Adonis Diaries

Posts Tagged ‘kids

And the kids? Don’t they deserve a “Thank you ovation” for their endurance during this pandemics?

Because they’ve been locked up for more than two months, never complaining?

When we talk about heroes, there are a few very special ones that we forget “THE KIDS”.
– They accept everything.
– They are deprived of going to school.
– They can’t play with their friends anymore.
– Visiting grandparents is forbidden.
– Park outings are over.
– They stopped going shopping with their parents.
– Birthday celebrations friends no longer exist, even his own and have to accept and understand like great people.
– More activities, 💃🕺🤼🏓,, etc.
– They end up supporting adult mood and worries.


And all this without complaining because they know “out there is a disease, a virus“.
“I know mom, it’s because of the coronavirus”.
I want to thank all the kids for this!
It’s our greatest treasures that teach us every day to focus on the most important things

Note: In countries where Covid-19 is rampant abortion has almost doubled. A clear indication of lost of hope in a better future

Balancing Acts: Ballerinas, mothers and kids

Sixteen years ago, photographer mom Lucy Gray decided to create a series of images that would capture the experience of working motherhood.

A chance encounter with a prima ballerina at the market led her to the world of the San Francisco Ballet and the dancers who balanced their onstage careers with their roles as mothers.

Over the course of 15 years, Gray photographed three ballerinas who had children — Katita Waldo, Tina LeBlanc and Kristin Long.

The photographer followed these women as they navigated motherhood and the professional dance world — pumping during breaks backstage, dancing while pregnant, and playing with their children after curtain call.

“I wanted to get their experiences as dancers and as mothers,” Gray told The Huffington Post.

“I wanted them to forget about me and become a near silent witness.”

Gray turned her series of intimate black and white photos into a book called Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers.

balancing acts

“What I learned was that their hallmark was dedication, and that made them effective as dancers and as mothers,” Gray said.

While the women had risked “losing it all” when they decided to bear children while working in their competitive field, the photographer said her subjects actually became better dancers when they became mothers. ”

For these three dancers, letting go of single-minded self-driven rewards and performing for their children put their vocation in perspective.”

“It was the fact of doing both simultaneously that made them better at both occupations — work and child-rearing.

This was possible because of supportive husbands who were also working but doing the lion’s share of child caring.

They all brought the children to the ballet which kept the mother’s connected through dancing seasons until they were off and could spend more intense time with their children.”

ballet mom

Gray hopes that Balancing Acts will resonate with the millions of working mothers in the U.S.

Half the work force are women, and we might accept that that is a good thing, a necessary situation, and that that does not preclude us from succeeding as mothers as well,” she said. “If we as a culture accept this reality then we might begin to support working mothers.

If there is any phrase I have come to dislike it is ‘having it all.’ Why do we tell women that if we are mothers we must give up anything else or fail at everything we do? It just isn’t true.”

The photographer also wants people to feel the joy and pleasure in her subjects’ lives as they embraced the challenge of having children while working.

“These ballerinas created babies and roles on stage, perhaps their span of experience is greater than most of ours, but that gives us a bar to aspire to. They became better dancers after they had children and were better mothers because they kept dancing.

They needed to work to support their children but they also knew that having careers kept them more interested at home. Both sides to their lives fed the other.”

Keep scrolling and watch the book trailer for a preview of some of the stunning images from Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers.

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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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    Balancing Acts: Three Prima Ballerinas Becoming Mothers by Lucy Gray, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2015
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The kid that kept asking questions (March 24, 2009)

 

            The French Colonel Jean-Paul Setau was contributing money to the sick in under-developed States.  He specifically adopted (medically) a girl suffering of leprosy from India.  He visited this girl at the special hospital in France and the nun asked him to deliver spiritual (religious) education for the children.  Jean-Paul prayed and got the answer “go and find out the questions that kids might want answers for”.  Jean-Paul received a list of written questions from kids; a sample follows:

1)      Where do we go after death?

2)      Why are we afraid of strangers?

3)      Do extraterrestrials exist?

4)      Why accidents occur to even people who believe in God?

5)      What God means?

6)      Why we are born if we have to die?

7)      How many stars in the sky?

8)      Does the Lord listen to those who believe in other Gods?

9)      Why there are poor and sick people?

10)  Why God created mosquitoes and flies?

11)  Why the guardian angle is not close by when we feel sad?

12)  Why we love a few people and hate other?

13)  Who named colors?

14)  If God is in heaven with my dead mother, how come God can still be alive?

 

I have a couple of questions. First, if we are honest and sincere, then which one of the questions can you provide an answer to?  Second, if you indeed can answer a question, then how are you going to translate your comprehension to kids?  As for the first question I have no response; but I do have one for my second concern.  I suggest that you speak in stories and parables as Jesus did, but with a twist, that your stories are extracted from our current time and civilization such as video games, school life, urban situation, a few trip in nature, computer, internet navigation, biking, movies, pop songs, and what else do kids do to fill up the void and vacuum nowadays.  If you can come up with such kids’ stories that answer a few of the above questions then you can get rich, filthy rich.

 

            Okakura Kakuzo commented in his book “The Tea Ritual in Japan”:  When I judge someone I am conscious that the tribunal was set up for me: I am judging myself.  We do not see meanness in others: we can only notice our meanness. We can never forgive those who prejudiced us: We believe that we will never be forgiven.  We tell the harsh truth to our brother: We want to hide it in ourselves.  We show our force and power: We do not want others to witness our frailty.

            The ceremony of tea drinking is the adoration of what is beautiful and simple. The effort is focused on the imperfect gestures of everyday with the aim of attempting the perfect task.  The beauty is in the complete respect of what is being done. A day offers dozens of opportunities for perfecting awkward tasks.


adonis49

adonis49

adonis49

November 2020
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