Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘In pictures

George Hawi visiting a Communist Militia Camp, Ayoun Al Siman Mountains, 1976
George Hawi visiting a Communist Militia Camp, Ayoun Al Siman Mountains, 1976 Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi
Political martyrs memorial rally, Almarg village, 1977
Political martyrs memorial rally, Almarg village, 1977 Diab Alkarssifi Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi
Political martyrs memorial rally, Almarg village, 1977
Political martyrs memorial rally, Almarg village, 1977 Diab Alkarssifi Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi

A lost Lebanon – in pictures

When artist Ania Dabrowska started working with Diab Alkarssifi, a homeless Lebanese man in London, she made a startling discovery. He was a compulsive photographer with a hoard of unseen pictures from his homeland

To support the publication of this archive, visit

A Lebanese Archive at kickstarter.com/projects/ 723440909/a-lebanese-archive-by-ania-dabrowska

Brothers Khader and Mohammed Alkarssifi, Baalbeck, 1977
Brothers Khader and Mohammed Alkarssifi, Baalbeck, 1977 Diab Alkarssifi Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi

Nesrin Jare and Ietedal Alkarssifi, Baalbeck, 1981
Nesrin Jare and Ietedal Alkarssifi, Baalbeck, 1981 Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi
Mustafa Shalha, Baalbeck, 1974
Mustafa Shalha, Baalbeck, 1974 Photograph: Diab Alkarssifi

 

Show me in pictures your New Year’s Eve Traditions

Wear brand-new pink underwear to attract love.

Worst-case scenario, you’re wearing nice undies 🙂

2. At exactly 12:00, step forward with your right foot to start the year off with…YOUR RIGHT FOOT!

4. Walk through the streets banging loudly on pots and pans at midnight.

6. Wear white to scare away bad spirits.

BuzzFeed

7. Jump seven waves for good luck.

One for each day of the week.

8. Give some gifts to goddess Iemanja.

She’s the goddess of water, and she loves gifts, especially flowers.

Throw some into the ocean — if they come back, it means she didn’t accept them. Don’t worry, you can try again next New Year’s Eve.

9. Watch Jools Holland’s Hootenanny, even though it’s awful and everyone hates it.

11. Eat a spoonful of lentils at midnight for a year filled with work and money.

And don’t complain if you hate lentils!

12. Sweep your house inside out to remove bad energy.

Brandon Cripps / Creative Commons / Via Flickr: brandoncripps

13. Walk around your block with an empty suitcase for a year full of travel!

15. Make a doll (more like an effigy) to burn to signify the burning away of the old year and the welcoming of the new one.

Men dress up in drag and pretend to be the “widow” of the doll and beg for coins in the streets “to save my husband from being burned.”

17. Crack an egg in a glass at midnight and leave it on the window sill overnight. Whatever figure it has made in the morning, that’s what your fortune will bring next year.

19. You tell your fortune by throwing melted metal into cold water.

21. At 12 a.m. on New Year’s Day, grab 12 pennies and then go outside your house and you throw the pennies behind you while you face the opposite of the street.

This will bring you money in the new year.

23. Eat oliebollen, which are like big oily balls of dough, deep-fried and covered in icing sugar.

25. Turn on all the lights in the house on New Year’s Eve to ward off evil spirits.

26. Open all the doors, cabinets, and windows and then run around shutting them after it hits midnight.

28. Fill pots and pans with water and throw the water out the front door once the clock strikes midnight.

29. Write down a wish on a piece of paper, burn it, throw it into a champagne glass, and drink it before 12:01.

nito100/nito100

Gross but fun!

31. Immediately after the bells, the first-footing begins, which means being the first person across a friend’s or neighbor’s threshold.

The first-foot usually brings several gifts, including a coin, bread, salt, coal, or whisky, which respectively represent financial prosperity, food, flavor, warmth, and good cheer.

32. You must eat a grape with each bell strike at midnight for prosperity.

It’s harder than you’d think to get all 12 done in time.

34. Get pomegranates and throw them from our balcony to the street below.

The more they “burst,” the more plentiful our year is supposed to be.

36. Wear yellow underwear for “good luck.”

Wear yellow underwear for "good luck."

 

Steady process for Erasing Palestine? In pictures 

In Pictures: Erasing Palestine
Palestinians fear the old stone houses of Lifta, the last deserted pre-1948 Palestinian village, will soon be destroyed.
Last updated: 11 Nov 2014

The last deserted pre-1948 Palestinian village in Israel is facing possible destruction. Located on the outskirts of Jerusalem, the village of Lifta is an empty collection of old stone houses that have fallen into neglect.

For the past 20 years, the Israeli government has pushed to destroy the remaining buildings to make room for new luxury homes, hotels, a shopping mall and a recreation park. The courts have rejected governmental requests to build, but the construction of a new railway line through the village has many thinking the end is near.

In the meantime, local Israeli Jews use Lifta as a picnic spot and swim in its ancient spring. For the few surviving Palestinians who were born in Lifta, visiting their former village brings a mix of emotions: nostalgia for an idyllic childhood spent amongst the olive groves, and bitterness at the destruction and appropriation of their homes and heritage.

Lifta’s inhabitants were systematically expelled by Israeli forces between 1947 and 1948. Afterwards, Jewish immigrants, mostly from Yemen, moved into the empty homes.

Following the Six-Day War in 1967, the Israeli government offered the Jewish residents of Lifta new homes in Jerusalem; they happily accepted, and blew up the roofs of Lifta’s houses before leaving to ensure no-one would return.

The Palestinian villages inside present-day Israel, deserted in 1948, have largely disappeared from the map. While Israel still retains around one million Palestinian residents, many fear the destruction of Lifta would erase, once and for all, the memory of those Palestinians who lost their homes when the state of Israel was created.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Before 1948, the village of Lifta had 500 houses with about 3,000 inhabitants. Half were in the upper part of the village, which has already been mostly demolished, and the other half in the lower part.

A few old houses from the upper part of Lifta remain visible today.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Ilan Shtayer – a former Israeli soldier who is now a member of “Combatants for Peace”, an Israeli-Palestinian organisation demanding an end to the occupation of Palestinian land – is part of an association called “Save Lifta”, which is fighting for the preservation of the village.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

In one of the remaining houses of Lifta, a young Israeli woman comes to have a picnic. On the wall, written in Arabic, is the slogan: “Lifta is ours, we will come back.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

An Israeli family enjoys a picnic in Lifta. When asked, they said they did not know the story of the village.

/Vinciane JacquetVinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Young Israelis bathe in the former spring of Lifta.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

A verse from a poem by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish on a wall inside one of the old homes in Lifta reads: “This land deserves life.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Since 1967, the Israeli army has been using Lifta for military exercises because the environment and rough, hilly terrain are similar to Lebanon.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Israel Jalal, who was born in Lifta, had to leave the village with his family when he was 12. He lived in the upper part of Lifta, and his childhood home was demolished a long time ago to make room for an administrative building. He used to take his boys to Lifta “to let them know it is their land”.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Palestinian woman from Gaza who was two years old when her family fled the village, and was subsequently raised in the United States. She supports the right to return.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Yacoub Odeh lived with his family in Lifta. The roof of his home was blown off by the Israeli Army in 1969, but the remains of the house are still visible. He remembers a childhood of gardens, olive groves and racing other children to school.

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/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Before 1948, the village of Lifta had 500 houses with about 3,000 inhabitants. Half were in the upper part of the village, which has already been mostly demolished, and the other half in the lower part. A few old houses from the upper part of Lifta remain visible today.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Ilan Shtayer – a former Israeli soldier who is now a member of “Combatants for Peace”, an Israeli-Palestinian organisation demanding an end to the occupation of Palestinian land – is part of an association called “Save Lifta”, which is fighting for the preservation of the village.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

In one of the remaining houses of Lifta, a young Israeli woman comes to have a picnic. On the wall, written in Arabic, is the slogan: “Lifta is ours, we will come back.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

An Israeli family enjoys a picnic in Lifta. When asked, they said they did not know the story of the village.

/Vinciane JacquetVinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Young Israelis bathe in the former spring of Lifta.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

A verse from a poem by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish on a wall inside one of the old homes in Lifta reads: “This land deserves life.”

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Since 1967, the Israeli army has been using Lifta for military exercises because the environment and rough, hilly terrain are similar to Lebanon.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Israel Jalal, who was born in Lifta, had to leave the village with his family when he was 12. He lived in the upper part of Lifta, and his childhood home was demolished a long time ago to make room for an administrative building. He used to take his boys to Lifta “to let them know it is their land”.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Palestinian woman from Gaza who was two years old when her family fled the village, and was subsequently raised in the United States. She supports the right to return.

/Vinciane Jacquet/Al Jazeera

Yacoub Odeh lived with his family in Lifta. The roof of his home was blown off by the Israeli Army in 1969, but the remains of the house are still visible. He remembers a childhood of gardens, olive groves and racing other children to school.

Discover Vintage Lebanon and Beirut: In pictures

Is Nostalgia beautiful?

The history of Lebanon touches us for reasons that go beyond a vintage tramway gloriously making its way through the old city streets.

This overpowering sense of nostalgia has more to do with being aware of living in a country that has been stabbed in the heart over and over again, and has still managed to come out of it (albeit scarred) alive – as beautiful as ever and as celebrated as ever.

Nur Turkmani posted on Listomania this July 14, 2014

Call it poetic excess, but Lebanon has always reminded me of a fierce, immensely beautiful lady that has been shot at from all directions but still manages to make her way up – time and time again. Let’s take a look back at lady Lebanon. Isn’t she lovely?


Manara, (phare) 1933. (Image via Old Beirut)


Fairouz stars together with Ihsan Sadek in Henri Barakat’s 1967 hit ‘Safarbarlek‘. (Image via NOW Media)


Good day, fine gentlemen. El-Mina (the port), year unknown. (Image via Lebnan Online)


Beirut race track, 1920. (Image via Old Beirut)


Pierre & Friends, anyone? Batroun, 1893. (Image via Habeeb)


This one is just magical. Just magical. Beirut, 1960. (Image via Souar)


Beirut covered in snow, 1920. (Image via Discover Lebanon)


More pedestrians, less traffic. Old is gold. Martyrs’ Square, date unknown. (Image via Discover Lebanon)


AUB Beach, 1940. (Image via Al Mashriq)


A car driving past Byblos Bank, date and area unknown. (Image via Josebox)


A celebration of Lebanon’s independence on November 22 in front of the Parliament building, 1943. (Image via Al Mashri)


Hamra, 1970. (Image via Old Beirut)


Beirut’s airport, 1960. (Image via Old Beirut)


Beirut, 1972. (Image via Swedenburg Blog)


Sheep, men in suits, and sassy women. Rue Georges Picot, 1958. (Image via National Geographic)

This photo was taken by Thomas J. Abercrombie for the National Geographic and its original description read, “For variety, few cities can match Lebanon’s bustling capital. Part Christian, part Moslem, Beirut combines East and West, ancient and modern. Contrasts stand out vividly in street scenes such as this on the Rue Georges Picot.”

More Listomania


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