Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘John Kennedy

Can technology solve our big problems? Very doubtful

So, we used to solve big problems.

On July 21st, 1969, Buzz Aldrin climbed out of Apollo 11’s lunar module and descended onto the Sea of Tranquility.  Aldrin, following the death of Armstrong last year, is now the most senior of the 12 who went to the moon.

Armstrong and Aldrin were alone, but their presence on the moon’s grey surface was the culmination of a convulsive, collective effort.

The Apollo program was the greatest peacetime mobilization in the history of the United States. To get to the moon, NASA spent around 180 billion dollars in today’s money, or 4% of the federal budget.

Apollo employed around 400,000 people and demanded the collaboration of 20,000 companies, universities and government agencies.

People died, including the crew of Apollo 1. But before the Apollo program ended, 24 men flew to the moon.

Why did they go?

They didn’t bring much back: 841 pounds of old rocks, and something all 24 later emphasized — a new sense of the smallness and the fragility of our common home.

Why did they go? The cynical answer is they went because President Kennedy wanted to show the Soviets that his nation had the better rockets. But Kennedy’s own words at Rice University in 1962 provide a better clue.

(Video) John F. Kennedy:

But why, some say, the moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why, 35 years ago, fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon. (Applause) We choose to go to the moon in this decade, and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.

Jason Pontin: To contemporaries, Apollo wasn’t only a victory of West over East in the Cold War. At the time, the strongest emotion was of wonder at the transcendent powers of technology.

They went because it was a big thing to do. Landing on the moon occurred in the context of a long series of technological triumphs.

The first half of the 20th century produced the assembly line and the airplane, penicillin and a vaccine for tuberculosis.

In the middle years of the century, polio was eradicated and smallpox eliminated (They are back with vigor).

Technology itself seemed to possess what Alvin Toffler in 1970 called “accelerative thrust.” For most of human history, we could go no faster than a horse or a boat with a sail, but in 1969, the crew of Apollo 10 flew at 25,000 miles an hour.

Since 1970, no human beings have been back to the moon.

No one has traveled faster than the crew of Apollo 10, and blithe optimism about technology’s powers has evaporated as big problems we had imagined technology would solve, such as going to Mars, creating clean energy, curing cancer, or feeding the world have come to seem intractably hard.

I remember watching the liftoff of Apollo 17. I was five years old, and my mother told me not to stare at the fiery exhaust of a Saturn V rocket.

I vaguely knew this was to be the last of the moon missions, but I was absolutely certain there would be Mars colonies in my lifetime.

 So “Something happened to our capacity to solve big problems with technology has become a commonplace. You hear it all the time.

We’ve heard it over the last two days here at TED.

It feels as if technologists have diverted us and enriched themselves with trivial toys, with things like iPhones and apps and social media, or algorithms that speed automated trading.

There’s nothing wrong with most of these things. They’ve expanded and enriched our lives. But they don’t solve humanity’s big problems.

What happened?

There is a parochial explanation in Silicon Valley, which admits that it has been funding less ambitious companies than it did in the years when it financed Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Genentech.

Silicon Valley says the markets are to blame, in particular the incentives that venture capitalists offer to entrepreneurs.

Silicon Valley says that venture investing shifted away from funding transformational ideas and towards funding incremental problems or even fake problems.

But I don’t think that explanation is good enough. It mostly explains what’s wrong with Silicon Valley.

Even when venture capitalists were at their most risk-happy, they preferred small investments, tiny investments that offered an exit within 10 years. V.C.s have always struggled to invest profitably in technologies such as energy whose capital requirements are huge and whose development is long and lengthy, and V.C.s have never, never funded the development of technologies meant to solve big problems that possess no immediate commercial value.

No, the reasons we can’t solve big problems are more complicated and more profound.

Sometimes we choose not to solve big problems.

We could go to Mars if we want.

NASA even has the outline of a plan. But going to Mars would follow a political decision with popular appeal, and that will never happen. We won’t go to Mars, because everyone thinks there are more important things to do here on Earth.

Sometimes, we can’t solve big problems because our political systems fail.

Today, less than 2% of the world’s energy consumption derives from advanced, renewable sources such as solar, wind and biofuels, less than two percent, and the reason is purely economic.

Coal and natural gas are cheaper than solar and wind, and petroleum is cheaper than biofuels. We want alternative energy sources that can compete on price. None exist.

Now, technologists, business leaders and economists all basically agree on what national policies and international treaties would spur the development of alternative energy: mostly, a significant increase in energy research and development, and some kind of price on carbon.

But there’s no hope in the present political climate that we will see U.S. energy policy or international treaties that reflect that consensus.

Sometimes, big problems that had seemed technological turn out not to be so.

Famines were long understood to be caused by failures in food supply. But 30 years of research have taught us that famines are political crises that catastrophically affect food distribution.

Technology can improve things like crop yields or systems for storing and transporting food, but there will be famines so long as there are bad governments.

Finally, big problems sometimes elude solution because we don’t really understand the problem.

President Nixon declared war on cancer in 1971, but we soon discovered there are many kinds of cancer, most of them fiendishly resistant to therapy, and it is only in the last 10 years that effective, viable therapies have come to seem real. Hard problems are hard.

It’s not true that we can’t solve big problems through technology. We can, we must, but these four elements must all be present:

1. Political leaders and the public must care to solve a problem;

2. institutions must support its solution;

3. It must really be a technological problem; and

4. we must understand it.

The Apollo mission, which has become a kind of metaphor for technology’s capacity to solve big problems, met these criteria. But it is an irreproducible model for the future. It is not 1961.

There is no galvanizing contest like the Cold War, no politician like John Kennedy who can heroize the difficult and the dangerous, and no popular science fictional mythology such as exploring the solar system.

Most of all, going to the moon turned out to be easy. It was just three days away. And arguably it wasn’t even solving much of a problem.

We are left alone with our day, and the solutions of the future will be harder won. God knows, we don’t lack for the challenges.

 Holocaust survivors against Zionist Israel. And what John Kennedy said on Zionism

NEVER AGAIN FOR ANYONE and every one subjected to dehumanizing policies

Lisa Spaulding‘s photo on FB

Whether John Kennedy officially stated this or not, this does not detract from the truth of the statement based on his profound speeches warning us all.

Whether he stated this or not does not detract from the truth of the statement based on his profound speeches warning us all.
 

Jewish survivors and descendants of survivors and victims of Nazi genocide unequivocally condemn the massacre of Palestinians in Gaza

326 Jewish survivors and descendants of survivors and victims of the Nazi genocide have signed this letter written in response to Elie Wiesel’s manipulation of the Nazi Genocide to attempt to justify the attacks on Gaza and the ongoing occupation and colonization of historic Palestine.

We further condemn the United States for providing Israel with the funding to carry out the attack, and Western states more generally for using their diplomatic muscle to protect Israel from condemnation. Genocide begins with the silence of the world.

We are alarmed by the extreme, racist dehumanization of Palestinians in Israeli society, which has reached a fever-pitch. In Israel, politicians and pundits in The Times of Israel and The Jerusalem Post have called openly for genocide of Palestinians and right-wing Israelis are adopting Neo-Nazi insignia.

Furthermore, we are disgusted and outraged by Elie Wiesel’s abuse of our history in these pages to promote blatant falsehoods used to justify the unjustifiable: Israel’s wholesale effort to destroy Gaza and the murder of more than 2,000 Palestinians, including many hundreds of children. Nothing can justify bombing UN shelters, homes, hospitals and universities. Nothing can justify depriving people of electricity and water.

We must raise our collective voices and use our collective power to bring about an end to all forms of racism, including the ongoing genocide of Palestinian people. We call for an immediate end to the siege against and blockade of Gaza. We call for the full economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel. “Never again” must mean NEVER AGAIN FOR ANYONE!

Signed,

Survivors:

  1. Hajo Meyer, survivor of Auschwitz, The Netherlands.
  2. Henri Wajnblum, survivor and son of a victim of Auschwitz from Lodz, Poland. Lives in Belgium.
  3. Renate Bridenthal, child refugee from Hitler, granddaughter of Auschwitz victim, United States.
  4. Marianka Ehrlich Ross, survivor of Nazi ethnic cleansing in Vienna, Austria. Now lives in United States.
  5. Irena Klepfisz, child survivor from the Warsaw Ghetto, Poland. Now lives in United States.
  6. Hedy Epstein, her parents & other family members were deported to Camp de Gurs & subsequently all perished in Auschwitz. Now lives in United States.
  7. Lillian Rosengarten, survivor of the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
  8. Suzanne Weiss, survived in hiding in France, and daughter of a mother who was murdered in Auschwitz. Now lives in Canada.
  9. H. Richard Leuchtag, survivor, United States.
  10. Ervin Somogyi, survivor and son of survivors, United States.
  11. Ilse Hadda, survivor on Kindertransport to England. Now lives in United States.
  12. Jacques Glaser, survivor, France.
  13. Eva Naylor, surivor, New Zealand.
  14. Suzanne Ross, child refugee from Nazi occupation in Belgium, two thirds of family perished in the Lodz Ghetto, in Auschwitz, and other Camps, United States.
  15. Bernard Swierszcz, Polish survivor, lost relatives in Majdanek concentration camp. Now lives in the United States.
  16. Joseph Klinkov, hidden child in Poland. Lives in the United States.
  17. Nicole Milner, survivor from Belgium. Now lives in United States.
  18. Hedi Saraf, child survivor and daughter of survivor of Dachau, United States.
  19. Michael Rice, child survivor, son and grandson of survivor, aunt and cousin murderd, ALL 14 remaining Jewish children in my Dutch boarding school were murdered in concentration camps, United States.
  20. Barbara Roose, survivor from Germany, half-sister killed in Auschwitz, United States.
  21. Sonia Herzbrun, survivor of Nazi genocide, France.
  22. Ivan Huber, survivor with my parents, but 3 of 4 grandparents murdered, United States.
  23. Altman Janina, survivor of Janowski concentration camp, Lvov. Lives in Israel.
  24. Leibu Strul Zalman, survivor from Vaslui Romania. Lives in Jerusalem, Palestine.
  25. Miriam Almeleh, survivor, United States.
  26. George Bartenieff, child survivor from Germany and son of survivors, United States.
  27. Margarete Liebstaedter, survivor, hidden by Christian people in Holland. Lives in Belgium.
  28. Edith Bell, survivor of Westerbork, Theresienstadt, Auschwitz and Kurzbach. Lives in United States.
  29. Janine Euvrard, survivor, France.
  30. Harry Halbreich, survivor, German.
  31. Ruth Kupferschmidt, survivor, spent five years hiding, The Netherlands.
  32. Annette Herskovits, hidden child and daughter of victims deported to Auschwitz from France. Lives in the United States.
  33. Felicia Langer, survivor from Germany. Lives in Germany.
  34. Moshe Langer, survivor from Germany, Moshe survived 5 concentration camps, family members were exterminated. Lives in Germany.
  35. Adam Policzer, hidden child from Hungary. Now lives in Canada.
  36. Juliane Biro, survivor via the Kindertransport to England, daughter of survivors, niece of victims, United States.
  37. Edith Rubinstein, child refugee, granddaughter of 3 victims, many other family members were victims, Belgium.
  38. Jacques Bude, survivor, mother and father murdered in Auschwitz, Belgium.
  39. Nicole Kahn, survivor, France.

Children of survivors:

  1. Liliana Kaczerginski, daughter of Vilna ghetto resistance fighter and granddaughter of murdered in Ponary woods, Lithuania. Now lives in France.
  2. Jean-Claude Meyer, son of Marcel, shot as a hostage by the Nazis, whose sister and parents died in Auschwitz. Now lives in France.
  3. Chava Finkler, daughter of survivor of Starachovice labour camp, Poland. Now lives in Canada.
  4. Micah Bazant, child of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  5. Sylvia Schwarz, daughter and granddaughter of survivors and granddaughter of victims of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  6. Margot Goldstein, daughter and granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  7. Ellen Schwarz Wasfi, daughter of survivors from Vienna, Austria. Now lives in United States.
  8. Lisa Kosowski, daughter of survivor and granddaughter of Auschwitz victims, United States.
  9. Daniel Strum, son of a refugee from Vienna, who, with his parents were forced to flee in 1939, his maternal grand-parents were lost, United States.
  10. Bruce Ballin, son of survivors, some relatives of parents died in camps, one relative beheaded for being in the Baum Resistance Group, United States.
  11. Rachel Duell, daughter of survivors from Germany and Poland, United States.
  12. Tom Mayer, son of survivor and grandson of victims, United States.
  13. Alex Nissen, daughter of survivors who escaped but lost family in the Holocaust, Australia.
  14. Mark Aleshnick, son of survivor who lost most of her family in Nazi genocide, United States.
  15. Prof. Haim Bresheeth, son of two survivors of Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen, London.
  16. Todd Michael Edelman, son and grandson of survivors and great-grandson of victims of the Nazi genocide in Hungary, Romania and Slovakia, United States.
  17. Tim Naylor, son of survivor, New Zealand.
  18. Victor Nepomnyashchy, son and grandson of survivors and grandson and relative of many victims, United States.
  19. Tanya Ury, daughter of parents who fled Nazi Germany, granddaughter, great granddaugher and niece of survivors and those who died in concentration camps, Germany.
  20. Rachel Giora, daughter of Polish Jews who fled Poland, Israel.
  21. Jane Hirschmann, daughter of survivors, United States.
  22. Jenny Heinz, daughter of survivor, United States.
  23. Jaap Hamburger, son of survivors and grandchild of 4 grandparents murdered in Auschwitz, The Netherlands.
  24. Elsa Auerbach, daughter of Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, United States.
  25. Julian Clegg, son and grandson of Austrian refugees, relative of Austrian and Hungarian concentration camp victims, Taiwan.
  26. David Mizner, son of a survivor, relative of people who died in the Holocaust, United States.
  27. Jeffrey J. Westcott, son and grandson of Holocaust survivors from Germany, United States.
  28. Susan K. Jacoby, daughter of parents who were refugees from Nazi Germany, granddaughter of survivor of Buchenwald, United States.
  29. Audrey Bomse, daughter of a survivor of Nazi ethnic cleansing in Vienna, lives in United States.
  30. Daniel Gottschalk, son and grandson of refugees from the Holocaust, relative to various family members who died in the Holocaust, United States.
  31. Barbara Grossman, daughter of survivors, granddaughter of Holocaust victims, United States.
  32. Abraham Weizfeld PhD, son of survivorswho escaped Warsaw (Jewish Bundist) and Lublin ghettos, Canada.
  33. David Rohrlich, son of refugees from Vienna, grandson of victim, United States.
  34. Walter Ballin, son of holocaust survivors, United States.
  35. Fritzi Ross, daughter of survivor, granddaughter of Dachau survivor Hugo Rosenbaum, great-granddaughter and great-niece of victims, United States.
  36. Reuben Roth, son of survivors who fled from Poland in 1939, Canada.
  37. Tony Iltis, father fled from Czechoslovakia and grandmother murdered in Auschwitz, Australia.
  38. Anne Hudes, daughter and granddaughter of survivors from Vienna, Austria, great-granddaughter of victims who perished in Auschwitz, United States.
  39. Mateo Nube, son of survivor from Berlin, Germany. Lives in United States.
  40. John Mifsud, son of survivors from Malta, United States.
  41. Mike Okrent, son of two holocaust / concentration camp survivors, United States.
  42. Susan Bailey, daughter of survivor and niece of victims, UK.
  43. Brenda Lewis, child of Kindertransport survivor, parent’s family died in Auschwitz and Terezin. Lives in Canada.
  44. Patricia Rincon-Mautner, daughter of survivor and granddaughter of survivor, Colombia.
  45. Barak Michèle, daughter and grand-daughter of a survivor, many members of family were killed in Auschwitz or Bessarabia. Lives in Germany.
  46. Jessica Blatt, daughter of child refugee survivor, both grandparents’ entire families killed in Poland. Lives in United States
  47. Maia Ettinger, daughter & granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  48. Ammiel Alcalay, child of survivors from then Yugoslavia. Lives in United States.
  49. Julie Deborah Kosowski, daughter of hidden child survivor, grandparents did not return from Auschwitz, United States.
  50. Julia Shpirt, daughter of survivor, United States.
  51. Ruben Rosenberg Colorni, grandson and son of survivors, The Netherlands.
  52. Victor Ginsburgh, son of survivors, Belgium.
  53. Arianne Sved, daughter of a survivor and granddaughter of victim, Spain.
  54. Rolf Verleger, son of survivors, father survived Auschwitz, mother survived deportation from Berlin to Estonia, other family did not survive. Lives in Germany.
  55. Euvrard Janine, daughter of survivors, France.
  56. H. Fleishon, daughter of survivors, United States.
  57. Barbara Meyer, daughter of survivor in Polish concentration camps. Lives in Italy.
  58. Susan Heuman, child of survivors and granddaughter of two grandparents murdered in a forest in Minsk. Lives in United States.
  59. Rami Heled, son of survivors, all grandparents and family killed by the Germans in Treblinka, Oswiecim and Russia. Lives in Israel.
  60. Eitan Altman, son of survivor, France.
  61. Jorge Sved, son of survivor and grandson of victim, United Kingdom
  62. Maria Kruczkowska, daughter of Lea Horowicz who survived the holocaust in Poland. Lives in Poland.
  63. Sarah Lanzman, daughter of survivor of Auschwitz, United States.
  64. Cheryl W, daughter, granddaughter and nieces of survivors, grandfather was a member of the Dutch Underground (Eindhoven). Lives in Australia.
  65. Chris Holmquist, son of survivor, UK.
  66. Beverly Stuart, daughter and granddaughter of survivors from Romania and Poland. Lives in United States.
  67. Peter Truskier, son and grandson of survivors, United States.
  68. Karen Bermann, daughter of a child refugee from Vienna. Lives in United States.
  69. Rebecca Weston, daughter and granddaughter of survivor, Spain.
  70. Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky, daughter of Holocaust survivors, London, UK.
  71. Marion Geller, daughter and granddaughter of those who escaped, great-granddaughter and relative of many who died in the camps, UK.
  72. Susan Slyomovics, daughter and granddaughter of survivors of Auschwitz, Plaszow, Markleeberg and Ghetto Mateszalka, United States.
  73. Helga Fischer Mankovitz, daughter, niece and cousin of refugees who fled from Austria, niece of victim who perished, Canada.
  74. Michael Wischnia, son of survivors and relative of many who perished, United States.
  75. Arthur Graaff, son of decorated Dutch resistance member and nazi victim, The Netherlands.
  76. Yael Kahn, daughter of survivors who escaped Nazi Germany, many relatives that perished, UK.
  77. Pierre Stambul, son of French resistance fighters, father deported to Buchenwalk, grandparents disapeared in Bessarabia, France.
  78. Georges Gumpel, son of a deportee who died at Melk, Austria (subcamp of Mauthausen), France.
  79. Emma Kronberg, daughter of survivor Buchenwald, United States.
  80. Hannah Schwarzschild, daughter of a refugee who escaped Nazi Germany after experiencing Kristallnacht, United States.
  81. Rubin Kantorovich, son of a survivor, Canada.
  82. Daniele Armaleo, son of German refugee, grandparents perished in Theresienstadt, United States.
  83. Aminda Stern Baird, daughter of survivor, United States.
  84. Ana Policzer, daughter of hidden child, granddaughter of victim, niece/grandniece of four victims and two survivors, Canada.
  85. Sara Castaldo, daughter of survivors, United States.
  86. Pablo Policzer, son of a survivor, Canada.
  87. Gail Nestel, daughter of survivors who lost brothers, sisters, parents and cousins, Canada.
  88. Elizabeth Heineman, daughter and niece of unaccompanied child refugees, granddaughter of survivors, great-granddaughter and grand-niece of victims, United States.
  89. Lainie Magidsohn, daughter of child survivor and numerous other relatives from Czestochowa, Poland. Lives in Canada.
  90. Doris Gelbman, daughter and granddaughter of survivors, granddaughter and niece of many who perished, United States.
  91. Erna Lund, daughter of survivor, Norway.
  92. Rayah Feldman, daughter of refugees, granddaughter and niece of victims and survivors, UK.
  93. Hadas Rivera-Weiss, daughter of survivors from Hungary, mother Ruchel Weiss née Abramovich and father Shaya Weiss, United States.
  94. Pedro Tabensky, son of survivor of the Budapest Ghetto, South Africa.
  95. Allan Kolski Horwitz, son of a survivor; descendant of many, many victims, South Africa.
  96. Monique Mojica, child of survivor, relative to many victims murdered in Auschwitz. Canada.
  97. Mike Brecher, son of a Kindertransport survivor and grandson of two who did not survive. UK.
  98. Nomi Yah Gardiner, daughter and granddaughter of survivors, relative of victims, United States.
  99. Marianne van Leeuw Koplewicz, daughter of deported parents, grand-daughter and niece of victims, Belgium.

 

Grandchildren of survivors

  1. Raphael Cohen, grandson of Jewish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  2. Emma Rubin, granddaughter of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  3. Alex Safron, grandson of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  4. Danielle Feris, grandchild of a Polish grandmother whose whole family died in the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
  5. Jesse Strauss, grandson of Polish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  6. Anna Baltzer, granddaughter of survivors whose family members perished in Auschwitz (others were members of the Belgian Resistance), United States.
  7. Abigail Harms, granddaughter of Holocaust survivor from Austria, Now lives in United States.
  8. Tessa Strauss, granddaughter of Polish Jewish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  9. Caroline Picker, granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  10. Amalle Dublon, grandchild and great-grandchild of survivors of the Nazi holocaust, United States.
  11. Antonie Kaufmann Churg, 3rd cousin of Ann Frank and grand-daughter of NON-survivors, United States.
  12. Aliza Shvarts, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  13. Linda Mamoun, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  14. Abby Okrent, granddaughter of survivors of the Auschwitz, Dachau, Stuttgart, and the Lodz Ghetto, United States.
  15. Ted Auerbach, grandson of survivor whose whole family died in the Holocaust, United States.
  16. Beth Bruch, grandchild of German Jews who fled to US and great-grandchild of Nazi holocaust survivor, United States.
  17. Bob Wilson, grandson of a survivor, United States.
  18. Katharine Wallerstein, granddaughter of survivors and relative of many who perished, United States.
  19. Sylvia Finzi, granddaughter and niece of Holocaust victims murdered in Auschwitz, London and Berlin. Now lives in London.
  20. Esteban Schmelz, grandson of KZ-Theresienstadt victim, Mexico City.
  21. Françoise Basch, grand daughter of Victor and Ilona Basch murdered by the Gestapo and the French Milice, France.
  22. Gabriel Alkon, grandson of Holocaust survivors, Untied States.
  23. Nirit Ben-Ari, grandchild of Polish grandparents from both sides whose entire family was killed in the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
  24. Heike Schotten, granddaughter of refugees from Nazi Germany who escaped the genocide, United States.
  25. Ike af Carlstèn, grandson of survivor, Norway.
  26. Elias Lazarus, grandson of Holocaust refugees from Dresden, United States and Australia.
  27. Laura Mandelberg, granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, United States.
  28. Josh Ruebner, grandson of Nazi Holocaust survivors, United States.
  29. Shirley Feldman, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  30. Nuno Cesar Ferreira, grandson of survivor, Brazil.
  31. Andrea Land, granddaugher of survivors who fled programs in Poland, all European relatives died in German and Polish concentration camps, United States.
  32. Sarah Goldman, granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  33. Baruch Wolski, grandson of survivors, Austria.
  34. Frank Amahran, grandson of survivor, United States.
  35. Eve Spangler, granddaughter of Holocaust NON-survivor, United States.
  36. Gil Medovoy, grandchild of Fela Hornstein who lost her enitre family in Poland during the Nazi genocide, United States.
  37. Michael Hoffman, grandson of survivors, rest of family killed in Poland during Holocaust, live in El Salvador.
  38. Sarah Hogarth, granddaughter of a survivor whose entire family was killed at Auschwitz, United States.
  39. Tibby Brooks, granddaughter, niece, and cousin of victims of Nazis in Ukraine. Lives in United States.
  40. Dan Berger, grandson of survivor, United States.
  41. Dani Baurer, granddaughter of Baruch Pollack, survivor of Auschwitz. Lives in United States.
  42. Talia Baurer, granddaughter of a survivor, United States.
  43. Evan Cofsky, grandson of survivor, UK.
  44. Annie Sicherman, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  45. Anna Heyman, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
  46. Maya Ober, granddaughter of survivor and relative of deceased in Teresienstadt and Auschwitz, Tel Aviv.
  47. Anne Haan, granddaughter of Joseph Slagter, survivor of Auschwitz. Lives in The Netherlands.
  48. Oliver Ginsberg, grandson of victim, Germany.
  49. Alexia Zdral, granddaughter of Polish survivors, United States.
  50. Mitchel Bollag, grandson of Stanislaus Eisner, who was living in Czechoslovakia before being sent to a concentration camp. United States.
  51. Vivienne Porzsolt, granddaughter of victims of Nazi genocide, Australia.
  52. Lisa Nessan, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  53. Kally Alexandrou, granddaughter of survivors, Australia.
  54. Laura Ostrow, granddaughter of survivors, United States
  55. Anette Jacobson, granddaughter of relatives killed, town of Kamen Kashirsk, Poland. Lives in United States.
  56. Tamar Yaron (Teresa Werner), granddaughter and niece of victims of the Nazi genocide in Poland, Israel.
  57. Antonio Roman-Alcalá, grandson of survivor, United States.
  58. Jeremy Luban, grandson of survivor, United States.
  59. Heather West, granddaughter of survivors and relative of other victims, United States.
  60. Jeff Ethan Au Green, grandson of survivor who escaped from a Nazi work camp and hid in the Polish-Ukranian forest, United States.
  61. Johanna Haan, daughter and granddaughter of victims in the Netherlands. Lives in the Netherlands.
  62. Aron Ben Miriam, son of and nephew of survivors from Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, Salzwedel, Lodz ghetto. Lives in United States.
  63. Noa Shaindlinger, granddaughter of four holocaust survivors, Canada.
  64. Merilyn Moos, granddaughter, cousin and niece murdered victims, UK.
  65. Ruth Tenne, granddaughter and relative of those who perished in Warsaw Ghetto, London.
  66. Craig Berman, grandson of Holocaust survivors, UK.
  67. Nell Hirschmann-Levy, granddaughter of survivors from Germany. Lives in United States.
  68. Osha Neumann, grandson of Gertrud Neumann who died in Theresienstadt. Lives in United States.
  69. Georg Frankl, Grandson of survivor Ernst-Immo Frankl who survived German work camp. Lives in Germany.
  70. Julian Drix, grandson of two survivors from Poland, including survivor and escapee from liquidated Janowska concentration camp in Lwow, Poland. Lives in United States.
  71. Katrina Mayer, grandson and relative of victims, UK.
  72. Avigail Abarbanel, granddaughter of survivors, Scotland.
  73. Denni Turp, granddaughter of Michael Prooth, survivor, UK.
  74. Fenya Fischler, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
  75. Yakira Teitel, granddaughter of German Jewish refugees, great-granddaughter of survivor, United States.
  76. Sarah, granddaughter of survivor, the Netherlands.
  77. Susan Koppelman, granddaughter of survivor, United States
  78. Hana Umeda, granddaughter of survivor, Warsaw.
  79. Jordan Silverstein, grandson of two survivors, Canada.
  80. Daniela Petuchowski, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  81. Aaron Lerner, grandson of survivors, United States.
  82. Judith Bernstein, granddaughter of Holocaust victims in Auschwitz, Germany.
  83. Samantha Wischnia, granddaughter and great niece of survivors from Poland, United States.
  84. Elizabeth Wischnia, granddaughter and grand niece of three holocaust survivors, great aunt worked for Schindler, United States.
  85. Daniel Waterman, grandson of survivor, The Netherlands.
  86. Elana Baurer, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
  87. Pablo Roman-Alcala, grandson of participant in the kindertransport and survivor, Germany.
  88. Karine Abdel Malek, grandchild of survivor, Henri Waisman, Morocco.
  89. Elana Baurer, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
  90. Lillian Brown, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
  91. Devin Cahn, grandson of survivors, United States.
  92. Daniel Lévyne, grandson of a deportee, France.
  93. Emilie Ferreira, granddaughter of survivors, Switzerland.
  94. Chaim Neslen, grandchild of many victims and friend of many survivors, UK.
  95. Ann Jungmann, granddaughter to three victims, UK.
  96. Ellie Schling, granddaughter of a survivor, UK.
  97. Danny Katch, grandson of a survivor, United States.
  98. Elisa Levi, granddaughter of three survivors, United States.
  99. Karen Pomer, granddaughter of Henri B. van Leeuwen, member of Dutch resistance and survivor of Bergen Belsen, United States.
  100. Gilda Mitchell Katz, granddaughter of survivors, uncle and aunt killed In Dombrova, Canada.
  101. Smadar Carmon, my grandparents and uncle were killed in the camps, Canada.
  102. Dana Newfield, granddaughter of survivor and relative of many murdered, United States.
  103. Ilana Guslits, granddaughter of two Polish survivors, Canada.
  104. Gerald Coles-Kolsky, grandson of victims in Poland and France, United States.
  105. Lesley Swain, granddaughter and cousin of survivors, UK.
  106. Myera Waese, granddaughter of survivors of Bergen Belsen, Canada.
  107. Ronni Seidman, grandchild of survivors. United States.
  108. Mike Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
  109. Nance Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
  110. Karen Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
  111. Myriam Burger, granddaughter of survivor. United States.
  112. Andre Burger, grandson of survivor Myriam Cohn, great-grandson of Sylvia Cohn and great-nephew of Esther Lore Cohn, both murdered in Auschwitz, United States.
  113. Sara Ayech, granddaughter of Gisela and Max Roth, survivors who lost many family members, UK.
  114. Monika Vykoukal, granddaughter of survivor, France.
  115. Patricia Reinheimer, grandaugther of survivors, Brazil.
  116. Nancy Patchell, granddaughter of resistance fighters, grandfather was caught and died in a concentration camp, Canada.
  117. Jaclyn Pryor, granddaughter of survivors from Czestochowa Ghetto, Poland; great-grandchild, niece, and cousin to many who perished, United States.
  118. Steven Rosenthal, grandson of survivor, Chile.
  119. Alfredo Hilt, grandson of victim, Germany.
  120. Arturo Desimone, grandson of a survivor of the ghetto of Çzestochowa, The Netherlands.
  121. Lazer Lederhendler, grandson of victims whose seven siblings also perished in the Warsaw Ghetto and Treblinka. Lives in Canada.

Great-grandchildren of survivors

  1. Natalie Rothman, great granddaughter of Holocaust victims in Warsaw. Now lives in Canada.
  2. Yotam Amit, great-grandson of Polish Jew who fled Poland, United States.
  3. Daniel Boyarin, great grandson of victims of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  4. Maria Luban, great-granddaughter of survivors of the Holocaust, United States.
  5. Mimi Erlich, great-granddaughter of Holocaust victim, United States.
  6. Olivia Kraus, great-grandaughter of victims, granddaughter and daughter of family that fled Austria and Czechoslovakia. Lives in United States.
  7. Emily (Chisefsky) Alma, great granddaughter and great grandniece of victims in Bialystok, Poland, United States.
  8. Inbal Amin, great-granddaughter of a mother and son that escaped and related to plenty that didn’t, United States.
  9. Matteo Luban, great-granddaughter of survivors, United States.
  10. Saira Weiner, greatgranddaughter and niece of those murdered in the Holocaust, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
  11. Andrea Isaak, great-granddaughter of survivor, Canada.
  12. Alan Lott, great-grandson of a number of relatives lost, United States.
  13. Sara Wines, great-granddaughter of a survivor and great-great granddaughter of victims, United States.

Other relatives of survivors

  1. Terri Ginsberg, niece of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  2. Nathan Pollack, relative of Holocaust survivors and victims, United States.
  3. Marcy Winograd, relatives of victims, United States.
  4. Rabbi Borukh Goldberg, relative of many victims, United States.
  5. Martin Davidson, great-nephew of victims who lived in the Netherlands, Spain.
  6. Miriam Pickens, relative of survivors, United States.
  7. Dorothy Werner, spouse of survivor, United States.
  8. Hyman and Hazel Rochman, relatives of Holocaust victims, United States.
  9. Rich Siegel, cousin of victims who were rounded up and shot in town square of Czestochowa, Poland. Lives in United States.
  10. Ignacio Israel Cruz-Lara, relative of survivor, Mexico.
  11. Debra Stuckgold, relative of survivors, United States.
  12. Joel Kovel, relatives killed at Babi Yar, United States.
  13. Carol Krauthamer Smith, niece of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
  14. Chandra Ahuva Hauptman, relatives from grandfather’s family died in Lodz ghetto, one survivor cousin and many deceased from Auschwitz, United States.
  15. Shelly Weiss, relative of Holocaust victims, United States.
  16. Carol Sanders, niece and cousin of victims of Holocaust in Poland, United States.
  17. Sandra Rosen, great-niece and cousin of survivors, United States.
  18. Raquel Hiller, relative of victims in Poland. Now lives in Mexico.
  19. Alex Kantrowitz, most of father’s family murdered Nesvizh, Belarus 1941. Lives in United States.
  20. Michael Steven Smith, many relatives were killed in Hungary. Lives in United States.
  21. Linda Moore, relative of survivors and victims, United States.
  22. Juliet VanEenwyk, niece and cousin of Hungarian survivors, United States.
  23. Anya Achtenberg, grand niece, niece, cousin of victims tortured and murdered in Ukraine. Lives in United States.
  24. Betsy Wolf-Graves, great niece of uncle who shot himself as he was about to be arrested by Nazis, United States.
  25. Abecassis Pierre, grand-uncle died in concentration camp, France.
  26. Robert Rosenthal, great-nephew and cousin of survivors from Poland. Lives in United States.
  27. Régine Bohar, relative of victims sent to Auschwitz, Canada.
  28. Denise Rickles, relative of survivors and victims in Poland. Lives in United States.
  29. Louis Hirsch, relative of victims, United States.
  30. Concepción Marcos, relative of victim, Spain.
  31. George Sved, relative of victim, Spain.
  32. Judith Berlowitz, relative of victims and survivors, United States.
  33. Rebecca Sturgeon, descendant of Holocaust survivor from Amsterdam. Lives in UK.
  34. Justin Levy, relative of victims and survivors, Ireland.
  35. Sam Semoff, relative of survivors and victims, UK.
  36. Leah Brown Klein, daughter-in-law of survivors Miki and Etu Fixler Klein, United States
  37. Karen Malpede, spouse of hidden child who then fled Germany. Lives in United States
  38. Michel Euvrard, husband of survivor, France.
  39. Walter Ebmeyer, grandnephew of three Auschwitz victims and one survivor now living in Jerusalem, United States.
  40. Garrett Wright, relative of victims and survivors, United States.
  41. Lynne Lopez-Salzedo, descendant of three Auschwitz victims, United States.
  42. Renee Leavy, 86 victims in my mother’s family, United States.
  43. Steven Kohn, 182 victims in my grandparents’ families, United States.
  44. Dorah Rosen Shuey, relative of many victims and 4 survivors, United States.
  45. Carol Lipton, cousin of survivors, United States.
  46. Catherine Bruckner, descendent of Czech Jewish victims of the holocaust, UK.
  47. Susan Rae Goldstein, carrying the name of my great-aunt Rose Frankel, from Poland and murdered along with many other family members, Canada.
  48. Jordan Elgrably, nephew of Marcelle Elgrably, killed in Auschwitz, United States.
  49. Olivia M Hudis, relative of Auschwitz victims, United States.
  50. Peter Finkelstein, relative of victims and survivors, Germany.
  51. Colin Merrin, descendant of Polish and Belarusian Jewish victims, UK.
  52. Howard Swerdloff, most of my family died in the Shoah, United States.
  53. Margarita E Freund, descendant of Breslau and Ukrainian Jewish victims, United States.
  54. Marsha Goldberg, relative of victims in Poland, United States.

There are passions and passions. Part 2

In part one I wrote:

“There are strong individual passions; there are the “power to be” strong passions, and there are abstract passions that ideologies, religions, and customs would like you to incarnate for a homogeneous community stability.  All those institutions want to select for you the kinds of passions that are appropriate to your well being and development” and I described what I meant by individual strong passions.

In this article, I will attempt to discriminate among the various strong passions from the “power to be” and religious ideology of passion.

Basically, an ideology transmits perceived habits and models for interpreting social and political conditions.

To a lesser extent, an ideology communicates explanations and lead us to make choices for situations and events. It is my contention that every ideology or political party implicitly exhibits a philosophical line, a philosophical construct that is fundamentally a process of prioritizing our individual set of passions, which cannot be changed, but re-ordered, a line focused as a collective of like minded association.

Thus, it is beneficial for any ideology to debate the philosophy that is most compatible to its priority of passions.

Abstract passions of an ideology changes when it comes to power.

For example, during John Kennedy short Presidency, many were enthusiastic joining the Peace Corps; they were willing to share the hardships of communities in remote unprivileged  regions of the world.  In the meanwhile, the power to be was escalating the war in Viet Nam and attempting to destabilize the regime in Cuba.

The French Revolution disseminated the abstract values of equality, liberty, and freedom while the “power to be” installed the guillotine to harvest thousands of heads in the name of the purity of the revolution.

Communist ideologies talked the language of youth’s hopes of economic fairness, socialism and distribution of wealth and then when the regime came to power the set of passions changed.

I cannot help but imagining a conversation between a communist party line administrator and a member of the party:

Party line administrator: “So, you are a dedicated party member; you are passionate about peasant’s life style.  No problem, you are assigned to work the land; preferably with a community of peasants for proper training and practices.”

Memeber: “Oh no!  I am an intellectual. My passion is to read reports, analyze data, and mostly criticize deficiencies in the system.”

Party line: “Oh yes? Why did you join our ranks and swore allegiance to our ideology and political economic lines?”

Memeber: “Well, my morale values and ethical standards yearned for fairness, equality, and justice, and human rights to all.”

Party line: “Too late.  We are now in power and the realities of staying in power demand that you be assigned to be rehabilitated in reform camps.  Fairness, justice, and equality of classes were nice slogans that need to be in operation through specific programs.  The counter cultural revolution is meant to reform naive members into pragmatic needs of the party.  You are worth what your hands, feet, and back can produce from the uncultivated land.  Would you prefer working the land or raising cows and pigs?”

Member: “Wait a minute.  What about a handcraft job?  I love to get my hand dirty in woodworking, in painting, in repairing electronic equipment, in maintaining mechanical machines.  Yes, I wouldn’t mind sanitary assignments, waiting on tables of the Politburo eminent members.  I am convinced that I love becoming chef in the kitchens where you receive diplomats and foreign dignitaries.”

It is up to graduate philosophers to analyze the party line and extract the corresponding philosophy out of hundreds that the human mind has constructed.

An ideology that misses opportunities to seriously debate its underlying philosophy is bound to fail as a gathering of focused passions.

I am aware of a case where a fresh graduate in philosophy and a fresh member in a political party attempted to stick his personal philosophy to the party ideology instead of objectively analyzing the underlying philosophy and allowing free discussion on the topic; it was an opportunity that was missed to debating a rough philosophy that had potentials to be fine tuned and accepted by the collective members.

Most political ideologies loudly claim that the members are the subject matter, that the members are the driving force and the main concern of the ideology.  That line of thinking should be the purpose of syndicates because that is the reason for instituting syndicates and professional associations. Political parties should avoid the technical hypocrisy of proclaiming that their goals are the members’ benefit. 

Members in political ideologies are simple cogs of focused abstract passions.

Fresh members in political parties are willing to slave for free and accept all the nonsense, constraints, and abject humiliation on opinion formally restrained because “they need apprenticeship period” to comprehend and thoroughly learn the mystery behind an ideology, as if it was a cult.

Those individual cogs who regurgitate the political lines and memorize them by rot and spew them integrally are the one who accede to the higher echelons and then reap the benefits and advantages; there are no rooms for divergence of opinions on ideological lines, otherwise, a new ideology is in the making.

It is worth noting that those who accede to the higher echelons are invariably astute power grabbers, but very limited spiritually because they fail to invest energy and time on personal reflections. Those limited minded “leaders” are imposed on society for needed reforms that invariably fail and leave tracks of long miseries and sufferings.

Any ideology is inherently a cult with many super imposed constructs of myths and verbal testimonies of elders that are added as the rank swells; these abstract constructs are meant to increase the obscure notions and make the ideology more fascinating and enduring to the youth, simply because the ideology failed to adhere to an explicit philosophy of rational cohesion.

Fundamentally, schisms are implicitly divergences on priorities of passions to focus on, which are interpreted as political differences.

Religions follow the same process as ideologies and end up splitting and forming schisms and cults.

The core of religions and political ideologies are of abstract constructs with the same consequences on societies.  The main difference between religions and ideologies is that religions invariably end up adhering to a philosophy as guiding rod and are thus enduring in all levels of life for many centuries.

Ideologies in religions are necessary passages for individuals’ spiritual development; they are the building blocks for getting aware and hopefully caring for human miseries and problems.  Ideologies are extensions to our spirit because we need the association of people to develop our soul.

Find me an individual who never joined a political ideology or at least cared in his youth to learn the ideologies of his time and I can forecast that this individual will specialize in his professional discipline and be a complete illiterate outside his field of specialty; he will end up a very narrow minded person with no heart or soul to count on for change and social reforms. 

I would be uncomfortable dealing with an individual who joined an ideology in youth and never felt the need to re-examine his ideology: I simple cannot believe that a young person can be bright enough and wise enough to knowing his strongest passions before dealing with the real world and people.

In many moments in life we asked “what is the meaning and purpose in life?

How about we start from the obvious?

We are a bunch of jumbled passions that drive our life and we ache to re-order our passions and discover the strongest passions that mean most to us.

We want to be discriminated as an individual, not on physical traits, but as thinking reflecting persons that have distinct set of passions that we managed to prioritize; we finally think that we know who we are and what drove our life. We want to be at peace with our soul and spirit.

“Next time, fire it is”; (Feb 28, 2010)

 “It is impossible that past humiliation of Blacks comes back to crush us all.  Blacks will refuse to go to war abroad: How many blacks could the White government locks up in jails for disobedience? The US will be incapable of building a better world, here or elsewhere, if White/Black relation is not improved. The West is still unable to differentiate between the human and the politics in discrimination: The West refuses to accept the slaves brought in chains as valid citizens.
 

We have got to do what is necessary at the price of expulsion, emprisonment, torture, and death. We have got to do what is necessary so that the next generation of blacks pay the least of the bill for human dignity and political civil rights. The impossible is the least we should demand.
 We are beautiful’ when I was a kid I wondered “when vengence is consumated then what would become of all that beauty?” There is a law that says “What goes up must come down”: Whites have reached the top of the curve in ignorance and intransigence. The few of the conscious Blacks have to stand up and fire in order to end this racial nightmare; they have to press for real united nation”

 James Arthur Baldwin (1924-87) settled in France and died in France.  He published “The Conversion, 1953” and “The room of Giovanni” where he proclaimed his homosexual inclinations.  Baldwin participated in the first Black Congress in Paris (1956) and met black intellectuals and artists from around the world. He travelled in Europe and Africa and used to return to the US to participate in critical demonstrations and mass ralies.
 Baldwin demanded of Senator Robert Kennedy to convince his brother President John to carry a balck kid to the south and register him in white school since the US High  Court has recognized this right in 1954.  When Kennedy refused then Baldwin replied: “Nest time, fire it is”  Indeed, the 60’s was plagued by a succession of political assassinations starting by John Kennedy, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy and many other black leaders.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

September 2021
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