Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘Israeli occupation

Tidbits #21

Le banquier portant le masque du Covid-19: “Quand je t’ai dit qu’on allait s’en sortir, cela ne voulait pas dire que vous allez vous en sortir (seulement les banquiers s’en sortent), prend soin de toi, respecte les mesures de confinement contre le coronavirus et oublie l’économie, on s’en occupe.”

“For a child who did not know the true meaning of death or fear, March 10 was my first experience of that,” said Katsumoto Saotome, who was only 12 when he and his family escaped as American planes dropped hundreds of thousands of firebombs over Tokyo during World War II. “I have nothing to describe the memory of that night. It is difficult to talk about it, even now.” Since then, Mr. Saotome has spent much of his life fighting to honor the memories of others who survived those air raids, which killed as many as 100,000 Japanese citizens.

Why Europe and USA will be hotbed to Corona? They had colonial passports that allowed them to travel everywhere and rapidly without much of a visa

Authorities of the Israeli occupation have permitted large pharmaceutical firms to carry out tests on Palestinian prisoners, organ harvesting and has been testing weapons on Palestinian children. (All under administrative detention British law)?

USA shown from satellite images: The cities closing. Now I am taking Coronavirus very seriously: I was relying on Trump’s reassuring feedback

US Soldiers in foreign bases are on lockdown for 60 days. Does this include pilots of jet fighters and drone operators?

Why are we adopting emoji as responses? I have a great idea: Let’s create an emoji language, able to construct full sentences. Obviously, emoji will have many colors, and extensions for arms and legs to cover the vast spectrum of emotions and description of feelings and …We would be able to communicate in all languages and won’t need translators and children will become accomplished authors.

When a 20-year-old from Fort Worth in Texas, got an abortion last year, she never had to leave her home. ⁠
⁠She went online and consulted a doctor in Austria who works for Aid Access, a non-profit that helps women who cannot otherwise get abortions. ⁠She paid the group $90. And a pharmacy in India sent her 7 pills.⁠

Life is basically a single friend: a compassionate, caring friend toward the less fortunate and who matches your “invariables” on the basics of life, and who is at your deathbed to shield you from the trauma of deciding: Is there a God or Not.

Encountering a skeuomorph: the buzz on your mobile, for any task you are doing.  Derived from the Greek words skeuos (σκεῦος), “container or tool”, and morphḗ (μορφή), “shape

Skeuomorph, no longer used items, familiarize users to new or foreign technology, just as icons guide travelers around unfamiliar transit systems, menus, or museums.

If Coronavirus broke first in the USA, the number of victims would have been in the millions: China “educated” the World Health Organization (WHO)

Now that Covid-19 has put to rest the notion Time=Money, about time to reconsider the concept of how Time relates to Death.

Israeli occupation, colonization at root of violence

A couple of days ago, two young Palestinians fabricated home-made “machine guns” and crossed all the dozens of barriers and check points and the Wall of Shame  and targeted Israeli soldiers in Tel Aviv, killing 4 and injuring half a dozens.
One of the assailants got angry as his makeshift gun “jammed” and he grabbed a knife on the table of the restaurant  and started to stab. A retired colonel was among the dead.
Tonnie Ch shared this link

“As Israeli leaders vowed revenge and began to impose collective punishment on the occupied Palestinian civilian population, Tel Aviv mayor Ron Huldai was the most high profile figure pointing squarely back at Israel’s occupation as the root cause of violence.

Israel is “maybe the only country in which another people is under occupation and in which these people have no rights,” Huldai told army radio.

“We can’t keep these people in a reality in which they are occupied and [expect] them to reach the conclusion that everything is alright and that they can continue living this way,” Huldai added, in reference to the Palestinians.

In an even more extraordinary statement, the father of Ido Ben Ari, one of the four victims of the shooting attack allegedly carried out by two Palestinian cousins at a Tel Aviv cafe, accused the Israeli government of making the situation worse.

“Last night, after the attack, the prime minister and two of his ministers arrived and yet another security cabinet issued decrees – not to return corpses, to put up barriers, to destroy houses, and to make lives harder,” the father said at his son’s funeral.

“These solutions create suffering, hatred, despair and [lead] to more people joining the circle of terror,” he added. “What’s needed is a solution rather than saying all the time that there’s nobody to make peace with.””

See More

Ali Abunimah debates two former Israeli government advisors on Al Jazeera, following Tel Aviv attack.
electronicintifada.net
The Israeli government has committed a collective punishment, Not only on the people in the town from which are the assailants and who didn’t live there, but also on the entire West Bank. The PM has declared that the homes of the martyrs will be blown up, as usual.
In the meantime, as every Saturday, the police force protect settlers who enters the Muslim Grand Mosque to pray, and prevent males over 45 from coming to pray in their mosque on Friday.
 

Israel refused to listen to me: I’m throwing stones as my Voice

I was born in Jerusalem: I was born under Israeli occupation and martial law (after 1967).

I have never known freedom. I am not a citizen in the land I was born and raised in.

As an East Jerusalem resident, I am neither an Israeli nor a Palestinian citizen.

And when I was 8 years old I started throwing stones, not because I believed stones would bring me freedom, but because I felt it gave me a voice and an outlet for powerlessness.

What other way could I make my voice heard? Now, years later, I realize there are other ways, but I still understand the frustration, anger, and feeling of hopelessness.

It was a phone call everyone fears.  “I was attacked,” my nephew Muhammad said when I answered the phone, his voice shaking. “By settlers.” I was immediately terrified. He continued, “I was going to pick up some groceries for the dinner tonight. They had knives and clubs and were yelling, ‘Kill him! Kill him!’

Ironically, Muhammad was attacked while buying groceries to cook dinner for our family friends, Yuval Ben Ami and Ruthi Pliskin. The Israeli extremists cornered him on the Mount of Olives near the Mormon College, beat him, and dislocated his shoulder. Fortunately, he was able to break free and escape with his life.

A few hours later, I received a text message from my friend Sarah Blum, an Israeli Jew. A Palestinian had tried to stab her at the Central Bus Station earlier that day.

Oct 26, 2015
Aziz Abu Sarah is a National Geographic Cultural Educator and Explorer, A TED Fellow and the Co-found of MEJDI Tours www.mejditours.com

The fear people have is real on every side.

Most of my Israeli friends who used to come and meet me in East Jerusalem cannot take the risk anymore.

The streets in West Jerusalem are empty. And recently in social gatherings with Palestinian friends, the conversation inevitably turns to strategies for staying safe. When walking to the store, we think twice about our look and our dress. You don’t want to look “too Arab,” or a Lahava gang might attack you. But then what does an Arab look like?

Last week a Jew stabbed another Jew because he thought he was Arab, and Thursday two Israeli soldiers shot a third Israeli in another case of mistaken identity. As an Arab, you also risk being stabbed by a Palestinian if you dress or act too “Israeli.”

I travel between the West Bank and Israel on an almost daily basis. I am constantly in contact with Palestinians and Israelis who are immersed in completely different realities.

Israel has been occupying the West Bank for the last 48 years, and the policies of force have not brought peace and security for either side.

Today, Jerusalem is not the city of peace, but the city of contradictions.

While Prime Minister Netanyahu continues to call Jerusalem a united city, he is blind to the needs of a third of its population. There can be no unity in a city where there is no equality between its residents, or where there is only infrastructure on the Jewish side of town.

There is no unity in a city where most Palestinians cannot get permits to build new homes.

There is no unity in a city where thousands of classrooms are missing from the East side.

I can’t help but wonder what kind of Jerusalem we are fighting for. Today the city feels like a military canton.

A Palestinian can’t walk 100 meters without being stopped by the police.

Traffic is unbearable and security checks are humiliating with people being asked to removed pants and shirts in public.

Currently, Israelis walk the streets looking over their shoulders, to make sure no one is approaching from behind (the stabbing tactics). West Jerusalem is empty; people are not taking chances riding buses or going to restaurants.

On the Palestinian side people are also angry, frustrated, and afraid. Some express the notion that we should not be the only ones living in misery, asking, “Why should we suffer from the Occupation, while Israelis live in a bubble?”

It is not that Palestinians believe an Intifada of knives will bring freedom. But the political process is dead, the settlements continue devouring what little land is left for a Palestinian state, and raising a Palestinian flag at the UN hasn’t changed one fact on the ground.

The cases of Muhammad and Sarah remind me that I am also a resident of a different Jerusalem— a Jerusalem that can be an example of how Palestinians and Israelis can live together in peace.

This Jerusalem is only seen in glimpses of day-to-day human interactions: I see it in individual Israelis and Palestinians like Muhammad and Sarah, people who refuse to be enemies and refuse to accept the “us-them” duality.

In a time when our leaders and politicians are failing us, these individuals go out of their way to create a different reality. They are the real inspirational leaders and the true hope of Jerusalem.

Whitewash rainbow flag from West Bank barrier: Palestinian protesters

Palestinian protesters have whitewashed a rainbow flag painted on six slabs of the West Bank separation barrier.

Khaled Jarrar, the Palestinian painter of the piece, said his art was meant as a reminder of Israeli occupation, at a time when gay rights are in the news after the US allowed same-sex marriage.

But protesters perceived the painting as support for homosexuality, a taboo subject in Palestinian society where gay people are not tolerated. (That should be the least of their worries and indignities)

It ignited angry responses and activists whitewashed the flag on Monday night, just a few hours after it was painted on the best-known section of Israel’s graffiti-covered barrier, next to a portrait of Yasser Arafat and other Palestinian figures.

Jarrar, 39, who has exhibited his work in Europe and the US, told the Associated Press on Tuesday that the destruction “reflects the absence of tolerance and freedoms in the Palestinian society”.

“People don’t accept different thinking in our society,” he said, adding he painted the rainbow flag on the barrier to put a spotlight on Palestinian issues.

Israel, meanwhile, has emerged as one of the world’s most gay-friendly travel destinations, in sharp contrast to the rest of the Middle East where gay people are often persecuted and even killed. Earlier this month, more than 100,000 people attended a gay pride parade in Tel Aviv.

Officially there is still no same-sex marriage in Israel, primarily because there is no civil marriage of any kind – all Jewish weddings must be conducted through the rabbinate, which considers homosexuality a sin and a violation of Jewish law. But the state recognises same-sex couples who marry abroad. (Same for Lebanon of a civil marriage)

Same-sex relations are punishable by death in Iran, Mauritania, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen.

Palestinians who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) face a unique, complex, and often dire set of struggles on multiple fronts.

Palestinian society is in many ways deeply conservative and traditional, so those who identify as LGBTQ often face harsh reactions from their families and communities, ranging from social ostracism to physical violence.

At the same time, LGBTQ Palestinians in Israel and the occupied territories regularly face discrimination, denials of civil and human rights, and other forms of violence and inequality as a result of their Palestinian identity.

LGBTQ Palestinians are often urged to choose between being Palestinian and being queer, but these problems are not separable: as LGBTQ Palestinians, our sexual/gender identities and our national/cultural identities are inextricably linked – both in how we understand and identify ourselves and in the struggles we face as individuals and as a community.

Troubled by the absence of an organisation that caters to the specific needs of our community, we – a group of LGBTQ Palestinians who live in Israel and the occupied territories – founded al-Qaws (Arabic for “rainbow”), which became the first legally recognised, autonomous Palestinian LGBTQ organisation in November last year.

Motivated by a vision of a non-hierarchical society that recognises – and values – the diversity of sexual and gender identities, al-Qaws aspires to play a pioneering role in helping to build a just Palestinian society based on tolerance, equality, and openness. We believe that such a society will serve as a source of freedom and creativity and will enrich the lives, not only of LGBTQ Palestinians, but Palestinians in general.

Founded as an autonomous project within the Jerusalem Open House for Pride and Tolerance (JOH) in 2001, al-Qaws obtained non-profit status and became an independent legal entity at the culmination of an intense process of organisational and group work among our leadership group that began in September 2006.

Our desire to form an independent organisation was based on our conviction that this was the only way we could adequately address our specific and growing needs as Palestinian LGBTQs and provide a forum for internal dialogue about our multiple identities and our relationship with Palestinian society at large.

The particular social context in which we live and work provided the original catalyst for al-Qaws, but it also shapes our overall mission and our daily work. In contrast to many western societies, where queer communities and movements have matured over the past several decades, the queer Palestinian community is still nascent, at best.

Besides that, the dominant western constructs of queer identity do not have the same relevance for many Palestinians, who are left without a culturally meaningful set of narratives around which to organise a movement and understand their identities and desires. The result is that most LGBTQ Palestinians face two equally unsatisfactory options. One is to conform with local cultural norms and live outwardly “heterosexual” lives. The other is to risk persecution by adopting an identity that many Palestinians associate with the west. Al-Qaws is therefore determined, not simply to mimic an existing model of queer identity/community, but to provide a social space for LGBTQ Palestinians to independently engage in a dialogue about our own visions and ideals for a community.

More broadly, we aim to promote transformation and change in Palestinian society by, on one hand, challenging social attitudes and religious taboos about sexuality and gender and, on the other hand, advancing the social engagement and contributions of LGBTQ Palestinians through empowerment, education, and the development of leadership skills.

At the same time, however, we emphasise that LGBTQ Palestinians face pressures, not just from Palestinian society, but from the wider context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. LGBTQ Palestinians’ struggles are a complex result of problems internal to Palestinian society and the harsh realities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Al-Qaws aims to serve the needs of LGBTQ Palestinians with an eye to both sides of this equation, and although we are hopeful and determined, we are also recognise the limits the political situation places on our ability to bring change.

For example, while Palestinians in Israel, Jerusalem, and the occupied territories of the West Bank and the Gaza constitute one community, our different legal statuses and the different realities of each of these locations – including, for example, restrictions on the freedom of movement of Palestinians from the West Bank and Gaza – severely constrain our ability to meet as a community.

Despite these obstacles, al-Qaws is actively engaged in promoting the development and growth of the Palestinian LGBTQ community in Israel and the Palestinian National Authority. Because this process is inherently linked with the wider struggle to build an equal, diverse, tolerant and open society, al-Qaws is an enthusiastic partner with those who share our vision of a vibrant Palestinian civil society that honours the human and civil rights of all individuals, including those who do not conform to cultural or religious norms of gender and sexuality.

Al-Qaws is currently engaged, for example, in the preparatory stages of a joint research project with local human rights organisations in the West Bank.

This innovative project will examine, for the first time ever, attitudes of social justice activists, human rights activists, and LGBTQs in the West Bank toward the taboo topic of sexual diversity/orientation.

This research will draw attention to the problem of LGBTQ civil and human rights in Palestinian society, inform the scope of our future awareness-raising programmes and educational outreach, and ultimately, we hope, initiate public debates among human rights, women’s, and social justice organisations on frequently ignored issues of gender and sexual identity

Another upcoming research project of al-Qaws will investigate alternatives to the western model of homosexuality/sexual diversity, informed by our own cultures, values, and histories.

The western model, in which “visibility” and “coming out of the closet” are central motifs, is not practical or meaningful for many LGBTQ Palestinians. In order to deal effectively with the actual experiences and needs of LGBTQ Palestinians, a new and more relevant model that responds to our unique historical and cultural context is urgently needed.

In addition to these long-term research projects, al-Qaws is engaged in regular projects that have immediate impacts on the lives of LGBTQ Palestinians in Jerusalem, Yaffa-Tel Aviv, the northern region of Israel, and the West Bank (as often as possible given the political limitations).

For example, we have organised workshops to develop activist and leadership skills among LGBTQ Palestinians, as well as meetings to discuss issues of sexuality and gender more generally.

Additionally, because one of our goals is to provide a safe space for members of the community, we regularly organise social events where LGBTQ Palestinians can feel free to meet and socialise.

And al-Qaws’s LGBTQ Arabic website, one of few such websites, has been a particularly valuable tool, both for networking and educational purposes. More than 1,000 people from Israel-Palestine and beyond have participated in Arabic discussion forums on issues of gender and sexuality since we developed the site.

These are only a few of the many projects in which al-Qaws is engaged, and we are constantly searching for new and innovative ways to respond to the diverse needs of LGBTQ Palestinians. To be sure, ours is not an easy job.

We are fully aware of the complexities of this moment and the challenges that lie ahead. But our move towards independence is an exciting change, and we believe that it will open new opportunities for LGBTQ Palestinians – and also, if less directly, for all Israelis and Palestinians – to imagine, and create, a future based on equality and respect for our differences, rather than the petty prejudices and injustices that characterise so many of our lives

Andrew Bossone  and  Carol Mansour shared and commented on this link.

Not impressed with the shaping of this narrative. Very simplistic. And what the hell does the “Israel, meanwhile…” have to do with this piece?

Israel, meanwhile has giant gay parades, so it is the epitome of tolerance….right.

Never mind the occupation, look at our rainbow feather boas….

Obnoxious. And this is why the move was silly for those who painted over it.

I knew it was inevitable such a fluff piece would come out. Tanya Habjouqa

Khaled Jarrar, a Palestinian artist, said he had meant to call attention to Israeli occupation at a time when gay rights are in news, but flag was labelled ‘shameful’
theguardian.com

adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

November 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Blog Stats

  • 1,441,480 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.adonisbouh@gmail.com

Join 784 other followers

%d bloggers like this: