinians are enemies who threaten Jewish sovereignty and are solely to blame for the failure to achieve peace. The Israeli peace camp — which remains obsessively focused on stopping settlement expansion and pursuing the ever-elusive two-state solution while ignoring Israel’s failure to separate religion and state and guarantee equal rights for Arab citizens — has been incapable of challenging this mentality.

Israeli society has been unable and unwilling to overcome an exclusivist ethno-religious nationalism that privileges Jewish citizens and is represented politically by the religious settler movement and the increasingly conservative secular right.

Israel’s liberal, progressive forces remain weak in the face of a robust economy that profits from occupation while international inaction reinforces the status quo. In their attempt to juggle being both Jewish and democratic, most Israelis are choosing the former at the expense of the latter.

Israel has never, for example, genuinely addressed the fact that non-Jewish Arabs who generally identify as Palestinian account for about 20% of the population (this excludes the approximately three million Palestinians living under Israel’s control in East Jerusalem and the West Bank).

Israel has also never clearly defined its borders, preferring to keep them vague and porous. Nor has it defined what it means to be “Israeli,” as distinct from being “Jewish,” leaving a vacuum that has been filled by nationalist and religious ideologues.

This has allowed the us-versus-them mentality to bleed into Israeli Jewish society. “Us” no longer refers to any Jewish citizen, and “them” to any Palestinian.

Now, “us” means all those who defend the status quo of occupation and settlement expansion, including many Christian evangelicals and Republicans in America. And “them” means anyone who tries to challenge that status quo, whether a rabbi, a dissenting Israeli soldier or the president of the United States.

Perhaps this shouldn’t come as a shock.

For most of Israel’s existence, the majority of Israelis have allowed the state, in the name of Jewish sovereignty and security, to violate Palestinians’ basic human rights — including access to water and the freedom of movement and assembly.

The state has killed unarmed protesters and then failed to carry out investigations; it has allowed settlers and soldiers to act with impunity; and it has systematically discriminated against non-Jewish citizens. After so many years of repressing those who stand in the way, the transition to targeting “one of your own” isn’t so difficult.

Now it is the few Jewish Israelis who speak the language of human rights who are branded as enemies.

Zeev Sternhell, a political scientist and an expert on fascism, believes that “radical nationalism” and the “erosion of Enlightenment values” have reached new heights in Israel. “To grieve for the loss of life on both sides is already a subversive act, treason,” he told Haaretz. Mr. Sternhell has experienced Jewish extremist violence firsthand; in 2008, a settler planted a bomb in his home that wounded him.

Israelis increasingly seem unwilling to listen to criticism, even when it comes from within their own family. Not only are they not willing to listen, they are trying to silence it before it can even be voiced. With a family like that, I would rather be considered one of “them.”

Mairav Zonszein, an Israeli-American writer, translator and editor, blogs at +972 Magazine.

Zionist settler kiddies and Israel army using stun grenades to keep Palestinian farmers off their land

Want to meet the victims of hostile acts?

Go to the village of Burin, south of Nablus, because no article can convey the fear, methodicalness, hypocrisy and collaboration of each entity that seeks to make the villagers loathe their lives.

Who will protect Israel’s poor settler kiddies?

While settlers covet a West Bank hill, the army is using stun grenades to keep Palestinian farmers off their land.

 published in Haaretz this Dec. 30, 2013 

Children playing in the Bracha B outpost in December 2013.

Children playing in the Bracha B outpost in December 2013. Photo by Olivier Fitoussi

If the settlers from Yitzhar and its outposts take a rest from their sacred harassment of these villagers, there are still the Bracha B outpost and the mini-outpost Givat Ronen to show these goyim just who the chosen people are.

And let’s not deprive the army and the Border Police, who work day and night to carry out their supreme mission of protecting Israeli citizens, even when those citizens are shooting at Palestinians, throwing stones at them, setting trees and cars on fire, keeping Palestinians from harvesting their olive groves despite pre-coordination with the army, rolling burning tires onto fields, or expelling people from their land.

Burin’s eastern neighborhood is a special target of attack, 500 to 800 meters away from a hilltop claimed by Bracha B and Givat Ronen.

Daringly, young Palestinian couples are building their homes in the neighborhood, as Israelis come down the hill and try to stop the construction. Heroically, they raise their children, who sometimes see psychologists from Doctors Without Borders to help them cope with their fear and powerlessness.

Here is a partial list of some of the latest attacks, taken from a letter sent by human rights group Yesh Din to Maj. Gen. Nitzan Alon, the general in charge of the army’s Central Command:

* October 31: Israelis go down the hill from Bracha B to Burin. The Israel Defense Forces arrives at the village’s eastern neighborhood and fires tear gas at village Palestinian residents.

* November 9: Israelis go down the hill from Bracha B to eastern Burin and throw stones. IDF soldiers are present but don’t intervene. Village residents throw stones back at the Israeli assailants. The army fires tear gas, stun grenades and rubber-coated metal bullets – at the Palestinians, of course.

* November 10: Same as the day before.

* November 13: Same as November 9 and 10.

* November 14: Same thing, but with a few light injuries and three arrests, including that of a 13-year-old boy. Injuries and arrests among the Palestinians, what else?

* November 25: Anonymous assailants throw two firebombs at the Omran family home at night. Since then, the youngest child has been having nightmares and is frightened by noises. Playing outside the house is dangerous, because at any moment “the neighbors” could come down the hill and spread fear.

Let there be no doubt: The settlers are coveting the hill on whose slope the eastern neighborhood of Burin is built.

After all, there are dozens of dunams of pastoral landscape and air as pure as in the Alps. The settlers have already evicted the owners of the one house that’s already there, glory be to God. As for a road, they halted that project a decade ago. Now olives are harvested there, but only in the presence of a rescue team from Rabbis for Human Rights.

‘Two leftists and two locals’

The IDF and Border Police don’t sit idly by.

They do some expulsions of their own. Last Monday, about 10 minutes after this reporter, a photographer and two Burin residents reached the top of the hill, three Border Police officers approached us. One of them, Saher Ghanem, put the stun grenade he had been holding in his hand back in his pocket only when he was about 10 meters from us. “This is a closed military zone,” he announced.

“Show us the order,” I challenged. He didn’t produce it. The other Border Police officer, Niran Yadin, called in the situation.

“There’s two leftists and two locals,” he reported.

Above us, at the edges of Bracha B, soldiers gathered and came down toward us. Sgt. Liran Fuchs acted friendly and extended a hand to one of the Burin residents. He had no order to show us either. Of course, when only the locals are around, who needs an order if you have stun grenades and tear gas?

Now take a look at what the IDF Spokesman’s Office wrote to Haaretz:

* “The Palestinians’ presence in the area under discussion does not constitute a violation of the law, and it is indeed Area B” (which is under Palestinian civil control and joint Israeli and Palestinian security control).

What generosity. We, the Settler Defense Forces, allow Palestinians to step foot (for now) on the land they have been cultivating since before Theodor Herzl was born.

* “Nonetheless, the site is a known locus of conflict between the populations of the area.”

Yes, after all, everything in life is symmetrical, isn’t it? Between those on the hilltop and those in the valley, between shepherds and farmers, between boys from Mars and girls from Venus.

* “During disturbances of the peace, the way we deal with the disorderly is identical and is determined in accordance with a situation assessment on the ground.”

Identical?

Is that why when settlers attack Palestinians, the army expels the Palestinians from their land? Is that why the army broke into the Omrans’ home three weeks after assailants firebombed it?

* “Due to a misunderstanding, at the beginning it was indeed said that the area had been designated a closed military zone, but the matter was then clarified and no action was taken to disperse those present in the area. Directives on the matter will be clarified to the forces.”

Sure. Let’s talk the next time the Palestinian residents are forcibly dispersed.

The outposts are illegal, even according to the Israeli laws of plunder. But the IDF and Border Police must protect Israeli criminals as long as they’re settlers in occupied territory.

The toddlers of the Bracha B outpost, with large knitted kippot and long sidelocks, who last week were still playing soccer with what was left of the snow, are indeed entitled to any protection there is. But no one is protecting them from the malignant disease of a master race.

Most Israeli Jews support Apartheid regime? Why?

Based on a sample of 503 interviewees, most of the Jewish public in Israel supports the establishment of an apartheid regime in Israel if it formally annexes the West Bank.

The survey shows that majority also explicitly favors discrimination against the state’s Arab citizens. The survey was conducted by Dialog  and commissioned by the Yisraela Goldblum Fund.

 published on Oct.23, 2012 in the daily Haaretz:

“The questions were written by a group of academia-based peace and civil rights activists. Dialog is headed by Tel Aviv University Prof. Camil Fuchs.

1. 59% of the Jewish public wants preference for Jews over Arabs in admission to jobs in government ministries.

2. 49% of the Jews want the State of Israel to treat Jewish citizens better than Arab ones;

3. 42% don’t want to live in the same building with Arabs

4. 42% don’t want their children in the same class with Arab children.

5. 33% of the Jewish public wants a law barring Israeli Arabs from voting for the Knesset

6. 69%  objects to giving 2.5 million Palestinians the right to vote if Israel annexes the West Bank.

7. 74% is in favor of separate roads for Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank. (24% believe separate roads are “a good situation” and 50 percent believe they are “a necessary situation.”

8. 47% want part of Israel’s Arab population to be transferred to the Palestinian Authority

9. 36% support transferring some of the Arab towns from Israel to the PA, in exchange for keeping some of the West Bank settlements.

Although the territories have not been annexed, most of the Jewish public:

1. 58% already believes Israel practices apartheid against Arabs.

2. Only 31% think such a system is not in force here.

3. 38% of the Jewish public wants Israel to annex the territories with settlements on them, (while 48 percent object).

The survey distinguishes among the various communities in Israeli society – secular, observant, religious, ultra-Orthodox and former Soviet immigrants.

The ultra-Orthodox, in contrast to those who described themselves as religious or observant, hold the most extreme positions against the Palestinians. An overwhelming majority (83 percent ) of Haredim are in favor of segregated roads and 71 percent are in favor of transfer.

The ultra-Orthodox are also the most anti-Arab group :

1. 70 percent of them support legally barring Israeli Arabs from voting,

2. 82 percent support preferential treatment from the state toward Jews,

3. and 95 percent are in favor of discrimination against Arabs in admission to workplaces.

The group classifying itself as religious is the second most anti-Arab. New immigrants from former Soviet states are closer in their views of the Palestinians to secular Israelis, and are far less radical than the religious and Haredi groups.

However, the number of people who answered “don’t know” in the “Russian” community was higher than in any other.

The Russians register the highest rate of satisfaction with life in Israel (77 percent ) and the secular Israelis the lowest – only 63 percent.

On average, 69 percent of Israelis are satisfied with life in Israel.

Secular Israelis appear to be the least racist:

1. 68 percent of them would not mind having Arab neighbors in their apartment building,

2. 73 percent would not mind Arab students in their children’s class

3. and 50 percent believe Arabs should not be discriminated against in admission to workplaces.

The survey indicates that a third to half of Jewish Israelis want to live in a state that practices formal, open discrimination against its Arab citizens.

An even larger majority wants to live in an apartheid state if Israel annexes the territories.

The survey conductors say perhaps the term “apartheid” was not clear enough to some interviewees.

However, the interviewees did not object strongly to describing Israel’s character as “apartheid” already today, without annexing the territories. Only 31 percent objected to calling Israel an “apartheid state” and said “there’s no apartheid at all.”

In contrast, 39% believe apartheid is practiced “in a few fields”; 19 percent believe “there’s apartheid in many fields” and 11 percent do not know.

The “Russians,” as the survey calls them, display the most objection to classifying their new country as an apartheid state. A third of them – 35 percent – believe Israel does not practice apartheid at all, compared to 28 percent of the secular and ultra-Orthodox communities, 27 percent of the religious and 30 percent of the observant Jews who hold that view.

Altogether, 58 percent of all the groups believe Israel practices apartheid “in a few fields” or “in many fields,” while 11 percent don’t know.

Finally, the interviewees were asked whether “a famous American author [who] is boycotting Israel, claiming it practices apartheid” should be boycotted or invited to Israel. About half (48 percent ) said she should be invited to Israel, 28 percent suggest no response and only 15 percent call to boycott her.

Note 1: Apartheid originated from the liberal Israelis  https://adonis49.wordpress.com/2012/08/17/so-many-of-such-minorities-only-in-israel-counting-is-a-sacred-business/

Note 2Visualizing the Occupation: Israeli and Palestinian children in the eyes of the law
Photo: Visualising the Occupation: Israeli and Palestinian children in the eyes of the law

 


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

April 2020
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Blog Stats

  • 1,376,515 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 720 other followers

%d bloggers like this: