Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Henry Mintzberg

Here’s a question from a recent workshop participant. “How do you handle someone complaining about a co-worker?”

First, you want people to come to you. Some managers want challenges, problems, and people to go away. They hide in their offices, sneak to the elevator, or duck into the restroom to avoid facing tough conversations.

By Dan Rockwell?

Suggestions for dealing with co-worker complaints:

  1. Ask the complainer, “What can you do to solve this?” Some complainers want you to solve their problem. That’s a last resort. Savior-managers create irresponsible employees.
  2. The complainer may say, “I don’t know what I can do.” Say, “Why don’t you come back this afternoon with some ideas?”
  3. Develop a strategy to deal with the issue. If you can’t, try number four.
  4. Invite the person being complained about to a meeting to discuss the issue. You’ll be surprised that issues have several sides.
  5. Focus on issues and performance rather than personalities, unless personality is the problem.
  6. Take small steps in positive directions, don’t expect giant leaps. Identify observable behaviors. If you can’t see it, you can’t measure it.
  7. Follow up. “Let’s get together in two weeks to follow up.”

More suggestions:

  1. Withhold judgment.
  2. Never take sides.
  3. Clarify, is it personal or performance. It’s often personal.
  4. Warning, backstabbers are masters at seeming helpful while being destructive.

Bonus tip: When you bring the two parties together and one of them had no idea there was a problem, you’re dealing with a backstabber. Excuse the one who’s in the dark and deal with the real issue.

Most importantly: Deal with interpersonal tensions because relationships are worth it.

Read what Facebook contributors added: Leadership Freak Coffee Shop

You’re great at doing but are you great at connecting? I’m still blown away by Henry Mintzberg’s one word of advice, “Connect.”

Business stresses and people tensions result in unhappy, disengaged staff unless leaders model and encourage connecting. Meaningful relationships break the grip of distrust, disengagement, and fear.

Connecting with others is the secret to success in business and happiness in life.

Continue being great at getting the job done and add connecting to your leadership skills.

Great success: Great success requires great connecting. If you can succeed without out others you aren’t going very far.

You can’t lead people you don’t know and understand.

Connecting tips:

  1. Believe connecting is good for business, others, and you. You can’t fake it. Techniques without authenticity create fakers who aren’t trusted and often end tragically.
  2. Go to others; don’t wait for them to come to you. Leaders move first.
  3. Be fully present. Give the gift of yourself.
  4. Engage in small talk. Avoid being so focused on tasks that you ignore people.
  5. Give yourself first. Model the type of conversations you’re encouraging in the office.
  6. Acknowledge emotional states but avoid subtle put downs. “You seem happy today, what happened.” For example. You might privately say, “You’ve seemed down lately are you okay?”
  7. Listen with your eyes. If eye contact is uncomfortable focus on the forehead.
  8. Listen with your body. Relax your stance to avoid a, “I have to get going message.” Sit if you can.
  9. Show appreciation to everyone regardless of status.

Suggestions from Facebook contributors:

  1. Communicate the good and the bad.
  2. Put people first.
  3. Be yourself.
  4. Share without concern for the gain.
  5. Show compassion.
  6. Have empathy.

See the list of suggestions from Facebook contributors: Leadership Freak Coffee Shop.

How can leaders connect with colleagues, superiors, or subordinates?

 

What are these jargon: Macro and micro policies, leadership, economics, management…?

Like stating: “Macro-leadership is just as bad as micro-management.” 

During a conversation with Dan Rockwell, Henry Mintzberg explained that, “It’s destructive to separate management from leadership. Leaders need to get their hands dirty.”

No buy in: Mintzberg believes that leaders focused on setting strategy and vision but who are removed from the front lines eventually develop a vision for the organization so out of touch that the rest of the organization fails to buy in.

Frustrated buy in: Mintzberg also believes there’s something worse than failure to buy in. There’s the problem of buying into a pie-in-the-sky vision but being incapable of taking any steps toward realization.

More devastating: Disconnected strategy and vision is one problem with macro-leadership but there’s something more devastating.

“Arrogance comes from detachment.” Henry Mintzberg

When I asked Mintzberg to share the one piece of advice he most loves to share he said one word, “Connect.

Humility: Connecting expresses, creates, and nurtures humility. Withdrawal suggests independence; connecting requires interdependence.

Humility is always practice never theory. (curious to discover all the alternatives and potentials for improvement?)

Talking humility without practicing humility results in arrogance. When Jesus said let the leader among you be as one who serves, he turned leadership on its head and explained the cure for arrogance.

“Humility is common sense… None of us is an expert at everything… Humility is holding power for the good of others.” John Dickson.

Sources of arrogance: Facebook contributors suggest sources of arrogance include:

  1. Fear.
  2. Being surrounded by indulgent “yes” people.
  3. Being a talker not a doer.
  4. Prior success. You think you know how to make it work because it worked before.
  5. Not being okay with saying I don’t know.

See more reader contributions on Facebook.

Mintzberg’s latest book: “Managing

*****

How do leaders connect? What prevents leaders from connecting?

Getting rid of all MBAs: Why? Is the problem How to rethink Management?

Dan RockwellI asked Professor Henry Mintzberg, author of 140 articles and 13 books:

“If you waved a magic wand over businesses, what would you change?”

Mintzberg said, “I’d get rid of all MBA’s. We’d lose some good people, but in the whole, it would be a positive move.” Never mistake quiet voices for weak people.

A few problems that trouble Mintzberg about MBA’s, including management gone completely off the rails, are:

  1. MBA graduate with distorted pictures of management. They believe management is about management principles, among other flawed beliefs.
  2. They believe they can manage anything regardless of the business type.
  3. They have knowledge without experience which leads to hubris.

And if management isn’t about management principles, what’s it about? Mintzberg says “Management is connecting.” 

Although Mintzberg didn’t use the terms human or humane, they seem to explain his passion. He despises placing emphasis on productivity, particularly built on the backs of over-worked, burned-out employees. Pushing people simply works in the short-term.

Bloodletting:

Mintzberg believes cutbacks and layoffs are equivalent to the failed practice of bloodletting. They produce short-term profits and long-term loses. Mintzberg loves saying, “If you want productivity, fire everyone and sell from inventory.”

Long-term success:

Mintzberg believes organizations should be built for long-term success rather than quick profits. Shifting to the long view may be the most radical change businesses can make because it requires connecting.

Henry Mintzberg thinks modern management is off the tracks. He said:

“The problem in America isn’t the economy: It’s management.” Like what problems?

  1. MBA’s with no experience.
  2. Shareholder value.
  3. Separating management from leadership.
  4. Making Top-down strategy.  Strategy should emerge from conversations within an organization.
  5. Excessive executive compensations: Narcissism with over-compensated CEO.
  6. Using terms like “human resources” and “human capital” is sickening.
  7. Pushing employees to work harder and longer.
  8. Current hiring practices.

Hiring a CEO:

Henry Mintzberg says: “Stop hiring people who can impress.” 

Stop looking for perfect candidates: “Flaws aren’t fatal. Listen to the people who know them best, the people who worked for them. There are only two ways to find out someone’s flaws, marry them or work for them.”

Searching for perfect – flawless – candidates prevent anyone from saying the “emperor has no cloths”. In a world filled with “perfect” leaders, fakery prevails.

Fakery exacerbates stress in an already stress-filled world.

Email:

Mintzberg isn’t a big fan of email, to add a ninth item to the list. It obviously has a place but, “It does have an off button. I check email every three weeks.”  Mintzberg can be contrarian but not contrary.

Rockwell is asking:

What do you think is wrong with modern management?

If you could wave a magic wand over businesses, how would they change?

How are you navigating short-term vs. long-term views of business, management, and leadership?

Recent article by Mintzberg and Todd: The Offline Executive

A new approach to leadership development: Coaching Ourselves


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

October 2020
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